William Ryland, Sr. and Catherine Ewing

This post goes from 1788 to 1876, when William Ryland’s probate finished.

Here are the Ryland generational links at a glance:

PaulJohn → WILLIAM SR. → William Jr. m. (1) Sarah Baird and (2) Hannah Jane VickersFloyd (Frank) Rucker Ryland

The reason there are few links is that John started his family late and William Jr. married a second time in his mature age, after his first wife died.

THE BASICS

William Ryland

He was born August 15, 1788 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania; another researcher says he was born on September 4, 1789. The tax records in Huntingdon County say he reached his twenty-first birthday in 1811, so his birth year was 1790 (though the age of majority was fluid back then. He died April 19, 1867 in Mohican Township, Ashland County, Ohio and is buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery. His gravestone reads: 78 years, 8 months, 4 days, near his wife in Old Section, Part 2, and Row 10. He married Catherine Ewing, who was born September 1, 1794 in Washington County, Maryland (or Bedford County, Pennsylvania). She died October 1, 1874, in Mohican Township, Ashland County, Ohio. She was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio. Her gravestone reads: 80 years, 1 month, ? days (broken).

It is best to conclude he was born on August 15, 1788.

Here is a photo of the cemetery entrance:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GRid=23774873&CRid=43905&

Here is his grave marker:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774873

More about him

Family tradition says he went by the nickname Billy.

His father John bought land in Bedford County, in December 1789. If William was born in 1788, then his county of birth was probably Berks, where his father originated. One researcher says his date of birth was July 4, 1789, which makes his county of birth the same one. Still another online researcher says 1791. The tax records in Huntingdon County say he was taxable in 1811, denoting a birth year of 1790, since a man became taxable at 21 years old. However, he could have lived in Bedford County before moving to Huntingdon County with his father and appearing on the tax list for the first time in 1811. But if he was born in 1791, then his county of birth was Bedford.

It’s best to conclude he was born in 1788, per his gravestone.

Spelling variation: Reyland, Riland

Catherine Ewing

She was born September 1, 1794 in Washington County, Maryland or in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. The two counties adjoin and in fact have border disputes. She died October 1, 1874, in Mohican Township, Ashland County, Ohio; she was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, near her husband William in Old Section, Part 2, Row 10.

More about her

Many Ewings moved to Richland (then Ashland County) and other counties in Ohio, in the 1810s and 1820s. Catherine gave birth to eleven children. In the 1870 Census, she lives in the town of Hayesville with her grandson Stephen K. Black, son of her firstborn Mary Ann. By then, Catherine is a great-grandmother, for Stephen had a seven-month-old girl named Lunette. Catherine’s husband William had passed on, in 1867.

Catherine’s gravestone reads: 80 years, 11 months, ? days (broken).

However, her record of death (no. 238 in a list recorded in 1875) says she was 80 years, 11 months, and 21 days old. The record says she died in Vermillion, America [sic]; cause of death not stated (other persons listed above and below her had such things as congested lungs, lung fever, lung paralysis, scarlet fever, accident, jaundice, consumption, scarlet rash, diarrhea, croup, premature birth, killed by cars [train cars?], still born, pneumonia, brain diseased, old age, cholera infection, and so on). Whatever the cause of her death, she must have died in her grandson Stephen’s home, in Hayesville. It seems they were close, so her passing surely caused a lot of distress and grief, not only in her immediate household, but in the entire family.

Here is her gravestone at the same cemetery:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774872

RYLANDS AND THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

William’s grandfather Paul and father John are patriots. Their contribution to the war effort has been recognized by DAR.

Paul’s patriot / ancestor number: A206879

John’s patriot / ancestor number: A206184

Go here and type in those numbers:

http://services.dar.org/public/dar_research/search/?Tab_ID=1

DAR approved the father-and-son connection between John and William, so all of the Rylands who descend from the early Rylands in these posts can join. The Rylands were wise to leave behind such clear and copious probate.

Further, Paul’s son James has also been approved.

His patriot / ancestor number: A204965

Their names had been lost in time. We brought them into the public view, in the spotlight, so we could remember their contributions to the freedom and country we enjoy today. We gladly salute our veterans and their supporters, no matter how far back they go in history or how recently they lived.

