William Ryland, Jr. and Sarah Baird

This post goes from 1827 to 1888, from Ohio to Missouri, though William will eventually move to Kansas as a widower.

Here are the generational links in the chain for the descendants of William Ryland Jr. and Sarah Baird:

Paul RylandJohn RylandWilliam Ryland Sr. → WILLIAM RYLAND, JR m. (1) SARAH BAIRD

Please click on the post about William Ryland, Jr.’s second marriage to Hannah Jane Vickers (our direct line).

Long before William married Hannah Jane (Janie) Vickers (Frank’s and Bessie’s mother) in December 1883 in Kansas, he married Sarah in Ohio in February 1849. He lived a full life with her, moving to Missouri in fall 1857. He and his kids eventually moved out to Kansas and then most to Oklahoma, after Sarah died in 1882.

So the offspring of William and Sarah in this post are the much-older half-brothers and half-sisters of Floyd (Frank / Slim) and his sister Bessie.

THE BASICS

Let’s get started.

William Ryland

He was born November 13, 1827, in Ashland County, Ohio. He married Sarah Baird / Beard on February 7, 1849, in Wayne County, Ohio. After she died in 1882, he went to Kansas, and eventually he married Hannah Jane (Jennie) Vickers on December 4, 1883 in South Haven, Sumner County, Kansas (see the William Ryland and Hannah Vickers post). He died May 21, 1888, in South Haven and was buried in Rose Hill Cemetery, South Haven.

More about him

He and his young family got established as farmers in Ohio, in 1850, next door to his parents William Sr. and Catherine Ryland. In fall 1857, William and Sarah and their young family load up the wagon or wagons and move to Missouri with William’s older brother John and his wife Mary Ann and their young family. William and Sarah live in Boone and Randolph Counties from 1857 to May 1882. In March 1883, he moves to Sumner County Kansas, after she died in May 1882, in Randolph County.

This post is about their life in Ohio and Missouri.

Photo of his gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580777

Judy Mayfield took the photo, along with the other ones linked below. Thanks!

Sarah Baird

She was born October 26 (or 25), 1831, in Ohio, according to her gravestone in Randolph County, Missouri. She died on May 17, 1882 and is buried in Chapel Grove Cemetery, Randolph County.

More about her

The 1850 Census (see below) says she was 18 years old and four years younger than William, who was recorded as 22. So we have a census error. Her inscription on the side of William’s tombstone reads: “SARAH wife of WM. RYLAND died May 17, 1882 AGED 50 y’s. 6 m’s. 22 d’s.” (The rest of the writing is difficult to read from the photo, except “Randolph County, Missouri”).  Her offspring, who had moved to Kansas and Oklahoma, made sure that her name and relationship with her husband William and her date and place of death should appear on their father William’s tombstone in South Haven, Kansas. This means they wanted to honor their mother where they lived, not leave her memory behind in Missouri.

Photo of her gravestone, in Kansas:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580710

Marriage

February 7, 1849

Wayne County, Ohio. It seems William had connections in Wayne County, while his father lived in Ashland County, in 1849. Ashland and Wayne Counties border each other. This document was handwritten. But a copy of it was also certified by Judge Leo R. Kindsvatter of Wooster, Ohio on January 15, 1971 (vol. 4B, p. 351).

A Transcription follows the image.

 

Wm Jr Hannah 1883 Marriage Lic

 

Marriage Certificate

The State of Ohio

Wayne County ss

William Ryland

To

Sarah Baird

I hereby certify that on the 6th day of February A.D. 1849 Mr. William Ryland and Miss Sarah Baird were legally joined in Marriage by me a Minister of the Gosp[el] Given under my hand this 7th day of February [1849]

Joseph Waldorf

WILLIAM AND SARAH’S CHILDREN

William and Sarah had six in all. Remember, these are the much-older half-brothers and half-sisters of Floyd (Frank / Slim) Rucker Ryland and his sister Bessie May (same father, different mother). Here’s a list at a glance:

  1. Arminda Eunice (1849-1911)
  2. Lucius Marion (1852-1911)
  3. Martin Luther (1854-1901)
  4. William Kendall (1857-1939)
  5. Sarah Almira (1862-1931)
  6. Benjamin Franklin (1865-1925)

The first three children were born in Ashland County, Ohio, before the family’s move to Missouri in fall 1857.

Now let’s fill in the picture of their lives, as much as this is possible for pioneer families and the available records.

  1. Arminda Eunice

She was born in Ashland County, Ohio. The month and year November 1849 is indicated in the 1900 Census for Noble County, Oklahoma. Her father’s 1850 Census back in Ohio says she was seven months old, and it was enumerated in September. Her father’s will, dated April 23, 1888, names her Arminda Eunice Brown, so she married a Brown, back in Missouri, but so far his first name is unknown (see the William Ryland and Hannah Jane Vickers post). Then she married John Benson in 1890. She died on January 29, 1911 and was buried in Grace Hill Cemetery, Perry Township, Noble County, Oklahoma.

More about her

Her life is very interesting. She was a true pioneer, not only in her travels but also in her choice of relationships and in her offspring. In Slim’s sister Bessie May’s handwritten account about the Rylands, she says she lived with Arminda while Bessie was transitioning to school as a mid to late teen and after her mother’s death in 1902. So Arminda is not an abstraction. Slim and his sister Bessie knew her and spoke with her.

Arminda appears in the 1850 Census with her father and mother, in Ashland County, Ohio (see below). She’s the firstborn.

She’s seen in the 1860 Census in Boone County, Missouri, as 11 years old. Of course the census taker smoothes out her name in his mind to Amanda U (see below). So as a child she moved with her family from Ohio to Missouri in fall 1857. This is the first leg in her long journey.

As hard as I search, so far I cannot find her in the 1870 or 1880 Censuses. So from our point of view, these are the missing decades.

Her father’s will, dated 1888, says her married name is Brown. Her section of the will reads:

Second

I give devise and bequeath to my Daughter Arminda Eunice Brown the South half (½) of the North West quarter (¼) of Section Thirty five (35) Township Thirty four (34) Rang [sic] one (1) East to Have and to Hold as her own during her natural life and at her death her present heirs are to inherit the same

We can be sure that she and Brown moved out to Kansas around the time that her brothers and sister did, probably before her father and her younger brother Ben Franklin did in March 1883. But more precise dates are not known so far. Her move out to Kansas is the second major part of her life’s journey. But for all we know, in the missing decades she probably had other adventures and travels.

The next time she appears after she’s named in her father’s will in 1888 is in the 1890 Oklahoma State Census, Crescent City, Logan County (dwelling #63). In the next link “Armanda” Brown should read Arminda (no. 63):

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/logan/census/1890/crescent.htm

In that 1890 Census, the children are Martin L. 18, Otis E. 10, and Elsie C. 6.  She is now head of household, which means probably that Brown died – or they divorced?

What happened to these kids? If Martin’s middle initial stands for Luther (and that’s very likely), he’s named after his uncle (Arminda’s brother) Martin Luther. I’ve done a quick search on Otis E. Brown and a man with that name appears in the 1930 Census, El Dorado, Butler County, Kansas. He’s 50 (birth = 1880) and from Missouri, and his father comes from Vermont, and his mother from Ohio. So we have a match with his year of birth in the 1890 Census, Arminda’s place of origin (Ohio), and her connection to Missouri. But none of this tells us Mr. Brown’s first name. I have not looked hard for the other two kids. Martin L. Brown is not uncommon, and Elsie C. probably has a different surname, after marriage.

As a quick side note, in the same linked 1890 Census, Arminda’s younger brother Ben Franklin Ryland appears at the top. Also, Arminda lives next to her sister Sarah Almira Dingman, whose life also took some interesting twists and turns. For example, we can have no doubt that Sarah and John Henry Dingman divorced, and she married a part Indian, wealthy, named Cornelius A. Callahan, who was much younger than she. But let’s leave their story for another time.

Arminda married John Benson about 1890. As noted, does this mean that Brown died, or did Arminda and he divorce? Whatever the reason, John and Arminda Benson have their child Elmer E. on March 20, 1892.

For the date of Elmer E.’s birth, go here and look for E.E.B.:

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/logan/birth/birth.htm.

But there are some errors, like misspelling Benson as Butney and Beusen, and misspelling Arminda as Amanda. But at least the original clerks or the modern volunteer transcriber spelled Ryland correctly. The boy is initialed as E. E. B., for Elmer E. Benson.

Arminda was 43 years old when she had her last son. This is remarkable for the pioneer days. She must have been quite healthy and robust.

According to the 1900 Census, City of Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma, Arminda E. and John were married for 10 years, which makes their marriage in 1890. He’s 54 and from New York, and she’s 50 and from Ohio and born in November 1849. Their son Elmer E. is 8. John Stone, 44, their boarder, works as a cook and also comes from New York. Puzzle: where’s the youngest daughter Elsie C. by Brown? She would be 16 in 1900. Maybe she lived with her older brothers, or perhaps she married really young.

Next, Slim’s sister Bessie May writes in one of her family accounts:

Arminda Ryland Benson, Perry Okla, with whom I lived after my mother’s death [in 1902]. Went there to live at close of High School year at Wellington Kansas in 1903.

Further, Arminda and John appear in the 1910 Census, City of Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma, she as “Armand” (censuses are often wrong about such things). Their trade or profession says, “none”; the general nature of their industry says, “own income.” Their son Elmer E. does not live with them. But an Elmer E. Benson appears in Enid City, Garfield County, Oklahoma. He’s married to Hattie B., has no employment, but has seven lodgers with them, doing menial jobs. There is a match with his age and his parents’ places of birth. Interestingly, an Elmer Ellzworth Benson signed up for the military in WWI, and he was born on March 31, 1892, in Drumright, Oklahoma. But I’m cautious about this being a match.

Finally, Arminda died in 1911, at 62 years old, when her son Elmer E. was 19.

Here she is in the index for Grace Hill Cemetery, Noble County, Oklahoma (scroll down to Arminda E. Benson):

http://www.okcemeteries.net/noble/gracehill/gracehill.htm

Her travels:

Ohio – Missouri – Kansas – Oklahoma.

She represents the American pioneer woman quite well.

  1. Lucius Marion

He was born December 29, 1852, in Ohio. He married Jennie Crosswhite on October 5, 1873 in Randolph County, Missouri; then he married Mary M. Acuff in July 1883 in Boone County, Missouri. She probably died in childbirth on June 19, 1884. He married Dora Belle Sharp about 1888; they divorced shortly afterwards. He died of tuberculosis on March 10 or 11, 1911, and was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery on March 11, Sumner County, Kansas.

