John Ewing and Anna Marie Heichold

This post goes from 1762 to 1835 and ranges from Pennsylvania to Ohio.

Here are the generations like links in a chain, at a glance:

James → JOHN → Catherine m. William Ryland William Jr. → Floyd (Frank) Rucker Ryland

The reason there are not more generations between the first and our grandfather is that William Jr. married a second time late in his life, after his first wife had died.

We’re not Ewing researchers. We got this information mainly from Ewing researchers, but we also wrote for some original documents.

THE BASICS

Now for the basic facts about John and Mary Ewing:

John

John Ewing was born May 16, 1762, in Lebanon Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married Anna Marie in 1783 in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. He died June 20, 1833, in Jeromesville, Ashland County, Ohio, and was buried in Meng Cemetery, in Jeromesville.

More about him:

John traveled widely, as many old pioneers did. He owned property in various places, notably in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and Washington County, Maryland, which is adjacent to Bedford County. One or two of his tracts crossed over into Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, which adjoins Bedford County.

Spelling variations: Ewings, Ewen, Ewens, Ewin, Ewins, Evans, Hughens

Anna Marie

Anna Marie (Mary) Heichold was born July 25, 1764, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. She died November 18, 1835, in Jeromesville, Ashland County, Ohio, and was buried in Meng Cemetery, Jeromesville.

More about her:

She went by her middle name and anglicized version – Mary, per the probate, below. Her father Martin Heichold was born in 1734, in Germany, and died October 6, 1806, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Her mother Marie Ursula was born 1735, and her date of death is unknown so far.

THEIR CHILDREN:

  1. John Jr. (1786-1862)
  2. George (1789-1867)
  3. William (1790-1874)
  4. Mary (Polly) (1791-1876)
  5. Catherine (1794-1874) is our direct line

See her post here:

Catherine Ewing and William Ryland

  1. Sarah (1796-1821)
  2. Jacob (1797-1866)
  3. Elizabeth (Betsy) (1799-?)
  4. James (1802-1875)
  5. Rosa (Rose) (1805-1878)

These children lived full lives, all of them migrating to Ohio, though Elizabeth’s (Betsy’s) time and place of death is not known.

  1. John Jr.

He was born January 14, 1786 In Dauphin County, Pennsylvania; he married (1) Elizabeth C. (maiden name unknown) February 5, 1829, in Wayne County, Ohio; and (2) Catherine Long, who was born 1800 York County, Pennsylvania and died September 8, 1862. John Jr. died April 17, 1862, in Jeromesville, and was buried in Yankeetown cemetery. Elizabeth was born about 1790 and died 1824. John had six children.

More about him:

John was appointed the executor or administrator of his father’s estate. He also took charge of his mother’s estate, as well.

  1. George

He was born September 7, 1789, in Washington County, Maryland. He married Mary Fluck (pronounced and sometimes spelled as Fluke), in 1815. He died December 13, 1867, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio. Mary was born March 18, 1792, in Bloody River, Pennsylvania, and she died July 19, 1854, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, next to her husband. They had eleven children.

More about them:

They traveled out to Ohio in 1815, with his sister Catherine and her husband (our) William Ryland Sr. They appear in the 1820, 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860 Censuses as neighbors (though William is not marked in the 1830 Census). So they were close both residentially and relationally. In the 1860 Census he appears as a widower and his son William has taken over the farm, but they still reside near the Rylands.

George was appointed executor or administrator of his father’s estate. He also seems to have taken charge of his mother’s estate, as well.

George’s life is closely connected to William Ryland Sr. Go here for his link:

Catherine Ewing and William Ryland

  1. William

He was born 1790, in Washington County, Maryland. He married Catherine Correll, Bedford County, Pennsylvania (date so far unknown). He died January 10, 1874, in Jeromesville, Ashland County, and was buried Eckley Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio. She was born February 27, 1791 in Ohio, and she died June 22, 1870, in Ashland County, Ohio. They had nine children.

More about them:

William was an early pioneer to Ohio. H. S. Knapp, A History of the Pioneer and Modern Times of Ashland County (1863), says of William:

Transcription Begins:

William Ewing immigrated to Mohican Township in the fall of 1814, from Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and removed to the farm which had previously been entered for him by his father, John Ewing – which farm is situated about two miles southeast of the late Michael Heickle. His immediate neighbor was John Bryan (page 408).

Transcription Ends.