BEDFORD AND HUNTINGDON COUNTIES, PENNSYLVANIA

William and Catherine began life in Pennsylvania, though a census record says she lived across the border in Maryland. Her father owned land seemingly everywhere, so she may have lived in various places, growing up.

We’ve already looked at William Ryland’s parentage in the John Ryland post. So let’s briefly review Catherine’s heritage, though her parents and lineage would require another book.

Catherine’s Heritage

Catherine’s immediate heritage can be simplified. Her father John Ewing was born May 16, 1762, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married Anna Maria (Mary) Heichold about 1783. She was born July 25, 1764 and died November 18, 1835. Anna Maria was born daughter of Martin Heichold, per his will of October 6, 1801 in Heidelberg Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. John died June 20, 1833, age 71 years 1 mo and 4 days. John and Mary are buried in the Meng Cemetery, Perry Township, Ashland County, Ohio.

John wrote his will on November 12, 1832, in Wayne County, Ohio. He and Anna Maria (Mary) had ten children: George (moved to Ohio with our William and Catherine Ryland), Mary (Polly), William, Catherine (our direct line), Sarah, Jacob, Betsy, James, and Rosa.

John Ewing’s father was James Ewing (1720/5-1776) of Lebanon Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, who married the widow Mary Shelleberger. She bore him two sons: James and John (our direct line).

John was very mobile, as many Americans were back then. He is in the 1790 and 1800 Censuses of Washington County, Maryland. He also owned property in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and the farm was close by John Ryland’s land. So William Ryland and Catherine Ewing most likely met in Bedford County, unless William traveled down to Washington County, which is the least likely scenario.

William and Catherine’s Opportunity to Meet

William and Catherine had the opportunity to meet and marry because of their deep roots in Hopewell Township, along the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River, Bedford County.

The following summaries of the deeds show their parents’ roots in the same vicinity.

December 23, 1789

Hopewell Township. Bedford County, Pennsylvania. William’s father John Ryland received a warrant of five acres on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River.

Situate on the South East Side of the Raystown branch of the Juniata – in Hopewell Township Bedford County Containing Seven Acres and eighty-three perches and allowance of six pc [percent]. Resurveyed the 21st day of March 1827 on a warrant granted to John Ryland the 23 day of December 1789 for 5 ac. Survey recorded in book D16, p. 267. Warrant may be recorded in Vol. P, but no reference is given in the abstract.

April 11, 1793

Hopewell Township. Bedford County, Pennsylvania. John Ryland received a warrant of 75 acres on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River.

Situate on the South East Side of the Raystown Branch of Juniata – in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, containing one hundred and nine acres 147 p. and alle. Of six pr. ct. Survey’d for John Ryland the 28 day of May 1793 and resurvey’d the 21st day of March 1827 on a Warrant dated the 11th day of Apriel [sic] 1793 for 75 acres. Recorded in vol. H, no. 46, p. 194; Survey recorded in book C211 p. 169.

September 28, 1799

Hopewell Township. Bedford County, Pennsylvania. John Ryland buys eighty acres from Joseph Shoup, for £130.00 on the Raystown branch of the Juniata River.

April 4, 1802

Hopewell Township. Bedford County, Pennsylvania, Catherine’s father John Ewing buys property on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River.

Abraham Shoup of Union twp. Huntington Co., PA, miller, and Elizabeth his wife, to John Ewings of the township of Hopewell Bedford Co., PA, yeoman, for £1,025 two tracts of land being partly in Huntington County, PA and partly in Hopewell Township Bedford Co., Pa. One containing 52 acres 53 perches located on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River. The other next to it by Sebastian Shoup’s Mill run etc. containing 87 acres 97 perches (it being of the land that was given and devised to Henry Shoup and Barbara his wife by the last will and testament of Sebastian Shoup late of Hopewell Township and since a quit claim by Henry & Barbara to Abraham Shoup and Elizabeth bearing date 23 September 1801, etc. Recorded in Deed Book F, page 371

Online source for John Ewing’s land record: http://www.clanewing.org/books/EwingInEarlyAmerica/Fife_Ch37.pdf

September 28, 1805 to October 1808

Bedford County, Pennsylvania. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania hears a case involving a dispute over land on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River. John Ewing, James Ryland, and John Ryland (two brothers) are the defendants. Significantly, the court case shows a close relationship between John Ryland and John Ewing. Incidentally, the defendants won. See the John Ryland post for a transcript.