More about him

His (younger) stepmother Hannah Jane refers to him as Marion, in her letter to Bessie May. That’s probably the name he used in day-to-day life. His children by Jennie Crosswhite: H. N. (born 1874) and H. L (born 1876), both born in Missouri.

For his marriage to Jennie Crosswhite, click here:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~randolphroots/marriages3.htm (scroll down to Ryland)

Local newspaper account of Lucius Marion’s death:

March 16, 1911

L. M. Ryland, formerly of Pawhuska [Oklahoma], died Friday evening March 10th at the home of his sister Sadie Callahan at Chautauqua [Kansas]. He was about 59 years of age and had been ill about three years with that dread malady, tuberculosis. He came to Chautauqua about a month ago to stay with his sister until all was over. Early last week his condition indicated that the end was near and the relatives in Oklahoma were sent for. The deceased was a Christian, having united with the M. E. church at an early age. At his request, the funeral services were conducted at the M. E. church by Rev. E. L. Brown.

His move to Sadie Callahan’s house is due to his being single. Also, Sadie was appointed the executor of his will.

February 25, 1911, Chautauqua, Kansas.

Lucius Marion Ryland’s will reads:

Know all men by these presents That I Lucius M. Ryland of Chautauqua Kansas of legal age and sound and disposing mind and memory – Do make and publish this as and for my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.

I desire that my just debts and funeral expenses shall first be paid out of my estate.

The remainder and residue of my estate – I will and bequeath as follows – To my daughter Nellie M. Moon, I will and bequeath one dollar to be paid out of my estate by my executor here and after named within six months after my decease. All the rest and residue of my estate, Real Personal and mixed of which I shall die seized or to which I shall be entitled at my decease I give and bequeath to my sister Sadie A. Callahan. And lastly I do nominate and appoint my said sister Sadie A. Callahan to be the executor and custodian of this my last will and testament without bond.

In testimony whereof I the said Lucius M. Ryland have to this my last will and testament subscribed my name this 25th day of February 1911.

Lucius M. Ryland

Signed Sealed and Published and declared by the said Lucius M. Ryland, as and for his last will and testament, in the presence of us, who at his request, and in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.

Witnesses

M. H. Edwards

E.E. Andrews

W. W. Byers

Transcription ends.

Other data from his probate papers:

He “departed this life” on March 11, 1911, a date that disagrees with his obituary.

He left no widow because he was legally divorced.

He left a daughter Nellie M. Moon, nee Ryland. She had married John H. Moon on December 1, 1906.

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/marr/cqmarri.html (I 234)

On July 9, 1911, the State of Oklahoma, Osage County, discharged the executrix Sadie A. Callahan of her duty and responsibilities, meaning she took care of things properly.

On October 4, 1911, the probate judge Samuel Brunner, Chautauqua County, Kansas, also discharged Sadie A. Callahan of her duties and responsibilities.

His gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23477768

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/cem/okhillnz.html

This webpage at ancestry.com has a brief write-up on Marion:

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/person.aspx?pid=-1645276297&tid=4158367

  1. Martin Luther

He was born March 31, 1854 in Ashland County, Ohio. He married Elizabeth (Lizzie) D. Stockton, daughter of Thomas Stockton and America Jacobs. Lizzie was born April 5, 1856 in Missouri, and died November 23, 1953, in Logan County, Oklahoma. Martin died April 17, 1901 or May 12, 1901, in South Haven, Sumner County, Kansas. He was a 47 year old merchant. After his death, Lizzie (Stockton) Ryland married William A. Kendall, a doctor in Crescent [City], Oklahoma, on September 10, 1903 (not the same man as #4, next!).

Go here for one date of his death:

http://genealogytrails.com/kan/sumner/deathrecordsr.html

However, his probate and tombstone say he died May 12, 1901. I go for this date. Let him live a few more weeks!

More about them: In an excerpt from Shoo Fly City, a history about South Haven, Kansas, he is the clerk of the school board and filed a teachers’ report in 1881. Since he is so well established by 1881, how long did he live in Kansas?

He and Lizzie appear in the 1880 Census, taken in Prairie Township, Randolph County, Missouri, enumerated June 22 and 23. He’s 26 and farming, and she’s 24 and “keeping house.” Their children are Agnes (4), and William T. (Thomas) (1). They live close by Martin’s father (and our) William. To become a clerk of the school board by 1881 in South Haven means that he moved shortly after the census was taken and settled down quickly and got involved in his new community.

Next, he and Lizzie appear in the 1885 Census, Guelph Township, Sumner County. He’s 31 and a farmer, and she’s 27. In the 1895 Census, he’s 41 and a merchant, and she’s 39.

In the 1900 Census, he’s 46 (born March 1854) and works in (Illegible) Dry Goods. Lizzie is 44, and her mother America Stockton, 78, lives with the family. Their son Aubrey C. is 11 years old. The census was taken in Hunnewell and South Haven. Their children, known by and apart from censuses: Agnes L., William Thomas, Syrena Alice, Josephus, Aubrey Charles.

Martin’s probate says his daughter Agnes L. Ryland is 25 years old at his death on May 12, 1901; his son William T. is 22; his daughter S. Alice Wells is 19; and C. Aubrey is 13.

In an undated letter to Hannah Jane’s daughter Bessie May, Janie calls William “Willie” Ryland and mentions Lizzie. (Janie is Martin’s really young step-mother or his father’s second wife). Willie is most likely Martin’s and Lizzie’s son William Thomas, for the letter is too early for Lizzie’s marriage to William Kendall. Janie wrote a letter to Bessie in September 1902, and these two letters seem around the same time, discussing Bessie’s transition to higher education. For a transcription of the letters, visit the William Ryland and Hannah Jane post.

Go here to this marriage index, where Lizzie’s marriage to William A. Kendall is recorded. Scroll down to Sumner County and click on “R” for Ryland:

http://www.genwed.com/state/ksgen.htm

One researcher writes in an email about Martin’s death:

He was the picture of health, but he was bothered by very sweaty feet.  One day, a man came into Martin’s store and prescribed a certain concoction that he should put on his feet day and night. Well, it cut off his circulation and poisoned his blood, and ML was dead within two weeks. (John F. Ryland, October 26, 2008)

Martin Luther Ryland’s gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580686

Elizabeth (Lizzie) D. (Stockton Ryland) Kendall’s gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580696

Mae H. Ryland is the infant daughter of William Thomas Ryland, son of Martin Luther:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13412853&

Josephus is Martin Luther’s and Lizzie’s two-year-old son:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11876165

  1. William Kendall

He is not the same as William A. Kendall in #3! Rather, William Kendall Ryland was born on August 29, 1857, Boone County, Missouri. He married Amanda Ellen Stockton on September 2, 1875, in Randolph County, Missouri, daughter of Thomas Stockton and America Jacobs. Amanda was born about 1854 in Missouri and died January 4, 1929 in South Haven, Kansas; William Kendall died about April 9, 1939, in Billings, Noble County, Oklahoma.

More about them

The time and place of his birth are a little off. His parents William and Sarah moved to Missouri in fall 1857, yet he was born in that state in August 1857. This goes to show how fluid dates and places can be in family research. No one should be dogmatic about some things, unless he or she has ample evidence, and even then he or she should be open-minded.

For his marriage to Amanda Stockton, click here:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~randolphroots/marriages3.htm (scroll down to Ryland).

William and Amanda E. appear in the 1885 Census in Guelph Township, Sumner County, Kansas. He’s 27 and a merchant, and she’s 31. “Lattie” is 6 and Stockton is 1. They live next to Martin Luther Ryland and Lizzie.

In the 1900 Census, they live in White Rock, Noble County, Oklahoma. He’s 42 and a farmer, and Amanda is 46. Their children are Minnie L. (13) and Lola (4).

In the 1920 Census, he’s 62 and a farmer and works at a “general” trade or occupation, and Amanda’s 65. Their 22-year-old daughter Lola’s last name is now Boyd, and she has a daughter La May, 2 years and 10 months. No word on Lola’s husband, who probably died in 1918. They all live in the same house, Blackwell Township, Kay County, Oklahoma.

Finally, in the 1930 Census, taken in Braman Township, Kay County, Oklahoma, William, 72, lives with his second wife Emma D., 66. They own their home (and presumably a farm) valued at $4000.00. Their children, known both from and apart from the censuses: Rosie, Lydia, Stockton, Minnie Lee, and Lola May.

William Kendall’s obituary:

Obit – Blackwell Daily Journal, Blackwell, Oklahoma – April 10, 1939

William K. Ryland

Braman, April 10 – Funeral services for William K. Ryland, 81, who died at his home six miles east of Billings Saturday afternoon following a short illness will be held at the Baptist church in Braman at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Burial will be in the South Haven Cemetery under the direction of Roberts mortuary.

Mr. Ryland was born Aug 29, 1857 in Boone County, Mo., and settled on a farm three miles north of Nardin after the opening of the Cherokee Strip.

He was a member of the Baptist Church.

Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Lottie Russell of Billings, Mrs. Minnie McGaha of Ponca City and Mrs. Lola B. McCants of Mulvane, Kans., five grandsons and grand-daughters.

William Kendall Ryland’s gravesite, in Billings, Noble County, Oklahoma:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=13412897

The obituary was recorded at that link.

Gravesite of Amanda Ellen Stockton, wife of William Kendall, in South Haven, Sumner County, Kansas:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580668

William and Amanda lost Stockton Ryland and Harvey Boyd (1897-1918).

Stockton Ryland’s gravestone:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580738

Lottie Ryland Russell’s grave marker:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=39665907

Lola Mae Ryland McCants

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15580130

Back in Missouri, William and Amanda lost Infant Ryland and Lydia Ryland, who lived a little under five months.

http://www.mytrees.com/ancestry-family/fi001130-267524-774852/Elizabeth-Stockton-Born-1856-in-Missouri.html

There’s a good write-up about William Kendall, at ancestry.com, here:

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/person.aspx?pid=-1292920301&tid=1095810

  1. Sarah (Sadie) Almira

She was born 1861 (tombstone) or May 1862 (1900 Census) in Missouri. Her death certificate says she was born May 18, 1860. She married John Henry Dingman on August 31, 1877 in Boone County, Missouri; he died in 1938. Sarah Almira (Ryland) Dingman married a second time to Cornelius A. Callahan on October 12, 1893, in Chautauqua County, Kansas. So it looks like she and Dingman got divorced. She died September 16, 1931 in Chautaqua City, Chautauqua County, Kansas. She was buried in McClarney Cemetery, and so was John Henry Dingman.