Hill also has an interesting write-up in George Hill’s History of Ashland County (1880). Hill says that salt was necessary for the early inhabitants, so they had to get it from Zanesville and bring it up by pack horse or small boats up the Muskingum River and its branches. In one place in the long passage, Hill quotes William. It’s good to hear these voices come alive – as alive as we can hope for in an age that did not include modern recording devices.

Hill writes of William Ewing:

Late in the fall of 1814, William Ewing,* then a young man, living two miles below the present site of Jeromesville, fitted out a four-horse team, taking a small load of shelled corn, and money enough to purchase a load of salt, and plow-castings, and started for Zanesville. He passed up the old Portage road to Greentown, thence to near Lewis’ block-house, on the wagon trail leading to the village of Clinton, one mile north of Mt. Vernon. The day he started it was clear and cold, and he made good progress until he reached the Clear fork. That stream was unusually full and rapid. In crossing it, he struck the opposite bank obliquely, and in attempting to ascend it the hind part of his wagon was overturned, emptying the great part of the corn, which was in sacks, into the stream. For a time he thought his wagon would be drawn into the current, and his horses entangled and drowned. Fortunately, he had a fifth-chain along, which he fastened to the coupling poll, and, hitching two horses to it, and at the same time encouraging his wheel horses, he succeeded in righting the hind wheels and dragging the wagon up the bank to dry land. The next effort was to fish out the sacks of corn and food, which had become completely saturated with water. After considerable exertion, he finally replaced his corn in the wagon, when, to use his own language, “the only dry spot on him was the collar on the back of his neck.” Being much chilled and benumbed, it was with difficulty he could hitch his horses in their proper places in the team. This he finally succeeded in doing; and again started on the patch through the forest. He continued along it until after dark, expecting to lay out during the night, and probably freeze before morning; but, as he was about to lose all hope, the light of a cabin window was seen in the distance. Pressing on, he soon reached it, wet, cold and hungry. He was welcomed to its shelter. His horses being arranged about the feeding trough, and fed, he found his new landlady had prepared him a bowl of warm mush and milk, for which he was exceedingly thankful. The fire kept up a cheerful blaze until he had dried his clothing and recovered from his numbness. He slept soundly, rose bright and early, and started on his way whistling. In about ten days he returned safely to his cabin, with a load of salt and castings. We give this incident to illustrate the hardships endured by the pioneers.

*Mr. Ewing died in Montgomery township in 1874, aged about eighty years.

Transcription Ends.

  1. Mary (Polly)

She was born September 3, 1791, in Conocheague, Washington County, Maryland. She married Jacob Stoler in Bedford County (date unknown so far). She died June 22, 1876, in Jeromesville, Ashland County, Ohio, and was buried in Jeromesville Cemetery. Jacob was born October 5, 1776, in Pennsylvania, and died April 10, 1867. They had no children.

More about them:

Mary’s father John appointed Jacob Stoler to be his attorney, on October 7, 1814, back in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, unless the “attorney” is Jacob Sr. (see below).

  1. Catherine

For more information on her, see the William Ryland Sr. post, here:

Catherine Ewing and William Ryland

  1. Sarah

She was born 1796 in Washington County, Maryland. She married Thomas Brown September 30, 1821, in Wayne County, Ohio. She died March 12, 1885, in Wayne County, Ohio, and was buried in Congress Cemetery. He was born 1790 in Virginia, and died November 10, 1846. They had seven children.

More about them:

Thomas appears in John’s will, but he does not receive much. Family tradition says he was not well liked (see the will, below).

  1. Jacob

He was born November 17, 1797, in Washington County, Maryland. He married Sophia Mowrey, April 19, 1821 (place unknown so far). He died May 18, 1866, in McComb, ____ County, Ohio, and was buried in Liberty Indian Green Cemetery. She was born December 8, 1800, in Pennsylvania, and died June 21, 1884. They had eight children.

More about him:

He appears in his father’s will, but does not receive much. See the will below.

  1. Elizabeth (Betsey)

She was born 1799, in Washington County, Maryland. Her date and place of death are unknown so far. “No record found of her husband” – Eleanor (Ewing) Swineford, a through researcher on the Ewings.

  1. James

He was born December 7, 1802, in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. He married Anna Marie Long on February 13, 1823, in Wayne County, Ohio (Recall that John Jr. married Catherine Long). He died August 6, 1875, in Hancock County, Ohio, and was buried in McCombs Cemetery. She was born December 8, 1801, in York County, Pennsylvania, and died May 1, 1886. They had eleven children.

