Is this the first all-female jury in New-World America?

I don’t know, but it looks like it’s the first one in the Quaker community, in Chester County, outside Philadelphia, in 1689.

It’s the case of Mary Tuberfield, an indentured servant, who claimed she got pregnant in a boat on the Delaware River.

Continue reading

Ten Commandments: God’s Great Compromise with humanity’s big failure

That’s a shock. Aren’t we supposed to obey the Ten Commandments?

Well … only if you don’t do something else first.

This post explains the Grace Revolution in a nutshell

Continue reading

Peter Stewart is caught red-handed, in Chester County, outside Philadelphia, 1688

Peter Stewart was a yeoman who was accused of stealing a lot of money and other valuables from John Wickham.

But Wickham was no angel, either.

This short post reveals what daily life was like at our founding—or at least the daily life of some people.

Continue reading

Religious liberty, private business, and gay rights

I’m no constitutional law professor. And that’s a good thing.

All I got is common sense, which tells me we have a clash of two constitutional amendments: the First v. the Fourteenth in the private religious business v. gay rights issue.

Which amendment will win?

Continue reading

The Records of Henry Reynolds and Prudence Clayton, Chester County, PA, 1681-1728

He was active in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in and out of courts, and incurring large debts. His last Will and Testament, however, shows him to have a lot of land.

This post shows how people lived back then, in early America.

Continue reading