Therefore, William and Catherine had the opportunity – time and place – to get married.

Date of William and Catherine’s Marriage

When and where William and Catherine married is not completely clear, but we can make some educated guesses. More importantly, let’s keep track of their emotional rollercoaster ride, in a short span. Why a rollercoaster ride? Death, marriage, birth, old property, departure, new property . . . .

William and Catherine got married in Bedford or Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. Or a weaker possibility is that they may have married in Washington County, Maryland, for Bedford and Washington Counties border each other, and she possibly hails from Maryland. The census tables, below, are mixed. They say she comes (born?) either from Pennsylvania or Maryland. But one thing is certain. She had lived in Bedford County, and so did William, though he moved to Huntingdon County before 1811, when he appears in the single freemen’s list.

Then tragedy struck. William’s father John died before February 9, 1814. Since he died intestate, the court appointed William to be the administrator. In my experience, it did not take all that long for probate to be initiated, so he probably died in January.

William oversaw the Inventory and Appraisement, which means that good quality men, sworn by a court of law, traveled out to the farm of the recently deceased and examined all his goods and chattels and land, and valued it. This task was completed in March 1814. The question of the marriage date aside for a moment, I imagine all families who were required by law to go through this process had a difficult time. They had to witness all the personal items being inspected, while a clerk wrote down each one and its current price.

But William and Catherine have hope. On June 17, 1814, John Ewing, Catherine’s father and William’s father-in-law, of Bedford County, sells 160 acres to William for $315.87, in Ohio. The fact of this sale and its timing indicate – hint – that William and Catherine had recently married. What better way is there for the father-in-law and father to honor and bless the recent marriage than with a new beginning in new territory?

Good news arrived. Emotions were high again. It was during this active and eventful and tragic season – marriage and death – that William and Catherine had their first child Mary Ann, in March 1815. She’s healthy and lives through infancy. In fact her adult life is extremely interesting, but that’s a story for later.

Adding up all these facts together, we can locate William and Catherine’s marriage date within a range, as follows:

  1. William is still on the single freemen’s list in 1814.
  2. This list was written up in late winter or spring, for widow Ryland (John’s wife) appears for the first time in the same list in 1814, and John died before February 9, 1814. So now we know William is still single in late winter, early spring, 1814.
  3. William appears on the married freemen’s tax list for the first time in 1815.
  4. William’s first child is born in March 1815, and of course pregnancy lasts nine months, which takes us back to June 1814.

Therefore, William and Catherine married between the tax list in late winter and spring in 1814 and Mary Ann’s conception in June 1814.

Whichever month is the right one, emotions were high from the marriage and low from the tragedy – John’s death – during those few months in spring 1814.

Back to earth. William administered the estate until April 1815, when the court approved of his administrative duties. They again have hope. The court’s approval cleared the way for the new family’s move soon afterwards. So William and Catherine looked forward to their new beginning.

Summary:

  • Both John Ryland and John Ewing bought land in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, along the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River.
  • They are involved in a legal battle over land on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River (John Ryland’s brother James is also named in the suit).
  • Therefore, John Ryland’s son William and John Ewing’s daughter Catherine have the opportunity to marry.
  • They indeed marry in late 1813 or early 1814.
  • John Ryland dies in February 1814.
  • William oversees the inventory and appraisement, done by March 1814.
  • John Ewing sells land to William and Catherine, in Ashland County, Ohio, in June 1814.
  • William and Catherine have their first child in March 1815.
  • William finishes administering his father’s estate in April 1815.

Source for the Ewings: http://www.clanewing.org/books/EwingInEarlyAmerica/Fife_Ch37.pdf

Go to this online book for more information on the Ewings and click on Chapter XXXVII (37): http://www.clanewing.org/books/Document_Fife.html

See the John Ryland and John Ewing posts.

William Ryland as John’s Administrator and Son

We have established William and Catherine’s had the opportunity to marry in Bedford County and their marriage in spring 1814. But we have a loose end to tie up, an important one, too. None of these documents says John and William are father and son. Let’s look and the taxes in more detail and summarize William’s administrative duties

1808-1816

Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania.