More about him:

He was not appointed an executor of his father’s estate, and he took the initiative to pay some bills, like the fee for the coffin and gravestone.

  1. Rosa

She was born March 5, 1805, in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She married George Swineford, in 1820 (place unknown so far). She died April 15, 1878, in Ashland County, Ohio, and was buried in Ashland City cemetery. George was born in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died March 17, 1867. They had twelve children.

JOHN AND MARY’S LAND RECORDS

John was a prosperous farmer, and sometime miller – he owned and operated a mill, as many early Americans did. He owned land in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and eventually in Ohio. Relevant to our lineage, he has land in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, along the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River, where John Ryland owns land. John Ewing’s daughter Catherine and John Ryland’s son William marry, about spring 1814. John Ewing sells land to his new son-in-law and son George in June 1814, out in Ohio, where they will move in fall 1815.

To read these deeds with more precision, a perch is measured thus:

1 Perch = 1 rod = 5.50 yards = 16.5 feet = 5.029 meters

April 24, 1802

Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania (John Ewing) and ___ ? Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania (Abraham and Elizabeth Shoup). This deed is summarized, her, not transcribed. John Ewing buys two tracts, totaling 139 acres 150 perches, for £1025.00 (Pounds). The land had been owned by Sebastian Shoup, father of Abraham, now deceased, and he had given it to his sons Abraham and Henry, the latter of whom quit claim on it, by September 23, 1801. So now Abraham is free to sell it. Deed was sealed and delivered in the presence of Amos Evans, David Wishart, and Frederick Stoler. Abraham and Elizabeth signed it. John Ewing paid the amount on the date of the deed. (Book F, page 371)

April 3, 1803

Hopewell Township, on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River, Bedford County and Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. John Ewing mortgages two tracts of land (fifty-two acres and fifty-three perches and eighty-seven acres and ninety-seven perches), sold to him by Abraham and Margaret Shoup, to be paid in yearly installments. The margins say that John Ewing paid his debt by April 6, 1818. (Book F, pages 295-97)

The Indenture reads:

This Indenture made the eight day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand hundred and three Between John Ewings of the Township of Hopewell and County of Bedford in the State of Pennsylvania, Yeoman, and Mary his Wife of the one part, and Abraham Shoup of the Township County and State aforesaid, Yeoman, of the other part.

Witnesseth that whereas the said John Ewings in and by certain obligations or writings obligatory under his hand and seal bearing date herewith ___ herewith standeth bound unto the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup in the sum of thirteen hundred and fifty Pounds, lawful money of Pennsylvania conditioned for the payment of six hundred and twenty-five Pounds lawful money aforesaid, for one hundred Pounds on the first day of April Anno Domini 1804, and one hundred Pounds on the first day of April Anno Domini 1805, And one hundred pounds on the first day of April A. D. 1806, and one hundred pounds on the first Day of April A. D. 1807, and one hundred Pounds on the first day of April A. D. 1808, and one hundred pounds on the first day of April A. D. 1809, and seventy-five pounds on the first day of April A. D. 1810. As in and by the said recited obligations and conditions thereof relation being thereunto had more fully and at large appears.

Now this Indenture Witnesseth that the said John Ewings and Mary his wife as well for and in consideration of the aforesaid debt or sum of six hundred and seventy-five Pounds, for the better securing the payment thereof unto the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup, their Executors, Administrators and assigns in discharge of the said recited obligation, as of the further sum of five shillings to him in hand paid by ____ Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup at and before the ____ and delivery hereof the receipt whereof Whereby acknowledged have granted bargained sold released and confirmed and by these presents do grant bargain release and confirm unto the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup their heirs and assigns Five certain tracts of Land with the Improvements thereon erected, situate lying and being in the Township of Hopewell and partly in the County of Bedford and partly in the County of Huntingdon and State of Pennsylvania aforesaid and on the South side of the Raystown branch of Juniata and now actually in the possession of the said John Ewings the one tract or piece of Land

Beginning at a post by an ____ at the bank of the Raystown Branch of Juniata, thence down the said branch North fifteen degrees, East fifty-four perches to a Poplar, thence North seventy-seven degrees, East sixty Perches to a white Oak, South forty [fifty] two and a half degrees, East seventy three perches to a Black Oak, down South two degrees sixty-four perches to a Stone heap, North sixty-seven degrees West, one hundred and thirty-three perches to a post and place of Beginning, Containing fifty-two acres and fifty-three perches.