Mother and Daughter

Sarah & Delcia Dingman

Sarah Ryland Dingman and daughter Delcia Dingman

Photo taken in Akron, Ohio; they probably visited some Rylands back there, no doubt traveling by train.

More about them

She went by the nickname Sadie, and this name appears in many documents in Kansas and Oklahoma.

In the 1880 Census, John Henry and Sarah live in Saling Township, Audrain County, Missouri. He is named as H. Dingman (21), farming, and she is Sarah (19), keeping house. Their children Delcy (1) and Willie Arnold (12) appear.

Next, J. H. Dingman co-owned property with his father-in-law William, according to the 1883 Atlas on Sumner County, Kansas.

John Henry and Sarah A. appear in the Crescent, Logan County, First Oklahoma Territory Census of 1890, living next door to her sister Arminda Brown (“Armanda” in the census). John H. Dingman is the head of household (no. 62).

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/logan/census/1890/crescent.htm

Sarah’s much-younger half-sister Bessie May (Slim’s sister) says that Sarah married a rich part-Indian, which refers to Cornelius A. Callahan. The documents show that Sarah was much older than he.

In the 1900 Census, Sadie and Cornelius live on the Osage Indian Reservation, Oklahoma. She is said to be born in May 1863 and he is said to be born in February 1875. They have a servant Samuel Wietling (?) and his family (wife and three children) living with Cornelius and Sadie. Servants indicate wealth. Cornelius is recorded as being born in Indian Territory.

They appear in the 1905 Kansas State Census, in Chautauqua City, Chautauqua County, Kansas, as C. A. (30) and S. A. Callahan (43).

In the 1920 Census, Chautauqua City (Belleville Township is crossed out), Cornelius A. Callahan and Sadie A. appear. He’s 44 and his occupation is “none.” She’s 58. The census says his mother is from Virginia, which is at odds with the next census.

In the 1930 Census, Belleville Township, Chautauqua City, Chautauqua County, Cornelius A. is 55, and Sadie is 66. They own their own home (and presumably a farm), valued at $3000.00. He is said to have “mixed blood” and his mother comes from the Osage tribe, Oklahoma. At their first marriage (not their current one), the census says he was 20, and she was 16. Occupation is “none.”

Sarah’s first husband Henry Dingman appears in the 1930 Census, Belleville Township, Chautauqua County, Kansas, living with his daughter Delsie Edwards (51) and son-in-law Joe O. Edwards (45). Henry is 72.

Sarah’s death certificate says she died in Chautauqua County, in the township or city of Chautauqua. Her full name was Sadie Elmira Callahan. She’s a white female and married to C. A. Callahan. Her date of birth was May 18, 1860. She died September 16, 1931, at 8:20 a.m. of Carcinoma Hepatic (liver cancer), the onset of which was 1930. She was 71 years 3 months and 24 days old. The doctor (illegible name), of Sedan, Kansas, attended to her from July 1931 to September 15. She was born in Missouri; her father was Wm Ryland, who was born in Ohio. The informant was Mrs. E. C. Hessert, of Chautauqua, who says Sadie’s mother’s maiden name was Elmira (incorrect) and from Ohio. The undertaker was Baird – Westlake, in Sedan, Kansas.

This is John Henry Dingman’s place of burial in McClarney Cemetery, Chautauqua City, Chautauqua County, Kansas:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23477406&

Here’s Sarah’s final resting place in McClarney Cemetery:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23477327&

  1. Benjamin Frankin

He was born August 15, 1865. He married Mattie A. Strange on November 7, 1884, in Sumner County, Kansas, daughter of George W. and Malissa F. Strange. Mattie was born March 1862 in Kansas. Mattie is said to have been buried in Crescent Cemetery, Logan County, Oklahoma on November 17, 1930, so she died on that day or a day before then.

Here’s the link to the cemetery transcription showing Mattie’s (and others’) burial date:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/RYLAND/2002-10/1036016989

Go here to this marriage index, where their marriage is recorded. Scroll down to Sumner County and click on “R” for Ryland:

http://www.genwed.com/state/ksgen.htm

More about them

In a letter written by his (younger) stepmother Hannah Jane, she refers to him as Ben, so that’s probably the name he went by, in everyday life. He and his father (our William) moved to Sumner County, Kansas, March 3, 1883. Ben owned 320 acres in Sumner County, Kansas, which he later rented out. He went into the mercantile business with his brothers. The book Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma (read the excerpt below) says he pulled up stakes, sold his property, and moved to Oklahoma. He is a founder of Crescent, Oklahoma, back then called Crescent City.

He appears in the 1890 Crescent, Logan County, Oklahoma Territorial Census (the top):

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/logan/census/1890/crescent.htm

B. F. Ryland and Mattie A. appear in the 1885 Census, Guelph Township, Sumner County, Kansas. He is said to be 19, and she’s 23.

They appear in the 1900 Census, Crescent City, Logan County, Oklahoma. Their children are Frank A. (12), Orel C. (10), William E. (6), Forrest C. (2), and Harry C. (6 months). They also have a boarder Eugene M. Strange, who is likely Mattie’s brother or cousin. Ben is a farmer who owns his property.

In the 1910 Census, Crescent City, the same sons appear, some with different middle initials: Frank F. (22), Oral C. (20), William E. (16), Forrest Z. (12), and Harry C. (10) (censuses often make little errors like this). Ben is a farmer.

Benjamin’s death certificate says he died 9:30 p.m., October 9, 1925, of heart trouble. His place of death was Crescent, Logan County, Oklahoma. His date of birth is August 15, 1865, and he was aged 60 years, 1 month, and 27 days at his decease. His occupation was farmer. His birthplace is said to be Ohio, but his parents moved from there to Missouri in 1857. His father is Wm Ryland, who is recorded as born in Pennsylvania (he was actually born in Ohio) and mother Sarah Baird, who is recorded as born in New York. The informant was A. F. Ryland of Crescent. The physician who attended him was William A. Kendall of Crescent. Recall that he married the widow of Martin Luther Ryland (child #3, above). Dr. Kendall attended Benjamin from October 4, 1925 to October 8, 1925 and last saw him alive October 9. He was buried in Crescent Cemetery, October 11, 1925. The undertaker was Brook’s.

For an interesting link on Benjamin Ryland, his offspring, and the cemetery transcription, click here:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/RYLAND/2002-10/1036016989

Does anyone out there have more family traditions on these robust, prosperous, accomplished, and entrepreneurial pioneers named the Rylands? In Southern California, there is a Ryland real estate development company. It sure seems likely that these modern Rylands descend from one of the pioneers. Does anyone have that information?

Photo of the Benjamin Ryland Family

Benjamin Franklin Ryland

The handwriting on the back was done in very light pencil and on a chocolate-colored back. It doesn’t copy, and it’s difficult to read. But I transcribed it. The photo was mislabeled, probably by Bessie, as William Ryland and Hannah Jane Vickers Ryland, but that’s not even close. She was wrong about a lot of little things in her account of the Rylands, so I have no doubt she was wrong about the family in the photo. But her error is probably why it was acquired – she thought her brother Floyd (Frank / Slim) was in it.

Here’s what the chopped off writing says, line by line, with the parentheses indicating optional readings:

-orrest on (at) my left

-orry (-arry) at (on) mother right

-witt (mitt or with) back of wife

-rank behind mr

orel ” ” on left

The “o” and “a” look awfully similar, as if the writer didn’t make a sufficient down stroke for the handwritten “a,” as he went to the next letter.

Here are Benjamin Franklin Ryland’s five boys in birth order, per an ancestry register:

  1. Albert Frank
  2. Oral C.
  3. William
  4. Forrest V.
  5. Harry C.

Five boys here and in the photo? Plus, Frank / ‘-rank and orel are the oldest and the directions indicate where they are standing, and they look the oldest in the photo, The only mismatch is witt, which somehow could be, remotely, a nickname for William. Apart from this one difficulty, I think we have a match with the Ben Ryland family.

Go here for another look at names:

http://boards.ancestry.com.au/surnames.ryland/72.1.1/mb.ashx

Here’s what one of Benjamin’s descendants wrote about a family photo:

The picture you sent is of my great-grandfather, Benjamin Franklin Ryland, and my great-grandmother, Mattie Strange Ryland. Benjamin was born in Randolph County, MO to William Ryland, Jr and Sarah Baird. They moved from Ohio to Missouri.

Mattie is the daughter of George and Malissa Strange of Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky. Malissa’s maiden name is Collins which is where Orel, my father Robert Sr, me Robert Jr, and my son Robert, III, get our middle name.

The child to the left of Mattie I believe is Ben and Mattie’s youngest son, Harry C. Ryland. Harry married Dora Cowling and their only son was Father Raymond Ryland who was a married catholic priest (one of very few) and recently passed away in March 2014 in Steubenville, OH. Father Ray Ryland authored a book entitled “Drawn From Shadows Into Truth” where he mentions several stories about growing up in Crescent, OK, his service as a Naval Officer in WWII and then becoming a protestant minister and eventually a catholic priest. You can Google search for his obituary and read about his life and names of his descendants.

The child to the right of Benjamin is Forrest Ryland who owned a general store in Crescent, OK for many years. I believe the 3 sons in the back are from left-to-right are William, Albert Franklin, and Orel Collins (my grandfather).

I have read that Orel was the first baby born in Crescent, OK after Franklin, Mattie and young Albert Franklin made the land run of 1889 from South Haven, KS. They staked their claim in what later became Crescent, OK. Ben gave 40 acres of his land to the town of Crescent so they could create the town. It was originally known as Crescent City because of a crescent-shaped grouping of trees near where the town would begin.

Many Ryland descendants of William Jr and Benjamin are buried in Crescent Cemetery on the northeast side of town.

In fact, the east-west running, County Road 74, just south of town is named Ryland Rd.

Transcription ends.

To judge from this long section on William and Sarah’s children, they began in Missouri, moved to Kansas, and then settled in Oklahoma, for the most part. However, their parents William and Sarah Ryland started their young lives together back in Ohio.

Summary of These Six Children

Does anyone out there have more family traditions on these robust, prosperous, accomplished, and entrepreneurial pioneers named the Rylands?

Go here for another look at names:

http://boards.ancestry.com.au/surnames.ryland/72.1.1/mb.ashx

To judge from this long section on William and Sarah’s children, most began in Ohio, and others in Missouri; then they moved to Kansas, and many settled in Oklahoma. Their parents William and Sarah Ryland started their young lives together back in Ohio.