 

Return and Assessment Tax

Hopewell Township

Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania

Year Married Freemen Single Freemen
1808 John Ryland has 100 acres, 1 sawmill, 1 horse, and 2 cows; property valued at 250.00; tax – $.65
1809 John Ryland has 100 acres, 1 sawmill, 1 horse, and 2 cows; property valued at $250.00; tax – none recorded
1810 John Ryland resides on 100 acres, 1 sawmill, 1 horse, and 2 cows; property valued at $250.00; tax – $.57
1811 John Ryland owns 3 horses and 2 cows; property valued at $100.00 tax – $.38 William Ryland first appears (barely legible ink) . . . . $.50?
1812 John Ryland owns 3 horses, two cows, property valued at $106.00; tax – $.38 William Ryland . . . .  $.50
1813 John Ryland has 3 horses, 2 cows; property valued at $106.00; tax – $.38 William Ryland . . . . .  $.50
Before February 9, 1814, John Ryland died, per probate records
1814 Widow Ryland owns 2 horses, 3 cows; property valued at $110.00 – tax $.21 William Ryland . . . . .  $.50
1815 William Riland has 2 horses, 1 cow; property valued $95.00 – tax $.10

Widow Ryland: crossed out: 2 horses, 3 cows; property valued at $.10 – tax $.02

1816 William Ryland, 2 horses, one cow; removed

Widow Ryland 1 cow; removed

 

Recall that William’s father John died before February 9, 1814, the date his probate was initiated. William was appointed the administrator. John’s Inventory and Appraisement was finished on March 7, 1814. William submitted his administrative duties in April term, 1815.

So how do we know John and William had a father-and-son relationship? First, let’s lay out the facts from the taxes and the probate, in Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania. Then we can interpret the facts.

Bare-bone facts:

  1. John, “widow,” and William share the same surname: Ryland.
  2. William was at least 21 years old in 1811, appearing in the single freemen’s list in that year for the first time.
  3. John dies before February 9, 1814, the date his probate is initiated.
  4. Widow first appears in 1814 tax list, which is recorded after February 9, 1814.
  5. William first appears in the married freemen’s tax list in 1815.
  6. The principals are of two generations: John and widow in the older generation; William in the younger.
  7. Early in 1814, William is appointed administrator of John’s estate.
  8. In 1815 widow Ryland’s property decreases in value, while William’s increases.
  9. John, widow, and William appear in one township and one county, in the same timeframe (1808-1816).
  10. There are no other Rylands living in that one location. Only John, widow, and William Ryland reside and are taxed in that specific township.
  11. William and widow “remove” or leave Hopewell Township, by 1816. Iin the major section on William, next, the History of Ashland County, OH, says William arrived there in fall 1815, and the Ashland Co. OH 1820 census reveals a white female over 45, most likely the widow Ryland.

Interpretation of the facts:

So why is father-and-son the most probable relationship, historically speaking? There are eight reasons for this.

First, appearing in the single freemen’s tax list for the first time in 1811, William was old enough to be the administrator of John’s estate, by the time John died before February 9, 1814.

Second, in 1814 William was appointed administrator, and in 1815 his property increased, while widow’s decreased, per the tax lists. As administrator, William is likely taking over the property.

Third, William was not John’s brother of the same given name, for the brother resided in distant Berks County, Pennsylvania, and died there in 1814 or more likely in 1816, in the same year or two years after older brother John died. William (the brother) is too old to travel and too far away to be the William in these records in Hopewell Township, Huntingdon County.

More tellingly, the younger William in the Hopewell tax list had just become 21 years old in 1811. This young age does not match the age of John’s brother William, who was an established family man by the time he died in 1814 or 1816.

Fourth, John’s brothers James and Andrew resided more closely geographically than William (the brother) did. Indeed, James may have settled on his property in Huntingdon County, and he lived long after both John and William (the brother) died. The court could have appointed James if it needed a brother to be the administrator. There’s no evidence that John, James, and Andrew fought each other. Indeed, the evidence suggests they stuck together, living next to each other in Bedford County. Recall the lawsuit recorded in St. Clair’s Bedford, in which they fought together (see the section “Deeds, Tax Lists, Lawsuit, and Censuses,” above). We must follow historical probabilities.

Fifth, the younger William in Huntingdon County was not John’s nephew. Why would the court appoint a nephew to be the administrator, when it had a brother available? John, James, and Andrew got along just fine as brothers. They were closer relationally and would have been more authoritative than a nephew who had just turned 21 years old. That’s the historical probability.