The other Tract or piece of Land Beginning at the white oak thence by the first mentioned Tract of Land, North one degree West sixty Perches to a Red Oak, North forty-three degrees West seventy-seven perches to a white Oak, thence by surveyed Lands North six degrees East fifty-two perches to a Pine; thence [by] Sebastian Shoups Mill run South seventy eight degrees East one hundred and thirty perches to a hickory south sixty degrees East fifty four [?] perches to a Dogwood thence by a hill South ten degrees East thirty-four perches to ____ oak South seventy-nine degrees West eighty perches to a Chestnut and South thirty-nine Degrees West eighty-four perches to the place of Beginning, containing eighty-seven acres and ninety-seven perches and allowance of six percent for Roads &c – Together with all and singular the buildings improvements ways woods waters water courses rights liberties privileges hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging or in any wise appertaining and the reversions [?] and Remainders Rents Issues and Profits thereof.

To have and to hold the said two tracts of or pieces of Land hereditaments and premises hereby granted or mentioned or intended so to be with the appurtenances unto the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup their heirs and assigns forever, to the only proper use and behoof of the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup their heirs and assigns forever. Provided always nevertheless that if said John Ewings his heirs and executors administrators shall and do well and truly pay or cause to be paid to the said Abraham Shoup and Margaret Shoup their executors, administrators or assigns the said Debt or sum of six hundred and seventy-five pounds on the days and times herein before mentioned and appointed for payment thereof with lawful Interest after they becomes [sic] due according to the Conditions of the said recited obligation without any fraud or further delay [?] and without any deduction or ______ or abatement to be made of anything by or in respect of any taxes, charges or assessments whatsoever then and from thenceforth as well this present Indenture and the Estate hereby granted as the said recited obligations shall cease determine and become absolutely null and void to all intents and purposes anything herein before contained to the contrary in any wise notwithstanding.

In Witness whereof the said John Ewings and Mary his wife have hereunto interchangeably set our hands and seals the day & year first before written,

Sealed and delivered in the presence of us Amos Evans, Miles Evans, David Wishart [?]

John Ewens (In German) Seal

Bedford County ss.

On the Twelfth Day of April in the Year of Anno Domini 1803, Personally came and appeared before me Amos one of the Justices of the peace in and for the County aforesaid John Ewings and his Wife and acknowledged the a foregoing Indenture to be their act and deed and devised the same to be recorded as such, Witness my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid

Amos Evans

I assign all my Title Right Claim Interest and Demand of the Mortgage to David Wishart for value received as witness my hand and seal the twelfth day of April one thousand eight hundred and three years.

Witnesses Present:

Joseph [Higton]

Jacob Stotter

Recorded July 7th 1803

Jacob Bonnett, Recorder

[In the Margins]: Rec’d on the day of the date of the a foregoing Indenture the sum of five shillings within mentioned witness Present ______ us

John Ewens

Amos Evans

I Abraham Shoup one [of] the parties in within deed of Mortgage mentioned do acknowledge to have received from John Ewings grantor therein named, the sum of six hundred & seventy-five pounds in full satisfaction for the debt due on this mortgage – Witness my hand & seal this 6th day of April A. D. 1818

Abraham Shoup (seal)

Test:

David Mann _____?

Transcription Ends.

April 8, 1803

Hopewell Township. Partly in Bedford County and partly in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. John Ewing pays five shillings to Margaret Shoup, widow of Sebastian Shoup, so she can release the title of a dower tied to the farm. (Book F, p. 342)

The indenture reads:

Know all men by these presents that Margaret Shoup Widow and relict of Sebastian Shoup late of Hopewell Township deceased for divers good causes and considerations and especially for & in consideration of the sum of five shillings to me in hand paid by John Ewings at & before the ensealing & delivery have of the receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge have remised released and forever quit claimed and by these presents do remise release and forever quit claim unto the said John Ewings & to his heirs & assigns all & all manner of dower and right and title of dower and other interest right or title whatsoever which I the said Margaret Shoup now have, may, might, should or of right ought to have or claim of into or out of all that Messuage or Messuages hereditaments & premises which my son Abraham Shoup and Elizabeth his Wife did convey by their deed bearing date the twenty-fourth day of April A. D. 1802 to John Ewings and every part and parcel thereof with the appurtenances; and also all manner of action and actions, writ and writs of dower or other actions and rights to make ____ whatsoever. So that neither I the said Margaret Shoup nor any other Person of Persons whatsoever for me, or in my name right or stead, any manner of dower or writ of dowers or actions right or title of the said Messuages plantation or plantations hereditaments premises above named (laying and being partly in Bedford and partly in Huntingdon Counties) be of or in any part or parcel thereof at any time hereafter shall or may have claim or prosecute against the said John Ewings his heirs or assigns.