So let’s look at their fresh beginning, before their move to Missouri and his move to Kansas.

ASHLAND COUNTY, OHIO

For the early pioneers, land is the foundation of their economy and employment and very lives. So it comes first in William and Sarah’s life in Ohio.

Deeds

1 Perch = 1 rod = 5.50 yards = 16.5 feet = 5.029 meters

December 20, 1850

William Ryland Sr. and his Catherine sell 69 acres to their son William Ryland Jr., for $1700.00. William Jr. and Sarah (Baird) Ryland are newly married, so this purchase is their first one. They’re on their way to a new life as farmers, next door to his parents. Vol. 12, page 51.

The deed says:

Wm Ryland & wife

To

Wm Ryland Jr.

Know all men by these presents That we William Ryland & Catherine Ryland wife of said William Ryland for the consideration of seventeen hundred dollars received to ___ full satisfaction of William Ryland do give, grant, bargain, sell, and confirm unto William Ryland Jr. the following described Tract or Lot of Land, situate in the Township of Vermillion in the County of Ashland and State of Ohio, and known by

Commencing at the southwest corner of the southwest quarter of section twenty two township [careted in:] /twenty/ one Range sixteen, thence north 18.5 tenth [sic] perches to the County Road, thence East 160 perches to the cross roads, thence south along the east line of the northwest quarter of section 27 Township twenty one Range (16) eighty four & two tenths perches, then west 42 perches thence north East 24.5 perches along the State Road, thence west 129 & 5 tenths perches, thence north 45.7 & [?] perches to the place of beginning containing Sixty nine acres of Land.

To have and to hold the above granted and bargained premises with the appurtenances thereof, unto ____ the said William Ryland Jr. his heirs and assigns forever to them and to their own proper use and behoof.

And the said William Ryland & Catherine his wife do for themselves heirs executors and administrators covenant with the said William Ryland Jr. that at and untill [sic] the ensealing [sic] of these presents they are seized of the premises, as a good and indefeasible estate in fee simple and have good right to sell the same in manner and form above written and the same is free from all incumbrances [sic] whatsoever except roads.

And furthermore the said William Ryland & heirs do by these presents bind themselves and heirs forever to Warrant and Defend the above granted and bargained premises to the said William Ryland Jr. his heirs and assigns against all lawful claims and demands whatsoever.

And the said Catherine Ryland do hereby remise, release and forever quit claim unto the said William Ryland Jr. his heirs and assigns all my right and title of dower in the above described premises.

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seal this 20th day of Dec. A.D. 1850.

Signed, Sealed Acknowledged and Delivered in Presence of

David Cipher

Susan Ryley

Wm Ryland (seal)

Catherine (X) Ryland (seal)

The State of Ohio Ashland County, ss

Be it remembered That on the twentieth day of Dec. A.D. 1850 before me the subscriber came William Ryland & Catherine his wife the signer and sealer of the above and then and there acknowledged the same to be their free act and deed for the uses and purposes therein expressed. And the said Catherine Ryland wife of the said William Ryland having been by me examined separate and apart from her said husband and the contents of the above deed having been by me to her fully explained and made known, she declared that she did of her own free will and accord sign seal and acknowledge the same without fear of or coercion from her said husband and that she is still satisfied therewith.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my name and office at Haysville the day and year last above written

David Cipher, Justice of the Peace

Filed for Record July 21st A.D. 1855

Recorded Aug. 9th A. D. 1855

Transcription ends.

April 3, 1855

William Jr. and Sarah Ryland sell 69 acres to Daniel Harmon for $2100.00. This sale clears the way for their move to Missouri in fall 1857. So where did they live during the two year interval? It is possible that Harmon allowed them to stay on the land, or they lived with his or her parents. The records do not show (or I have been unable to find) other land that William owned in Vermillion Township, Ashland County. Vol. 12, p. 52.

The deed says:

Wm Ryland Jr. & wife

To

Daniel Harmon

Know all men by these presents that we William Ryland & Sarah Ryland wife of said William Ryland of the County of Ashland & State of Ohio in consideration of twenty one hundred dollars to us in hand paid by Daniel Harmon of the same place have bargained & sold & do hereby grant, bargain, sell & convey unto the said Daniel Harmon his heirs and assigns forever the following premises tract or parcel of Land situate in the Township of Vermillion in the County of Ashland & State of Ohio and described & known by

Commencing at the south west corner of the south west quarter of section twenty two Township Twenty one & Range sixteen, Thence north 18.5 perches to the County Road, Thence East 160 perches to the cross roads Thence south along the East line of the north west quarter of section 27 Township twenty one and Range (16) Eighty five & two tenths perches thence west 42 perches, thence north east 24.5 perches along the State Road thence west 129 perches & 5 tenths, Thence north 45.7 perches to the place of beginning, containing Sixty nine acres of Land.

To have and to hold said premises with the appurtenances unto the said Daniel Harmon his heirs and assigns forever. And the said William Ryland for himself and heirs doth hereby covenant with said Daniel Harmon his heirs and assigns that he is lawfully seized of the premises aforesaid that they are free and clear of all incumberances [sic] whatsoever. And that he will forever Warrant and Defend the same with the appurtenances unto the said Daniel Harmon his heirs and assigns against the lawful claims of all persons whomsoever.

In Testimony whereof the said William Ryland & Sarah Ryland have hereunto set their hands and seals this 3rd day of April, A.D. 1855.

Executed In Presence of

Geo. Buchanan

John W. Hager [?]

Wm Ryland

Sarah Ryland

State of Ohio

Ashland County, ss

Before me Geo. Buchanan a Justice of the Peace in and for the County aforesaid personally appeared the above named Wm Ryland & Sarah Ryland his wife & signed and sealed the above instrument of conveyance & acknowledged the same to be their voluntary act and deed for the purposes therein described. And the said Sarah Ryland being be examined at the same time by me separate and apart from her said husband and the contents thereof being made known to her declared she did voluntarily sign and seal the same without compulsion from her said husband & she is still satisfied therewith, this 3rd day of April A.D. 1855.

Geo. Buchanan, Justice of the Peace

Filed for Record July 21st A.D. 1855.

Recorded Aug. 9th A.D. 1855.

Transcription ends.

1850 Census Record

1850

I don’t know who eleven-year-old John Richabaugh was. William sent him to school. In this census, but not included in this table, William Sr. lived next to William Jr. (our Frank Ryland’s father) before William Jr. moved to Missouri and then to Kansas. So Jr. and Sr. had neighboring farms.

 

1850 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio

Names Age Sex Color Occupation Value: Real, Personal POB Married Within  Year Attend School Within Year
William Ryland 22 M Farmer 1,500 OH Yes
Sarah 18 F Yes
Arminda 7/12 F
John Richabaugh 11 M Yes
Dwelling no. in order of visitation: 251; Family no. in order of visitation: 257; enumerated the 14th day of September.  No slaves are marked for either farm, and the census taker left “Color” blank.

MOVE TO MISSOURI

William and Sarah Ryland left Ashland County, Ohio, and relocated to Boone County, Missouri, in fall 1857 and then to adjoining Randolph County. Recall that he had sold his property back in Ashland County, in April 1855, so the way was clear for the move to Missouri.

William’s older brother John and his wife Mary Ann (Dally) Ryland and their children went with them. John and Mary Ann appear in the 1860 Census, near Renick Township, Randolph County, aged 44 (birth = 1816, a match with his known birth year) and Mary Ann (45). Their children: Mary R. (19), Armstrong (18), Nathan (14), Emaline (12), Wilson (8), John (7), George (7), Amanda (5), Benton (3 ½).

However, due to the outbreak of the Civil War, John and Mary Ann moved back to Ashland County in fall 1861 with their kids, except their son William Armstrong, who remained. William Armstrong’s son was murdered in Boone County, Missouri.

In the following excerpt, N. D. Ryland is Nathan David, John and Mary Ann’s son and our William’s nephew. Here’s the write up on the family’s move and return:

N. D. RYLAND was born in Knox county, Ohio, February 19, 1846. His parents [John and Mary Ann Ryland] came to Ashland county about the year 1850, and bought a farm about a mile and a half south of Hayesville, where they remained until the fall of 1857, when they sold their farm and emigrated to Randolph county, Missouri. In the fall of 1861 they returned to Ohio, and bought a farm one mile south of Hayesville. (Source: History of Ashland County).

William and Sarah remained in Boone and Randolph Counties and raised a successful family.  William moved to Kansas with his youngest son on March 3, 1883, after the death of his wife Sarah in May 1882, and after his grown kids moved out there, except Benjamin Franklin Ryland, William’s youngest, who accompanied his father to Kansas.

However, the cemetery index for Randolph County, Missouri, says that her date of death is May 17, 1883, which is one year too late.

Why too late? Let’s set up this timeline.

  1. William buys property in Sumner County, Kansas, on October 5, 1882 (see the deed in William Ryland and Hannah Jane Vickers post).
  2. According to Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma (read the excerpt below), he and his father moved to Sumner County, Kansas, on March 3, 1883. The book also says Benjamin’s mother Sarah had died back in Missouri. This means she died before March 1883.
  3. However, Sarah (supposedly) dies on May 17, 1883, in Missouri.
  4. William her husband marries Hannah Jane Vickers in Sumner County, Kansas, on December 4, 1883.

It takes a while to move from one state to a neighboring one in the 1880s. Let’s ignore, for a moment, the history that says William and Benjamin got to Sumner County in March 1883. This means as soon as Sarah is buried in Missouri (allegedly) in May 1883, William rushes home, loads up the wagon (or wagons) and scampers off to Kansas. Let’s say he gets there in June. Then he meets Hannah Vickers, courts her, and marries her on December 4, 1883. That’s a “grieving” husband for you! However, add all of the factors together, and May 17, 1882 (not 1883) is the correct date of Sarah’s death, and William moved to Kansas in March 1883.

Before William’s move to Kansas, however, the William and Sarah Ryland family lived for over two decades in Boone and Randolph Counties, Missouri.

That’s the subject of the next two sections.

BOONE AND RANDOLPH COUNTIES, MISSOURI

Here’s a quick write-up.

The county of Boone was formed on 16 November 1820 as a territorial county emerging from the vastly larger territorial county of Howard and for a time being known as part of “Boone’s Lick Country.” This county was named in honor of the famous Kentucky explorer, Daniel Boone, who spent his latter years in eastern Missouri. Note that the early records of the area use both spellings: Boone and Boon., click here.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~moboone2/#BoCoMohistory

For a longer history on the founding of Boone County, go here:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~moboone2/founding.htm

History of Boone County (1882)

Online Randolph County Map:

http://www.argenweb.net/randolph/randolphmap.jpg

Drawing of Two Farms in Boone County, Missouri

Rylands in Boone Co. MO 1

Those drawings were done after the Civil War.

