Richard III, King of England

This article is divided in two parts: (1) the basic facts about his life (2) and a discussion of his (possible) involvement in the death of his two nephews, the Princes in the Tower. The post is ideal for students of Shakespeare and Richard’s detractors and defenders.

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George Washington Writes to Lord Botetourt, Governor of Virginia

Dateline: Mt. Vernon, Virginia, 5 October 1770: He wants to protect the interest of the soldiers that served in the Seven Years War or French and Indian War (1754-1763). The colonel knew how to write well and present his case. Bonus: his 1754 memorandum on the need for a fort and expansion. Primary sources here!

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Edward V of England: Prince in the Tower

This article is a quick, uncluttered review of the basic facts. He succeeded to the throne when his father King Edward IV died in 1483, but he was never crowned. He reigned—not ruled—for only 77 days, until his uncle Richard usurped the throne.

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Essential Records of a Key Orphans Court, Part 1 (1677-1690)

Henrico county (“shire”) of earliest Virginia is key. Hundreds of names are here, and some were part of Jamestowne government. Their descendants moved all over the state and beyond. It’s almost a sure thing you can find your early ancestor here.

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Essential Records of a Key Orphans Court, Part 2 (1692-1739)

Henrico county (“shire”) of earliest Virginia is key. Hundreds of names are here, and some were part of Jamestowne government. Their descendants moved all over the state and beyond. It’s almost a sure thing you can find your early ancestor here.

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Protestant Work Ethic, Capitalism, and America’s Founding

It is what made this country great. Max Weber’s thesis recently got a significant boost in the Philippines. Evidence follows. (This post updates the one at American Thinker on 22 July 2018, titled Protestant Work Ethic and the Founding of America.)

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