In Witness whereof I the said Margaret Shoup have hereunto set my hand and seal the eighth day of April in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and three 1803.

Sealed & delivered in the presence of

Amos Evans Miles Evans

Margaret (X) Shoup [her mark is a capital, printed M – very deliberate and dignified]

Received on the day of the date within and above written Indenture John Ewings the sum of five shillings the full consideration within mentioned I say rec’d and p’d me

Margaret (X) Shoup

Bedford County, ss

The twelfth day of April A. D. 1803 personally came & appeared before me Amos Evans one of the Justices of the peace in & for said County Margaret Shoup and acknowledged the above and within written Indenture to be her act and deed and devised the same to be recorded as such. Witness my hand and seal the day and year above written.

Recorded 1st day of October 1803.

Jacob Bonnett Rec’r [Recorder]

Transcription Ends.

September 26, 1814

Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania. The deed is summarized here, not transcribed. John Ewing (miller) and Mary his wife sell to Abraham Roads (yeoman) two tracts of land totaling 139 acres and 150 perches, for £1475.00 (Pounds). The two tracts are situated “partly in Bedford County and partly Huntingdon County.” In fact, it’s the same two tracts that John Ewing had bought on April 24, 1802 for £1025.00 (Pounds). So he made a profit on the sale, twelve years later (see a summary of the 1802 deed, above). This 1814 deed was signed and delivered in the presence of John Piper and Rachael Piper. John Ewing and Mary Ewing signed their names. On September 26, 1814, John and Mary acknowledged this to be their act and deed, and Mary consented to the sale voluntarily, without compulsion (standard procedure for wives). (Book IJ or IT pages 490-492, but not transcribed)

April 14, 1818

Wayne County, Ohio, and Huntingdon and Bedford Counties, Pennsylvania. This deed is not transcribed here, but summarized. (Book P, pages 481-83)

John Ewing of Wayne County sells 117 acres and 85 perches in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, to Peter Swope (?) of Huntingdon County and John King of Bedford County for $1,800.

It was previously owned by Edmund Milne, bearing patent February 7, 1797. Then he sold the land to John (last name illegible) on May 1, 1801. He sold it to John Ewing, no date stated. John Ewing finally sells it to Peter Swope and John King, who paid him in full on the day of the sale.

John Ewing signs his name the German way Johannes Ewenns (?), with an umlaut. Honestly, it looks like Jesanuns Jenus, but some signatures are hard to decipher. Witnesses: Samuel Riddles and J. G. Chapman. Christopher Reiley, Justice of the Peace, witnessed John Ewing make this act and deed. Recorded by Job. Manns on June 17, 1829.

July 20, 1829

Richland County and Jefferson County, Ohio. John Ewing of Jefferson County sells 160 acres located in Richland County to Allen Kelly for $300.00. (Vol. 13, p. 81)

Northeast quarter of Section 32 in Township 18 of Range 20, in Richland County, in the district of Wooster, in the territory northwest of the Ohio, and above the mouth of the Kentucky River

Signed by John Ewing in the presence of Jacob Vantz and Andrew Cable.

July 1, 1831

Wayne County, Ohio. Certificate No. 1705. These certificates functioned as receipts for land purchased several years before. William Boyles sold land to John Ewing (Vol. 13, p. 81), specifically:

The west half of the southeast quarter of Section 11 of Township 21, in Range 15, in the district of land subject to sale at Wooster, Ohio, containing 80 acres.

Signed by Andrew Jackson (actually his representative signed it)

September 2, 1834

Washington D C and Jefferson County, Ohio. James Madison grants a patent of 160 acres to John Ewing of Jefferson County (Vol. 13, p. 80).

Northeast quarter of Section 32 in Township 18 of Range 20, in the district of Wooster.

Signed by James Madison (actually signed by the commissioner George Graham)

JOHN EWING GRANTS POWER OF ATTORNEY

October 7, 1814

Bedford County, Pennsylvania. John Ewing grants the power of attorney to Jacob Stoler, who is possibly his son-in-law, married to his daughter Mary (Polly). However, since the power was granted back in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and in 1814, Jacob could be Senior, the father of Jacob Junior. More research needs to be done.  Book IJ or IT page 530.