Randolph County Township 52 and Ranges

Rylands in Randolph Co MO

William Ryland and his sons Martin Luther and Marion Lucius live in the bottom right sections.

Source: An Illustrated Historical Atlas of Randolph County Missouri, 1876.

Boone County Township (partial image)

Rylands in Boone Co MO 3

William Ryland lives at the very top, third section to the left. So he owned property in both counties, close enough together to manage.

Source: An Illustrated Historical Atlas of Boone County, Missouri, 1875, reprinted by the Genealogical Society of Central Missouri, 1991.

Land Transactions and Censuses

John and William were brothers.

Indirect Index (Buyer)

Name ……….. Date …… Book …Page

John ………. 22 May 1859 .. 31…… 201

William ……16 Aug 1864 …30 ……144

William …… 7 May 1864 … 34 ……146

William …… 26 Nov 1866 … 36 ….. 21

Wm et al ……1 Apr 1868 …..39…….101

Wm et al ….. 16 Jul 1869 …… 41 ….. 34

Direct Index (Seller)

Name ………  Date ……… Book …. Page

William …… 12 Feb 1861…..31 …….18

John …………18 Aug 1865….34 …….108

William………7 Jan 1867 ….. 36 ……. 49

William……. 26 Feb 1868 …. 37…….124

William ……. 22 Jun 1865 …. 38 …… 397

Wm et al……. 26 Feb 1869 ….. 41…….142

William Ryland made a lot of purchases. His brothers John and James also figure in this large section. Recall, though, that John moved back to Ohio, in 1861, due to the Civil War (1861-1865) in Missouri. James probably moved back then, too.

William Ryland made a lot of purchases. His brothers John and James also figure in this section. Recall, though, that John moved back to Ohio, in 1861, due to the Civil War (1861-1865) in Missouri.

September 15, 1857

Sturgeon, Boone County. James Ryland’s wife Catherine E. J. Ryland purchases a lot in town for $50.00, from Jas D. Patton, A. H. Wayne, and James E. Hicks (trustees of Sturgeon Depot Company), and their wives Minerva E. Patton, Cynthia G. Wayne, and Elizabeth Hicks. The location of the property is as follows (Book 30, pages 52-53):

Lot no. 1, in Block no. 53, in the town of Sturgeon “Said Lot fronting ___ [sic] feet, running back ___ [sic] feet”

Most significantly for our purposes, in the margin of the deed the clerk writes:

Taken by Wm Ryland August 15, 1860

This James Ryland is our William’s younger brother. However, James and family appear in the 1860 Census, back in Ashland County, Ohio. So we have two options: James and family made the trip out to Missouri with his brothers John and William in 1857, and promptly went back to Ohio before the 1860 Census was taken; or Catherine E. J. Ryland used an agent to purchase this lot, so they did not have to come out to Missouri. Either way, William Ryland “took” it on August 15, 1860.

That date should be coordinated with the next deed.

February 23, March 2, November 22, 1860

Boone County. William Ryland and his partners or business associates had a verdict rendered against them. The Circuit Court favored Simeon S. Graves. To compensate him, real estate and its steam mill were sold at auction. Graves bought the land for $500.00 and the mill for $40.00. The 1860 Census shows that William indeed lived on property with a mill on it, hiring two young men to help him. Is this the mill that was given up? (Book 31, pp. 18-19)

Since this deed is so unusual, it is transcribed here, while the others that follow are summarized.

The deed says:

No 2. Ex’d [?]

To all to whom these presents shall come, I Jno M Samuel, Sheriff of the County of Boone, State of Missouri, send greeting,

Whereas, on the 23rd day of February in the year of our Lord 1860, a judgment was rendered in the Circuit Court of the County of Boone in favor of Simeon S. Graves, against Thomas W. & Elizabeth F. Baker, Vardeman & Mary Riley, Wm H Calloway, Wm Ryland, James Seely, and Ulysses Seely, for the sum of Eleven hundred and sixteen & 66/100 Dollar for debt and one hundred & seventeen & 10/100 Dollars for damages and costs; upon which judgments & special execution issued from the Clerks office of said Court in favor of the said Simeon S. Graves, against the said Tho’s W. & Elizabeth F. Baker, Vardeman & Mary Riley, W. H. Calloway, Wm Ryland, James Seely, & Ulysses Seely dated 2nd day of March 1860, directed to the Sheriff of the County of Boone, and the same was to me delivered on the 2nd day of March 1860, by virtue of which said execution I did, on the 2nd day of March 1860, levy upon and seize all of the right title and interest of the said Thomas W. & Elizabeth Baker, Vardeman & Mary Riley, W. H. Calloway, James Seely & Ulysses Seely [William Ryland is missing] in and to the following described real estate situate in my said County, to wit:

The North West quarter of the South East quarter, the east half of the North West quarter, the West half of the North East quarter, the East half of the South west quarter, the West half of the South West quarter of section twenty two and the East half of the South east quarter of section twenty one all in township fifty one Range thirteen in Boone County Missouri with the steam mill therein situate;

And having previous to the day of sale herein after mentioned given at least twenty days notice of the time and place of sale and of the real estate to be sold and where situate as the law direct by advertisement in the Missouri Statesman a newspaper printed in my said County.

By Virtue of which said execution and notice I did on the 22nd day of November 1860, between the hours of nine in the forenoon and five in the afternoon of that day agreeably to said notice at the Court House door in my said County of Boone, during the Session of the Circuit Court of my said County at the November tern thereof, for the year 1860, expose to sale at the public auction to the highest bidder for ready money all the right, title, interest and estate of the said Thomas W & Elizabeth F Baker, Vardeman & Mary Riley, William H Calloway, William Ryland, James Seely and Ulysses Seely, in and to the above described real estate and Simeon S. Graves being the highest and last bidder, at the sum of Five hundred dollars for the land, and the sum of Four hundred Dollars for the Mill, the same were stricken off and sold to the said Simeon S. Graves for that sum.

Now therefore, in consideration of the premises and of the said sums of Five hundred and Four hundred /100 Dollars to me the Sheriff in hand paid by the said Simeon S. Graves (the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge) and by virtue of the authority in me vested by law, I Jno M. Samuel, Sheriff as aforesaid, do hereby assign, transfer and convey to the said Simeon S. Graves all the right, title, interest, and estate of the said Thomas W & Elizabeth Baker, Vardeman & Mary Riley, Wm H. Calloway, Wm Ryland, James Seely & Ulysses Seely of, in and to the above described property, that I might sell as Sheriff as aforesaid by virtue of the aforesaid execution and notice.

To have and to hold the right, title, interest and estate hereby conveyed unto the said Simeon Graves, his heirs and assigns forever with all rights and appurtenances thereunto belonging. In virtue whereof I Jno M Samuel, Sheriff of the County of Boone, have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this the 24th day of November A. D. 1860.

Jno M. Samuels Sheriff (seal)

State of Missouri Sct [?]

County of Boone

Boone Circuit Court November Term 1860

Be it remembered that on this day personally came into open Court, John M. Samuel, Sheriff of Boone County, aforesaid, who was personally known to the Judge of said Court to be the person whose name is subscribed to the foregoing deed, as a party thereto; and acknowledged the same to be his act and deed, as such Sheriff, for the purposes therein mentioned; which was ordered to be certified, and is here done accordingly.

In testimony whereof I hereto set my hand and affix the seal of said Court, at office in Columbia, November 30 A.D. 1860 (seal) R. S. Todd Clerk

State of Missouri Sct [?]

County of Boone

This Deed from John M. Samuel Sheriff to Simeon S. Graves, was produced before me, Clerk of the Circuit Court, and ex-officio Recorder for Boone County, on the Twelfth day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and Sixty one; and with the certificate thereon endorsed is duly recorded in Book No. 31, pages 18-19. Given under my hand as Recorder aforesaid, with the seal of said Court hereto affixed, at office in Columbia, on this day and year aforesaid.

(seal) R S Todd Clerk & Recorder

N.B In this deed “Special” is interlined “and” erased.

Transcription ends.

1860 Census

Albert Bard and James Cross are hired hands from Ohio, William and Sarah’s home state. Albert Bard or Baird is Sarah’s younger brother.

William owned a mill, as his father did back in Ohio. But no doubt he also farmed and employed Albert and James in the mill and on the farm. Finally, the census taker bungled Arminda Eunice’s name. He smoothed it in his mind to Amanda U. It’s somewhat understandable that he would absentmindedly write Amanda, but didn’t he know how to spell Eunice?

 

1860 Census of the United States

Bourbon Township, Boone County, Missouri

Names Age Sex Color Occupation Value: Real, Pers. POB Ed; Married within year Health
Wm Ryland 32 M Mill Owner 2700 (real)

2400 (pers)

OH
Sarah — 29 F
Amanda U [sic] — 11 Attend school within year
Lucas 9 M Yes
Martin L 7 Yes
William K 4 MO
Albert Bard 18 Laborer OH
James L Cross 21  —
Dwelling house no. in order of visitation: 645; Family no in order of visitation 712; enumerated 2nd day of August 1860.

August 31, 1863

Boone County. William Ryland buys unspecified acreage for $175.00, paid on the day of sale, from Hansen Canada and his wife Eliza J. Canada. The land is located as follows:

The northeast quarter of the northeast quarter of Section 4, Township 51, and Range 13.

Hansen signs his name, while the clerk indicates Eliza made her mark. On the 31st day of August Eliza affirms that she had agreed to the sale, willingly (standard procedure for the wife). The deed was recorded November 14, 1865, Book 34, pages 145-46.

September 4, 1863

Boone County. Riley Brown and his wife Nancy C. Brown buy three tracts of land, totaling 130 acres from William Ryland for $100.00, which was paid on the day of sale. The land is located

In the northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 6, Township 51, Range 12; and the northeast quarter of the northeast quarter of Section 1, Township 51, Range 13; and the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of Section 4, Township 50, on Range 13.

Riley Brown signs the deed, while Nancy C. Brown makes her mark. September 12, 1863, she affirms that she agreed to the sale willingly and without compulsion (standard procedure for the wife). The county clerk recorded the deed on November 14, 1865, Book 34, pages 143-44.