Sixth, John and William were not cousins. John’s father Paul did not have brothers in Pennsylvania. And hence the non-existent brothers did not have non-existent sons (John’s would-be cousins). In any case, John’s brothers as would-be administrators were closer relationally and would have been more authoritative than a cousin who had just turned 21 years old. So says historical probability.

Seventh, the court could have appointed widow to be the administrator of John’s estate, but the court didn’t. Instead, it appointed William, who had reached his majority and was a male with the same surname as John’s and widow’s. Male administrators were preferable, in those days, according to historical probability. Yet a widow would have been close relationally to be the administrator than a brother or cousin or nephew would have been, and widows were appointed as administrators back then.

Eight and finally, the three Ryland principals of John, widow, and William belonged to the same family and household. They are the only Rylands who appear in the tax records in the one Hopewell Township and the one Huntingdon County, at the same time (1808-1816). And William and widow “remove” at the exact same time. Recall also that widow Ryland’s property decreases dramatically, while William’s goes up, in 1815.

Therefore, the evidence for the father-and-son relationship more than meets the criterion of preponderance, historically speaking. Indeed, the evidence is highly probable that William Ryland was the oldest living male heir of John Ryland. This relational links in the chain between John, widow, and William are very strong.

Boiled down: the first and second reasons are legal proof because John (decd.) and William appear on the same court-sworn document.

WILLIAM AND CATHERINE’S MOVE TO OHIO

So William’s purchase of land in June 1814, his administrative duties ending in April 1815, and his and widow’s “removed” record in the taxes in Huntingdon County agree with another source. One history of Ashland County, published in 1863, says that William Ryland arrived in autumn 1815. It reads:

William Ryland emigrated from Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and entered at the land-office at Canton the farm upon which he now lives, in the autumn of 1815. His family then consisted of his wife and one daughter, Mary Ann, who is now the widow of Jonathan Black. (H. S. Knapp, A History of the Pioneer and Modern Times of Ashland County from the Earliest to the Present Date, Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1863, p. 289)

The excerpt goes on to name his neighbors, so I don’t need to transcribe it. Recall that William died in 1867, so H. S. Knapp got his information firsthand, from interviews with William and family. Autumn 1815, not late spring or early summer 1816, best fits the dates back in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and excludes the possibility that Catherine traveled while pregnant. Their journey came between the birth of their first child in March 1815 and their second one in November 1816. Catherine did not have to travel by wagon during a pregnancy.

Dates aside, the family tradition or story that the young families used two teams of horses and wagons and camped along the trail is a beautiful image. It certainly rings true, for that’s how pioneers families traveled.

Short History of Vermillion Township: Ashland and Richland Counties

County Map of OH

These two histories provide brevity and clarity:

AUGUST 9, 1814, Vermillion Township was formed. It occupied in the northeast corner of “Old Richland,” a territory which has since been divided into six townships, being then eighteen miles from north to south, and twelve east and west. Within the same year, however, this territory was again divided by a line through the center north and south, the east half retaining the name of Vermillion. In 1815, Vermillion was reduced to its present dimensions, six miles square, in the southern part of the territory. It was then on the east line of Richland, but became a part of Ashland County in 1846.

Source: http://www.heritagepursuit.com/Richland/RichlandChapLXXIII.htm

Ashland County formed on February 24, 1846. Residents chose the name in honor of Henry Clay, a prominent member of the Whig Party during this period. Clay’s home in Lexington, Kentucky, was named Ashland. Thomas Coulter established Perrysville, the first white settlement in Ashland County, in 1815, although individual whites had resided in the county for approximately fifty years before this date.

Source: http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=1890

In short, Ashland County was formed out of Richland and three other counties in 1846.

County Maps of Ohio

Here are some other maps.

1895

 Source: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~maggieoh/mrichland.html

Source: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~maggieoh/Gwen/maps.htm

Ashland County Maps

Source: http://www.ashlandcounty.org/map/index.cfm

http://www.myohiogenealogy.com/oh_county/asl.htm#Link298647C0

Richland (later Ashland) County, Ohio

After their arrival in Ohio in fall 1815, William lived over five decades and Catherine just under six decades in Richland (later Ashland) County, Ohio. The excerpt from Knapp’s history, quoted above, says they never left their farm, since their original purchase of it from their father and father-in-law John Ewing. In fact, it should not be called a farm until they make something of it. It was most likely undeveloped. But William already had training from his father John, so the son could be a successful farmer. Plus, he did not migrate alone. George Ewing and his family – Catherine’s brother – journeyed with the Rylands. The censuses demonstrate they were neighbors the entire time.