Transcription Begins:

Ewing to Stoler

Know all men by these presents, that I, John Ewing, of Bedford County and State of Pennsylvania, yeoman, have made, constituted, and appointed and by these presents do make, constitute, and appoint and in my place put and depute my trusty friend Jacob Stoler of the said County and Commonwealth, my true and lawful attorney for me and in my name to ask, demand, sue for, recover and receive all such sum and sums of money, debts, goods, wares, merchandizes, dues and accounts, and other demands of whatever nature, which are or shall be due, owing, payable and belonging to me, or detained from me by any manner of ways or means whatsoever, or in whose hands soever the same may be found, giving and granting to my said attorney by these presents full and ample power and authority in and about the premises, to have, use, and take all lawful ways and means in my name for the purpose aforesaid, and upon the receipt of any such debts, dues, sums of money, goods, wares or merchandizes, requitances [sic], or other sufficient discharges for me and in my name, to make, sign, seal and deliver; and further to appear before any Court, Judge, Justice or other officer and for me and in my name to acknowledge all and every such act, matter, and thing, as may be necessary for carrying into full effect the power hereby granted.

 And also for me and in my name to lease and demise all my lands in Bedford County aforesaid, upon such terms and conditions as my said attorney may think proper – giving and granting to my said attorney by these presents – to have and use all lawful ways and means in my name for the purposes aforesaid, and further for me and in my name and stead, to appear before any Judge, Justice or other officer and as and for my act and deed to acknowledge every such act matter and thing as may be necessary for carrying into full and complete effect the power hereby granted.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this seventh day of October A.D one thousand eight hundred and fourteen.

[Signed:] John Ewing

Test. James Riddle

Bedford County, ss

Be it remembered that on the day of the date of the foregoing letters of attorney personally appeared before the subscriber one of the Justices of the Peace in and for the County aforesaid, the above named John Ewing and acknowledged the same to be his act and deed for the purposes therein mentioned.

Witness my hand [“and seal” illegible] the aforesaid day and year.

Thomas Hunt

Recorded [day illegible] January A.D. 1815

David M___, Recorder

Transcription Ends.

JOHN EWING AS APPRAISER

The next link shows that John Ewing was part of a group of men who determined that one of Lewis Fluck’s tract could not be divided without spoiling the whole. Lewis was Elizabeth’s father, and Elizabeth married Henry Ryland, the youngest son of Paul. Paul is our direct line and original immigrant to America. These families are interconnected.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~treasures/pa/bedford/orphanscourt/bedfordcoorphanscourt5.htm (scroll down to Lewis Fluck, or do a Ctrl-F word search on Ewing)

JOHN AND MARY’S PROBATE

 November 12, 1832

Mohican Township, Wayne County, Ohio. John Ewing draws up his will and names his wife Mary and offspring John, George, William, Jacob, James, Polly (Mary), Catherine (our direct line), Betsey, Sarah, and Rose. His will and other probate records are found in Wayne County Probate Court, No. E-3, under John Evans, though it should be Ewing.

Recall that John died June 20, 1833, and his wife Mary died November 18, 1835.

The will reads:

I John Ewens of Mohican Township Wayne County and State of Ohio, being weak in body, but of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding do make and publish this my last will and Testament in manner and form following, that is to say –

FIRST, it is my will that my funeral expences [sic] and all my just debts be fully paid.

SECOND, I give and devise and bequeath to my beloved wife Mary Ewens all the property of every description by me owned consisting of household furniture & other property together with the interest arising from all the monies due and owing to me during her natural life. She however disposing of a sufficiency thereof: to pay all my just debts as aforesaid. And at the death of my said wife all the property hereby devised or bequeathed to her as aforesaid or so much thereof as may then remain unexpended to my five sons John Ewens, George Ewens, William Ewens, Jacob Ewens, and to my five daughters Polly, Catherine, Betsey, Sarah, & Rose, and to their heirs and assigns forever. –

THIRD, I give and bequeath to each of my sons and daughters aforesaid an equal share of all that may be left after the deceases of my wife as aforesaid (Except Jacob Ewens to whom I give and bequeath one dollar only and to Thomas Brown, I give and bequeath one dollar and no more. And to Sarah Brown my daughter I give and bequeath equal share with the rest of my sons and Daughters (Jacob Ewens Excepted) which share is to remain in the hands of my executors & whoever they may appoint, as their successors to keep, the same and to be by them given to the said Sarah Brown, as they may see proper or thinks [sic] she personally needs, any part thereof, for her personal [“need” written over] necessities & in case the said Sarah should not live until she [careted in: has] received all her share or legacy then the remainder to be divided equally among her children and paid to them at such an age as my executors may think most proper. –

And lastly, I hereby constitue [sic] and appoint my sons George Ewens & John Ewens to be Executors of this my last will and testament, revoking and annulling all former Wills by me made, and ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twelfth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred thirty two.