November 5, 1863; November 22, 1863; February 13, 1864; July 18, 1864

Sturgeon, Boone County, and Audrain County, Missouri. William Ryland serves as Marshall of the Court of Common Pleas, in a lawsuit; he was required to put up public notices and sell property at an auction. The clerk recorded the deed July 11, 1867 in Book 37, pages 141-143. It is transcribed here because it is unique in regards to William.

The deed says:

To all to whom these presents shall come: I William Ryland of the district of Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas, State of Missouri, send greeting:

Whereas, on the 5th day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand and sixty-three, a judgment was rendered in the Circuit Court of the County of Audrain in favor of Preston B. Reed against James Brown, Thomas Brown, and Hansen Canada, for the sum of three hundred and ten dollars for his debt, and one hundred and sixty-nine dollars and forty-seven cts for his damages, upon which judgment and execution issued from the clerk’s office of said court, in favor of the said Preston B. Reed against said James Brown, Thomas Brown, and Hansen Canada, dated 22 day of November AD 1863, directed to the Marshall of the Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas and the same [cut off in copying on top of page 142] late of the said James Brown of, in and to the following described real estate situate in my said district, to wit:

Lots No. 67 and 8 in Brock [sic, read: Block] No. 24; also lot No. ten 10 in Block No. 53

And having previously to the day of sale hereinafter mentioned given at least twenty days notice of the time and place of sale of the real estate to be sold and where situate as the law direct, by at least six handbills signed by me the said Marshall and put up in public places in different parts of my said district; by virtue of which said execution and notice I did on the 13th day of February 1864 between the hours of nine in the forenoon and five in the afternoon of that day agreeable to said notice in front of the  Masonic Hall in the City of Sturgeon in my said district during the session of the Court of Common Pleas, February Term Term [sic], for the year one thousand and sixty-four, expose to sale at public auction, for ready money all the right, title, interest, and estate of the said James Brown [other names not listed], of, in, and to the above described real estate; and Hansen Canada being the highest and last bidder for said real estate at the price and sum of ten dollars, the same was stricken off and sold to the said Hansen Canada for that sum;

Now therefore in consideration of the premises and of the said sum of ten dollars to me the said Marshall in hand payed [sic] by the said Hansen Canada, the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge; and by virtue of the authority in me vested by law, I William Ryland, Marshall as aforesaid, do hereby assign, transfer, and convey to the said Hansen Canada all the right and estate of the said James Brown of, in, and to the above described property that I might sell as Marshall as aforesaid, by virtue of the aforesaid execution and notice to have and to hold the right, title in – [sic] and estate hereby conveyed unto the said Hansen Canada, his heirs and assigns forever, with all rights and appurtenances thereto belonging;

In witness whereof, I William Ryland, Marshall of the Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas, have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal, this the 18 day of July 1864.

William Ryland, Marshall of the Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas (seal)

State of Missouri

County of Boone

Be it remembered that on this eighteenth day of July 1864, before me the undersigned clerk of the Sturgeon Court of Common Peas, in and for the county and state aforesaid came William Ryland Marshall of the Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas, who is personally known to me to be the same whose name is subscribed to the foregoing deed and in open court acknowledged the same to be his act and deed as such Marshall, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and affixed the seal of said court at office in Sturgeon, in the day and year last above written.

(seal) S. F. Cross, Clerk S. C. C. P. [Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas]

State of Missouri sct [sic]

County of Boone

This deed from William Ryland, Marshall, Sturgeon Court of Common Pleas, to H Canada, was produced before me Clerk of the the [sic] Circuit Court and Ex-officio Recorder for Boone County on the 11th day of July in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, and with the certificate thereon endorsed is duly recorded in Book No. 37, pages 141-2-3. Given under my hand as recorder aforesaid with the seal of said court hereto affixed at office in Columbia on this day and year aforesaid.

(seal) Jno. M. Samuel

Clerk and Recorder

Transcription ends.

Our William’s nephew, William Armstrong Ryland, was 21 and 22 in 1863 and 1864, so legally he could be the Marshall in this deed. But preference is given his Uncle (our) William in this case, merely because Armstrong seems too young. But anything is possible.

May 4, 1864

Boone County. William B. Cross and his wife Mary Jane Cross sell to William Ryland 38 acres for $150.00, which was paid on the day of sale. The land is located, as follows:

Northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 2, Township 51, Range 13.

Mary Jane affirms she agreed to the sale willingly, on the same date (standard procedure). The deed was recorded November 14, 1865, Book 34 pages 147-48. It should be noted, however, that John Ryland’s son William Armstrong Ryland (not our William, but his nephew) was about 22 years old in 1864, so he could have purchased this land. In my view, though, this is our William, because the 1860 Census (above) shows a James L. Cross working for our William, so the sellers William B. and Mary Jane Cross in this deed are probably his parents.

May 7, 1864

Boone County. James M. Butts and his wife Mary Ann Butts sell to William Ryland 40 acres for $142.00, which was paid on the day of sale. The land is located, as follows:

Southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 2, Township 51, Range 13.

On that same date, the couple acknowledged this deed to be theirs, and she affirms she agreed to the sale willingly (standard procedure). The deed was recorded November 14, 1865, Book 34, pages 146-47.

It should be noted, however, that John Ryland’s son, William Armstrong Ryland (not our William, but his nephew) was about 22 years old in 1864, so he could have purchased this land, but in my view this purchase was done by our William, because of the location of this land (see the explanation at the deed dated May 4, 1864, above, and note the location of the land in that deed).

August 10, 1864

Ashland County, Ohio, Boone County, and Randolph County, Missouri. John Ryland and Mary Ann his wife sell to his younger brother William Ryland 160 acres for $2000.00, which was paid on the day of sale. The land is located in both Missouri counties,

In the east half of the southeast quarter of Section 36, Township 52, Range 13; also the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 4 of Township 51, Range 13.

Bill (?) and Wm McNeil are the witnesses; John Ryland signs his name, while the clerk indicates Mary Ann made her mark. She affirms that she agreed to the sale willingly, without compulsion, on August 11, 1864 (standard procedure for the wife). Recorded November 14, 1865, Book 34, pages 144-45.

It should be noted, however, that John’s son William Armstrong Ryland (not our William, but his nephew), was about 22 years old in 1864, so he could have purchased the 160 acres from his father. Recall that William Armstrong stayed behind in Missouri, while his family moved back to Ohio. But in my view this purchase was done by our William Ryland, for William Armstrong seems too young to handle 160 acres and to have $2000.00, paid at the time of sale. Would a bank extend such a large line of credit to a young man?

July 17, 1865

Boone County. Simeon S. Graves sells to William Ryland an unspecified acreage of land, for $600.00, which was paid at the time of sale (Book 34, pages 148-49). The location of the land is as follows:

Northwest quarter of the southeast quarter; and the east half of the northwest quarter and the west half of the northeast quarter; and the east half of the southwest quarter, all in Section 22, Township 51, Range 13.

This is the same Simeon S. Graves who won a lawsuit against William Ryland and others, in February 1860 (see above). Now William buys land from him. So after five years, there were no hard feelings.

December 7, 1866

Boone County. William and Sarah Ryland sell two tracts of land, totaling 200 acres, to Thomas W. Baker, for $500.00.

The northeast of the northwest [sic] – the west half of the southeast and the northwest of the southeast quarter of Section twenty-two (22); also the southwest of the northeast quarter of Section fourteen (14), all in Township fifty-one (51), Range thirteen (13).

Sarah Ryland is said to agree to the sale, without compulsion (standard procedure), on February 7, 1866, before S. F. Cross, notary public, in Sturgeon. R. S. Todd recorded the deed in Book 36, pages 49-51.

February 26, 1869

Randolph and Boone County. William and Sarah Ryland of Randolph County, and John D. and Mary Burkhalter of Boone County sell 80 acres to William Chadwick, for $100.00.

The east half (1/2) of the S.E. qr [quarter] of Section Two (2) Township Fifty (50), Range Thirteen (13).

All four sellers are said to sign their names, not using a mark. Sarah and Mary are said to agree to the sale, without compulsion (standard procedure), on February 26, 1869, before S. F. Cross, notary public, in Sturgeon. John W. Samuel recorded the deed on November 12, 1869, in Book 41, page 142.

1870 Census

In the “Color” column, Abe Hubbard is marked with the letter M, meaning “Mulatto.” He could not read or write. So the Ryland family hired an ex-slave or son of an ex-slave to serve in the home.

 

1870 Census of the United States

Prairie Township, Randolph County, Missouri

Post Office: Moberly

Names Age Sex Color Occupation Value: Real, Personal Origins
Ryland, W. 46 M W Farmer 4000 (real) 600 (pers) Ohio
— Sarah 37 F W Keeping House Ohio
— Marion 18 M W Works on farm Ohio
— Martin 16 M W Works on farm Ohio
— William K 13 M W Works on farm Mo
— Sarah L 9 F W Mo
— Ben F 4 M W Mo
Hubbard, Abe 14 M M Dom servant Mo
Names (cont.) Education Male, US Citizen +21
Ryland, W. Yes
— Sarah
— Marion Attended school within last year
— Martin Yes
— William K Yes
— Sarah L Yes
— Ben F
Hubbard, Abe [?] Cannot read, write
Page 48; dwelling no. in order of visitation: 315; family no. in order of visitation: 312. Enumerated on 25th day of August 1870.

 

August 25 (or 26), 1870

Boone County. William Ryland and Michael Otto buy 20 acres for $300.00 from John A. Roberts and Angie (or Augie) H. Roberts. The land is located

In the east part northwest of the northwest of section 34, Township 51, Range 12.

Angie H. Roberts affirms that she willingly agreed to the sale, without compulsion from her husband. The county clerk recorded the deed November 30, 1870, Book 41, page 632.

It should be noted, however, that John Ryland’s son William Armstrong Ryland (not our William, but his nephew) was old enough to buy this land, so this purchase could be his. But in my view our William struck this deal.

January 30, 1872

Boone County, Missouri. William Ryland buys an unspecified acreage of land for $15.00 from John M (or W) Samuel and his wife Elenora B. Samuel, located

In the southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of section 26, Township 51, Range 12.

Elenora is stated as willingly giving up her dower, without compulsion from her husband (standard procedure for the wife, in those days). The deed was recorded on February 24, 1872, Book 42, page 553.

In the left bottom corner is written “taken J (illegible) Rucker 3 5 1872,” probably 3rd May 1872 (or March 5, 1872). Recall that Floyd’s (Frank / Slim’s) middle name was Rucker. It could be that his father William knew the Rucker family very well back in Missouri and honored them by naming his son after them, even though William had moved out to Kansas by early 1883 and Floyd was born in 1884. Link

This leads me away from the conclusion that William Armstrong Ryland (our William’s nephew) made this purchase. It is most likely our William Ryland’s transaction.