Johann Ewens (seal)

Signed, published and declared by the above name John Ewens, as and for his last will and testament, in presence of us, who at his request have signed as witnesses to the same.

Henry Dubbs

Samuel E. Warner

Transcription Ends.

Regarding the paltry amount given to Jacob Ewing and Thomas Brown, Eleanor (Ewing) Swineford writes to me:

From family stories passed down, Jacob owed his father money and Thomas, [husband] of Sarah was not very well liked by the family. His information has been hard to find and his family background has not been located, only to have been born in Virginia (just a little family story and reading between the lines, so to speak).

No date

Wayne County, Ohio. Though there is no date, the Inventory and Appraisement was taken usually a month or two after the decease (recall that John died June 20, 1833). Thomas Seely, Jacob Stinsil (though the final account table, below, reads Steel), and John Glenn went out to John Ewing’s farm and appraised the value of his property, mostly personal in his case. They got paid for their services.

Much larger Inventory Appraisements can be found on this website. Clearly, the appraisers just focused on the goods that John Ewing owned inside his house, not the crops and farming equipment, for example.

The yards of cloth may indicate that John and Mary had a small business of making and selling clothes and other finished products. Or, simply, they used the cloth for themselves, their friends, children, and grandchildren. More research is needed.

 

A true and accurate inventory of the goods of John Ewins of Wayne C’y Ohio, dec’d
One stove and pipe [piper?] $16 00
One bureau 08
One table falen [sic] leaf 02 0?
One old Saddle 11
One chest 01
One bed sta’ [?] bed & bedding 12
One bed sta’ [?] without S_____ bedding & bed 13[?]
Three _____ of Chares [sic, read: chairs] 02 25
One pair of hand Irons 00 50
One l—[?] coloured [sic] fur hat 01 25
One pair of blue Cloth pantaloons 01
One blue Cloth Caut__[?] 00 50
One pair blue Cotton pantaloons 01
One black burnhazel [?] vest [?] 01 00
One Shutle [?] vest 01 00
One Great Coat 03 50
One [Drab?] vest 75
One black Cloth vest 75
One pair [Drab?] Cloth pantaloons 50
Seven shirts Each 1 00
8 yards light Drab [?] Cloth at one dollar per yard 8 00
3 yards dark [Drab?] Cloth 1 75
One note George Swineford ?
James Ewens 100
Wm Ewens 55
Geo Ewens 65 68
Henry Hefner 12 28
One pale red cow 12

[signed:]

Thomas Seely}

Jacob Stinsl [?]} Appraisers

John Glenn}

Transcription ends.

1833-1838

Wayne and Ashland Counties, Ohio. Here are the receipts and payments of the final account. Significantly, the one dated January 24, 1836, says Mary needed attendance and medicine, indicating she was sick and needed care. The final accounts table, below, says Dr. Jacob Kuhn attended her, but we should not doubt that one of her kids also looked in on her or even lived with her. Hints like this are valuable to us today because they form a picture of what daily life was like.

Recall that John died June 20, 1833, and his wife Mary died November 18, 1835. These receipts have been placed in chronological order, not the order in which they were copied by Wayne County Probate Court.

Transcription begins:

 

July 8th 1833 Rec’d of George Ewing & John Ewing Admin’s of the Estate of John Ewing de’d the Sum of Six dollars in full for making a coffin A Connor

 

 

Rec’d October 7, 1833 of John Ewing [the rest illegible due to light ink]

 

Receiv’d of John & George Ewins executors of John Ewins Estate for our servis [sic] as apraisers [sic] the Sum of one dollar each

December 23rd 1833

[Signed:]

John Glenn

Thomas Seely

Jacob Steel [?]

 

Received (Jeromesville) Nov 20th 1833 of John Ewins & George Ewins Administrators of John Ewins Senior Dec’d (by the hand of James Ewins) Five Dollars & sixty seven cents in full of apc due W Comb Ingmond [sic] & Co.

J W Comb for the Firm of W Comb Ingmond & Co.

 

 

January 18th 1834

Received of James Ewins one dollars and twentey [sic] five cts as a witness fee witch [sic] was comming [sic] to me from John and George Ewins executors of John Ewins deceist [sic]

 

Rec’d Oct 8th 1834 of George & John Ewins Administrators of the Estate of John Ewins Dec’d [deceased] two dollars & nineteen cents bal of Book a pct

J W Comb

 

Re’ved of John & George Hughens [sic, read: Ewing] Exe’tors two doll & fifty cts of the Estate of the widow Hughens [sic] deceased

Jeny [sic] 24th 1836 Jacob Kuhns [physician]

For attendance & medicine for the Decast [sic, read: deceased]

 

Ashland, August 22, 1836

Received of George Ewing Executor of the Estate of John Ewing deceased four [?] dollars for one Lott of Grave Stone for Mary Ewing wife of said deceased

L H Larkin

 

Jeromeville Oct 9th 1836

Rec’d of John & George Ewings Administrators on the estate of John Ewins Se’r deceased six dollars & fifty cents

Aquila Connor

 

Paid of [to?] James Ewing one dollar and two cents on account of John [Ewings?] Nov [?, ?] [signed ?] [illegible due to light ink and copying]

 

Rec’d Jeromesville 14th November 1836 of James Ewins for George and John Ewins Administrators of the Estate of John Ewins Dec’d Four Dollars & forty seven Cents an a pct in full

J W Comb

 

Received of George Ewings Exutor of the Estate of John Ewings Dec’d two dollars & eleven cents Book accpt of [?]g amt John Ewings Deceased for value December the 15th 1836 A Newman S R

 

Received of George Ewing Administrator of the estate of John Ewing deceased eighteen cents for recording inventory of the goods and chattels of said estate

Oct 30th 1838

David Sloane for John Donne late clk [clerk] of the C.C.P. [Court of Common Pleas]

Transcription ends.

1833-1836

This table is the final account, debits on one side, credits on the other. Often they match up with the receipts, above. Recall that John died June 20, 1833, and his wife Mary died November 18, 1835.

 

George Ewin and John Ewin Executors of the [Es]state of John Ewin, deceased, in account with Said estate
Dr Cr
1833 December 23rd To Amount of personal property taken at appraisement $ Cts 1833 July 8th Paid A. Connor by the hand of James Ewin for making coffin No. 1 $

6

Cts

00

1838 Febry 28th Cash received of James Ewin on his note 108 25 Oct 1?th Paid Edward Avery attorneys fees No. 2 3 00
1837 January 5th Cash received of William Ewin on his note 108 00 Dec 23rd Paid John Glenn appraisers fees “3 1 00
1836 Sept 24th Cash received of George Swineford on his note 240 00 Ditto Paid Thomas Seely “ “ “ “4 1 00
1836 Novm 11th Cash received of Henry Heffner 12 28 Paid Jacob Steel “ “ “ “ “5 1 00
1837 January 5th Cash received of George Ewin on his note 63 68 Paid E Wilson justice of the peace “6 1 00
1836 Sept 24th Interest received from the above notes 9 20 1834

Jan 8th or 18th

Paid Henry Dubbs, for attending Court as a witness “7 1 25
Total Amount 597 41 Oct 8th Paid Joseph W Combs on acc’t “8 2 19
1835

Nov 20th

Paid W Combs and Jagmans [Ingmonds?] by the hand of James Ewin on acc’t “9 5 67
? 19th Paid Robert W Mahan? By the hand of James Ewin on acc’t “10 1 2?
1836 Csh? After death of the widow
 Janry 24th Paid Jacob Kuhns his acc’t for attendance on dec’d as physician “11 2 50
Oct 9th Paid A. Connor for coffin “12 6 50
Aug 22nd Paid S H Larkin for one Sett of grave stones “13 9 00
Novm 14th Paid J W Combs on acc’t “14 4 41?
Dec 5th Paid A Newman on acc’t “15 2 11
47 71 ½
Balance in Executors hands 549 69 ½
Fees for Exect’r 35 84
Ballans ? in Hands of Exter at this time is five hundred and thirteen Dollars 85 Cents at this time 513 85 ½
Paid my fees for Recording Settlement account 1 50

 

Signed S L. Lorah, clk [clerk]

[Calculation at bottom:]

597.41

– 47.89

______

549.52

Please click on the post about his daughter Catherine Ewing:

Catherine Ewing and William Ryland

 

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