Randolph County Map 1895

Boone County is to the southeast, where Sturgeon is located.

Source: http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/MO/County/randolph.htm

Source: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~morandol/twp.htm

1880 Census

In this census the category “Health” means “Maimed, crippled, bedridden or otherwise disabled,” and it is marked for William. Maybe Sarah’s name should be marked. After all, she’ll die May 17, 1882. Anyway, if it is marked correctly as is, what was wrong with William? In about two years, after Sarah dies, he will move across the country to Kansas and prosper as a farmer, so his health could not be that bad. Maybe Benjamin his son, 14 years old, did the heavy lifting on the Missouri farm. Also, Martin Luther, another of William’s son, lived in dwelling no. 290 and is listed as family no. 313, so father and son lived one farm or dwelling away from each other. Surely he helped his father, if he was disabled in some way. In the census Martin is stated as being a farmer (26 years old), and his wife’s name is Lizzie (24), and their daughter is Agnes (4), and their son is William T (1). So William and Sarah are already grandparents. He will become a new father with Frank (born 1884) and Bessie (born 1886), after he moves to Kansas. Finally, William and Sarah liked to hire housekeepers (also see the 1870 Census). To me, this indicates that they were prosperous and the house was big. Maybe this also indicates that it was Sarah’s health that was declining, though William will also die in a mere eight years, but not before marrying on December 4, 1883, in Kansas, a woman much younger than he and fathering Frank and Bessie.

 

1880 Census of the United States

Prairie Township, Randolph County, Missouri

Names Color Sex Age Relationship Marital Status Occupation
Ryland, William W M 52 Married Farmer
— Sarah W F 48 Wife Married Keeping House
— Benjamin W M 14 Son Single Farm hand
Roberts Lucinda W F 14 Hired Single House keeper
Names (cont.) Health Education Place of Birth Father’s POB Mother’s POB
Ryland, William Marked Attended school within year OH PA MD
— Sarah OH NY PA
— Benjamin MO OH OH
Roberts Lucinda Cannot read, write MO MO MO
Page 35; Dwelling no.: 289; Family no.: 311; enumerated 22 & 23 day of June 1880; received July 26, 1880.

WILLIAM’S MOVE TO SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS

The next two deeds show a link between Boone County, Missouri, and Sumner County, Kansas. In the previous section, however, William is seen living in Randolph County. So is there a mistake? Randolph and Boone Counties border each other, so maybe William Ryland still had some property in Boone.

October 5, 1882. William Ryland and his son Martin Luther (Frank / Slim’s father and much older half-brother, though Slim is not yet born) buy 160 acres of land from Franklin and Nancy E. Bridges, for $1600.00. Recall that William arrived in Sumner County in March 1883, and Martin was a clerk for the school board in 1881 in Sumner County. So William used his son as an agent to buy the property.

Since this deed is transitional, it is transcribed here, and so is the next one.

The deed says:

DEED RECORD.

This Indenture made this 5th day of October AD 1882 between Franklin Bridges and Nancy E Bridges by Willis Bridges their attorney in fact of Chafee County in the State of Colorado of the first part, and William Ryland and Martin L Ryland of Boone County, and State of Missouri of the second part:

Witnesseth, that said parties of the first part, in consideration of the sum of sixteen hundred (1600) DOLLARS, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do by these presents, Grant, Bargain, Sell and Convey unto said parties of the second part, their heirs and assigns, all the following described REAL ESTATE, situated in the County of Sumner, and State of Kansas, to wit:

South West quarter (1/4) Section Twenty-seven (27) Township Thirty-four (34) South of Range One (1) East of 6’ principal meridian, containing one hundred and sixty (160) acres according to U.S. Survey thereof

This grant given subject to one certain mortgage of $800 which the said party of the second part hereby assume and is considered part of the purchase money of said tract.

To Have and to Hold the Same, together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise appertaining forever: And said Franklin Bridges and Nancy E. Bridges for themselves & their heirs, executors or administrators, do hereby covenant, promise and agree to and with said parties of the second part, that at the delivery of these presents they are lawfully seized in their own right, of an absolute and indefensible estate of inheritance in fee simple, of and in all and singular the above granted and described premises, with the appurtenances – that the same are free, clear, discharged and unincumbered of and from all former and other grants, titles, charges, estates, judgments, taxes, assessments, and incumbrances, of what nature or kind soever; and that they will WARRANT AND FOREVER DEFEND the same unto said parties of the second part their heirs and assigns against said parties of the first part, their heirs and assigns against said parties of the first part their heirs and all and every person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim the same.

In Witness Whereof, the said parties of the first part have thereunto set their hands the day and year first written above written.

Franklin Bridges

Nancy E. Bridges

By Willis Bridges their attorney in fact

State of Kansas, Sumner County, ss.

Be It Remembered, That on this 5th day of October A.D. 1882, before me the undersigned a Notary Public in and for the County and State aforesaid came Franklin Bridges & Nancy E. Bridges his wife by Willis Bridges their atty in fact who are personally known to me to be the same persons who executed the within instrument of writing and such persons duly acknowledged the execution of the same.

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Notarial seal, the day and year last above written.

[Notarial Seal]

D. C. Millard Notary Public

Commission expires Aug 12’ 1884

The instrument of which the foregoing is a true copy, was filed for record the 5’ day of October A. D. 1882, at 3 o’clock P.M.

T. A. Hubbard, Register of Deeds

Transcription ends.

October 30, 1882

William Ryland and his son-in-law John Henry Dingman (married Sarah Ryland) buy 160 acres from Carl Frederickson, for $1200.00.

So Carl sold land to his future wife Hannah Jane Vicker’s future first husband. Carl will be her second husband and she will be his first wife.

The whole thing works out like this:

  1. William married Sarah Baird, in February 1849, in OH; they move to Missouri in fall 1857.
  2. Sarah dies in May 1882, back in Missouri; so William is free to move to Kansas, to join most of his kids, by March 1883. His youngest Benjamin Franklin helped him move.
  3. Carl Frederickson, a single man, sells land to William on October 30, 1882 (see the next deed)
  4. William marries Hannah Jane Vickers in December 1883. They have Floyd (Frank / Slim) (1884) and Bessie May (1886).
  5. William dies in May 1888.
  6. Carl Frederickson and Hannah Jane marry in April 1890 and have three children.

Before Janie’s second marriage to Carl, he is named as a single man in the next deed. So their lives intersect.

The deed says:

DEED RECORD.

This Indenture made this 30th day of October AD 1882 between Carl Frederickson unmarried of Sumner County in the State of Kansas of the first part, and William Ryland and J. H. Dingman of Boone County, and State of Missouri of the second part:

Witnesseth, that said party of the first part, in consideration of the sum of Twelve hundred DOLLARS, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do by these presents, Grant, Bargain, Sell and Convey unto said parties of the second part, their heirs and assigns, all the following described REAL ESTATE, situated in the County of Sumner, and State of Kansas, to wit:

West half of the North East quarter (1/4) and East half of the North West quarter (1/4) of Section Thirty-four (34) Township Thirty-four (34) South of Range One (1) East of 6’ principal meridian, containing one hundred and sixty (160) acres according to U.S. Survey thereof

This grant given subject to one certain mortgage of $800 which the said party of the second part hereby assume and is considered part of the purchase money of said tract.

To Have and to Hold the Same, together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in anywise appertaining forever: And said Carl Frederickson for himself & his heirs, executors or administrators, do hereby covenant, promise and agree to and with said parties of the second part, that at the delivery of these presents he is lawfully seized in his own right, of an absolute and indefensible estate of inheritance in fee simple, of and in all and singular the above granted and described premises, with the appurtenances – that the same are free, clear, discharged and unincumbered of and from all former and other grants, titles, charges, estates, judgments, taxes, assessments, and incumbrances, of what nature or kind soever; and that he will WARRANT AND FOREVER DEFEND the same unto said parties of the second part their heirs and assigns against said party of the first part, their heirs and assigns against said party of the first part his heirs and all and every person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim the same.

In Witness Whereof, the said party of the first part has thereunto set his hand the day and year first written above written.

Carl Frederickson

State of Kansas, Sumner County, ss.

Be It Remembered, That on this 5th day of October A.D. 1882, before me the undersigned a Notary Public in and for the County and State aforesaid came Carl Frederickson single who is personally known to me to be the same persons who executed the within instrument of writing and such persons duly acknowledged the execution of the same.

In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Notarial seal, the day and year last above written.

[Notarial Seal]

D. C. Millard Notary Public

Commission expires Aug 12’ 1884

The instrument of which the foregoing is a true copy, was filed for record the 30’ day of October A. D. 1882, at 3 o’clock P.M.

T. A. Hubbard, Register of Deeds

Transcription ends.

The Big Move to Kansas

William’s wife died in May 1882. The deeds in the previous section were dated in October 1882. This short excerpt from Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma, Commemorating the Achievements of Citizens Who Have Contributed to the Progress of Oklahoma and the Development of Its Resources, (Chicago: Chapman Publishing Co., 1901, pp. 830-31) says that William and his youngest son March 3, 1883.

When Benjamin F. was a youth he moved with the family March 3, 1883, to Sumner county, Kans., and there his father died; his mother had died in Missouri.

The excerpt wrongly says “the family.” The older children had already moved. So the migrants were only William and Benjamin.

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS

This major section rounds out the post on William and Sarah (Baird) Ryland. It covers his life and his grown children’s life in Kansas. These Rylands were prosperous, entrepreneurial, and ambitious. They were true pioneers.

South Haven and Shoo Fly City

These excerpts are from Shoo Fly City, a short history about South Haven, Kansas. They are numbered and introduced for convenience, not because this was done in the book.

1. A photo of a two-story building (think of the old buildings in Jacksonville, Oregon). The caption reads:

The Ryland building, better known as the Chapman building, stood where is now South Haven Drive-In. Ryland Hall, in the second floor, was for many years the center of many social activities before the turn of the century.

2. In the section titled “School,” note that Martin Luther is well established in 1881, his name coming up as a clerk of the school board.

One of the most necessary functions when building a new town is to lay a firm foundation for the school system. The fathers of South Haven, realizing this particular obligation, lost no time at all in erecting a suitable building for that purpose.

The first school report filed by the teacher or principal of South Haven school was dated 1877 and is yet on file in the county superintendent’s office in Wellington. In searching for the date of the first high school and the subjects offered before the turn of the century, many interesting facts were uncovered.

The teachers report of 1881 made by clerk M. L. Ryland and M. H. Elliot, treasurer, stated F. M. Robert, Florence Goodwin, Morris Bruner and Lucy Tillsbury were teachers for that years, and their salaries were $50, $40, and $25. Mr. Roberts was hired for 24 weeks and the others for 16. G. K. McProud and W. J. Stultz were on the school board in 1897. A. J. Qmish was principal in 1898 . . . .

The first school building in South Haven was completed in the spring of 1873. The structure was begun many months before, however, when white lumber was hauled by ox-wagon from Emporia especially for the school building. Men of the community worked many long days to complete the house and the ladies furnished lunches for the laborers ….

In 1887 the city council called a bond election for the purpose of obtaining funds for a new school building. The bonds were voted and in 1888 a brick school building was completed. The brick used in this building was from the Ryland Bros. Brick Kiln located here in South Haven. The brick, according to Mr. Howard Barber who was a student from 1905, was of a rather lightweight and porous construction and one of the favorite pastimes of the boys during recess was to carve on the bricks. He can also remember that the school house would shake rather violently during a hard wind, but whether that was the fault of the school house or whether the winds were more violent then is not known. School was dismissed many times, however, because of high winds.

3. A photo of a two-story school building with a bell tower is shown, and the caption reads:

The second school building in South Haven, built in 1888, was constructed of brick manufactured here at the Ryland Bros. Brick Kiln.

4. Then a large section on fires that swept through South Haven in 1905 is included in the book Shoo Fly City. One passage reads:

The last of the disastrous fires was in 1905, occurring about midnight, July 30. It left a mass of burning wreckage in the center of the east side of the business block.

Defeated at the north by the old Peckham building, the fire burned all of the area south to about where the old ice house stood.

The fire started in a two-story building on the site now occupied by Alva O. Insco. The building had an outside stairway on the north side. The fire broke out in the rear of the store occupied by the McKee grocery. The Ferris building occupied the site now covered by the building north of the present post office and the former New Era office [local newspaper], which was a two-story building having a small addition to the north. The Dodson building was on the present site of the post office. W. D. Dodson, father of H. F. Dodson, rebuilt the building the following winter.

According to newspaper accounts, it was thought that the Ferris building could be saved by pulling down the Dodson building, but the effort failed, and the fire was not extinguished until it reached the Ryland building, now torn down and the Drive-In built on the site. The side of the building was badly damaged and took much effort to save, even though it was a brick structure. The origin of the fire was unknown . . . .

Soon after the 1905 fire, the city council had contracted with W. S. McGinnis for the construction of two or three large cisterns. The cisterns were to be used in case of fire and were 9×15 ft. in dimension. They were supplied by the water from the roofs of the business houses by means of tiling laid two and a half feet underground.

The cisterns were located in the alley behind the bank, behind M. L. Ryland building and the third one in the rear of the New Era office (now the Drive-In building). In an edition of the New Era, March 9, 1895 [sic], stated: “This is a good investment and our merchants will rest easier with the knowledge that there is a good supply of water at hand in case of fire, to more than repay them for the outlay. Next the ladders will be overhauled, and put in order, and a supply of buckets laid in” . . . .

5. A photo is shown of eight men, and the caption reads:

Early day business men identified in this picture are: left to right standing: U. J. Stultz, G. K. McProud, M. L. Ryland, Dr. T. J. Hollingsworth and C. L. Crookham. Seated left to right are: L. F. Baugh, J. W. Newcomb, J. P. Whitaker and C. A. Branscombe

They are all dressed in their best: suit jackets, ties (bow and long), vests, watch chains, hats; Ryland has a bowler or derby hat. Two older men have beards, and the younger ones have only moustaches. Ryland’s moustache, medium thickness, goes to the corners of his mouth.

6. Chapter 9 of Shoo Fly City is titled “City Officials.” A list says that from 1895-1897 M. L. [Martin Luther] Ryland was the mayor of South Haven.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma

Many of William’s grown kids by his first wife Sarah eventually settled in Oklahoma. This account comes from Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma, pp. 830-31. Note that Benjamin and his father William arrived in Kansas on March 3, 1883. This fits the dates we have of his deeds (Oct. 1882) and the death of his first wife Sarah back in Missouri (May 1882). Benjamin has the distinction of being a founding father of Crescent, Oklahoma.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN RYLAND.

To Mr. Ryland belongs the distinction of having started the first mercantile establishment in Crescent City.  The business was begun in a very modest and unassuming way, the various goods and chattels comprising the stock of necessities for the early settlers being deposited under a tent until such time as himself and partner, Mr. Brown, could erect a commodious log house, in which the business was successfully conducted for a year.  Mr. Brown then disposed of his share in the enterprise to Mr. Ryland, who continued to minister to the wants of the settlers for three years.  He then sold out and located on his own claim, on the northwest quarter of section 13, township 17, range 4, seventy-five acres of which are under cultivation and forty acres represent Mr. Ryland’s gift to the prospective city of Crescent.  His own remaining share of the land is under a high state of improvement, having a good house, barns and outhouses, the whole well fenced in, and made more useful and attractive by a large windmill.  In 1900 Mr. Ryland added to his possessions by purchasing another claim on the northwest quarter of section 7, township 17, range 3.  Of this, one hundred acres are tillable, and are used principally for the cultivation of cotton, corn, and wheat.  This year (1900) Mr. Ryland had one hundred acres covered with cotton.

During the fall of 1889 Mr. Ryland induced a man to locate a saw-mill on his claim, and in it has been manufactured most of the lumber used in the construction of the houses in the town. Mr. Ryland and his family occupied a house one and one-half stories in height, and for three months after coming here Mrs. Ryland was the only women in the settlement.

Mr. Ryland was born in Randolph county, Mo., August 15, 1865, and a son of William and Sarah (Beard) Ryland, natives of Iowa [sic].  There were in the family four brothers and two sisters, and of these a brother and sister are in Oklahoma, another brother and sister in the Osage Nation, and a brother in Kansas, who is a merchant at South Haven.  William Ryland was variously interested as to occupations, having been engaged in general farming, stock-raising, and the saw-mill and grist business. When Benjamin F. was a youth he moved with the family March 3, 1883, to Sumner county, Kans., and there his father died; his mother had died in Missouri. Subsequently he became the possessor of three hundred and twenty acres of land in Sumner county, which he afterward rented, and was engaged in the mercantile business.  He was thus occupied for one year, when he sold out and located on his claim in Oklahoma, April 22, 1889.

November 6, 1884, Mr. Ryland was united by marriage with Miss Mattie A. Strange [sic], a daughter of George W. and Malissa [sic] Strange, agriculturists of Sumner county, Kans.  They became the parents of the following named children:  Emma Elsie, deceased; Albert F., and Orel C., William E., Forest Z., Harry C., and an infant son, deceased.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Oklahoma, Commemorating the Achievements of Citizens Who Have Contributed to the Progress of Oklahoma and the Development of Its Resources, Chicago: Chapman Publishing Co., 1901, pp. 830-31. Note that the sketch erroneously states that William Ryland came from Iowa. It should read Ohio.

Who is James Arthur Ryland?

He’s William’s distant cousin. He bought land on September 1, 1873, in Sumner County, Kansas, according to a deed issued under the presidency of Ulysses S. Grant. So we can assume he moved there shortly before that date. He appears in the 1875 Census, in Falls, Sumner County, Kansas, and was born in about 1847. He’s a farmer. He also appears in the 1895 Census, same locality. Finally, he’s in the 1920 Census, Caldwell, Sumner County, Kansas, 72 years old, living with his son Bird Ryland. He appears in other censuses, but these will do as examples.

It is believed, with good reason, that he wrote letters to William and coaxed him to come out to Kansas, after his wife Sarah died back in Missouri. Has anyone out there preserved the letters? Also, William’s grown kids had moved out to Kansas. James owned the “Ryland’s Ford” crossing over the Chikaskia River on the old Chisholm Trail.

James A. Ryland’s gravesite:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29639807

First wife of James A. Ryland is Hattie E. Blair, who died at 21 years young.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=15024693

Second wife of James Arthur Ryland is Louisa C. Hall, whom he married on November 18, 1878. Here’s an index of marriages in Sumner County (scroll down to Sumner County and click on the right letter):

http://www.genwed.com/state/ksgen.htm

Here’s Louisa’s gravestone, complete with a photo of her:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9032736

Who is Ryland Fox?

Ryland Fox and William Ryland Jr. owned neighboring farms in Guelph Township, Sumner County, Kansas. But why did his parents give their son the first name Ryland?

The Fox family moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio about the same time that William Sr. moved, in 1810s and 1820s. The Fox family is found everywhere in the documents of Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio. Ryland Fox was born in Missouri, while his dad came from Pennsylvania. It is entirely possible that the Foxes and Rylands knew each other back in Ohio and then in Missouri. It can therefore be speculated that the parents of Ryland Fox named their son after the Ryland family, in honor of their long-standing friendship with them.

But the reason I bring it up here is the Floyd (Frank / Slim) Rucker Ryland may have gotten his middle name from a large number of Ruckers back in Randolph County, Missouri. His father William may have had a relationship with them and honored them by naming his son after them. Likewise, William’s daughter and Slim’s sister Bessie May writes in her account of the Rylands that she was named after Rev. May, who performed the funeral for William Ryland.

Here’s Fox’s final resting place:

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=85685271

Read about William Ryland’s second marriage to Hannah Jane Vickers (our direct line)

SOURCES

Sources in addition to the two books and newspaper clipping: Della Shafer provided some helpful leads and links. John. F. Ryland sent material and links, but the next couple supplied the bulk of the material in the mid-1990s: Quinton and Fran Barker live near Washington, DC, and often visited the various records offices and libraries and made two sets of copies, one for them and one for me. Thanks!

ONLINE SOURCES

Logan County, Oklahoma birth info:

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ok/county/logan/birth/birth.htm

Oak Hill Cemetery, Kansas:

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/cem/okhillnz.html

Chautauqua County Kansas Genealogy – Marriage Records, Book – I‏

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/marr/cqmarri.html

Chautauqua County Kansas Genealogy – Marriage Records, Book – E‏

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/marr/cqmarri.html

Kansas Trails Genealogy: Chautauqua Co, Kansas

http://genealogytrails.com/kan/chautauqua/index.html

Kansas Trails Genealogy Cemeteries

http://www.ksgennet.org/ks/cq/cem/cemetery.html

Happy online hunting!

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