With support from new friends and family, William and Catherine were successful.

The rest of this post describes their life in the Buckeye State.

WILLIAM AND CATHERINE’S CHILDREN

William and Catherine (Ewing) Ryland had eleven children, all born in Richland County, Ohio. Recall that Ashland County was formed out of Richland and three other counties in 1846.

At a glance:

  1. Mary Ann (1815-1879)
  2. John (1816-1885)
  3. Elizabeth (1819-1889)
  4. Levi (1822-1868)
  5. Sarah (1825-1892)
  6. Susan or Susannah (born 1822-31 and died after 1890 and before 1899)
  7. William Jr. (1827-1888) Our direct line, so see his own post here and here.
  8. Wilson (1830-1905)
  9. James (1832-1873)
  10. Catherine A. (1835-1908)
  11. David (1836-1923)

Now we can look at their lives in more detail – or as much as the surviving documents allow us. We mostly use census records, with a few land sales and city directories tossed in. Tom Sloan of Ashland, Ohio, put together a short Family Group Sheet, which I use here. It is confirmed by gravestones and censuses and marriage and death indices.

  1. Mary Ann (Ryland) Black

She was born March 13, 1815 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. She married Jonathan S. Black, son of William Black and Sarah Stevens. Jonathan was born October 1809 and died on June 11, 1852, his gravestone saying 42 years and 9 months. I’m not sure why he died young. She died November 20, 1879; DAR, which transcribed Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, says she died on November 30, 1879. Mary Ann and Jonathan are buried near each other in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio, in Old Section, Part 1, Row 10.

More about them

Recall that Mary Ann’s parents William (Billy) and Catherine Ryland moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio in autumn 1815, so Mary Ann was just a baby during their long journey.

There are several unanswered questions and mysteries about her life. But first the known facts . . . .

Residing in Worthington Township, Richland County, He left a will, dated March 3, 1852 (recorded or probated 12 June 1852). He bequeaths to his unnamed wife (but she is an executor) one-third of real estate containing 51 acres, in Worthington Township; three cows, 16 sheep, all household and kitchen furniture, bed and bedding, and gold watch. To his four children Alethea Emaline, Luther Rice, Mary Catherine, and Ann Judson, he leaves two third of the estate. Executors are Mary Ann Black, William Ryland; bondsmen: James, George, and William Ewing; witnesses: James F. Halferty, David Wohrley. (Record of Wills vol. 1, p. 288)

Mary Ann’s husband Jonathan S. Black appears in the tax list for the years 1833, 1836, and 1837 (see the section on tax lists, below). So he’s an established member of the community,

Jonathan and Mary Ann’s children: Stephen K., Alethea E., Luther R., Mary C., Ann J.

Deeds are about land transactions, buying and selling. On July 7, 1837, Jonathan sells 130 acres for $2200.00. He buys nine acres for $225.00 on June 12, 1845. In April 1848, he sells land (no day or acreage given) for $450.00. On May 6, 1848, he sells ten acres for $225.00; on the same date he buys one acre from his father-in-law for $20.00 (see the section on deeds, below).

In the 1850 Census Mary Ann (35) and Jonathan (41) live in Worthington Township, Richland County, with their children Alethea E. (10), Luther R. (7), Mary C. (5), and Ann J. (2 months). So the family has a newborn. The value of their real estate is $700.00. Interestingly, Alethea E. was born in Illinois. Other censuses repeat this, so no doubt Jonathan and Mary Ann moved out there for a while but came back. Traveling west, only to return to the starting point back east, was done in the pioneer days. For example, Mary Ann’s brother John (#2 in the list of children, above) moved out to Missouri (1857) and then back to Ohio (1861). Finally, the census says Jonathan and Mary Ann come from Pennsylvania. That’s correct, though other later records miss it.

In the 1860 Census, Jonathan does not appear, for he died in 1852. Mary Ann (45) lives in Vermillion Township, Ashland County, with Aletha (sic) E. Winters (19); Luther R. (17), now a mail carrier; Mary C. (14); Ann J. (10); and Elliot Winters (18), a carpenter. Mary Ann’s real estate is valued at $500.00, and her personal estate at $200.00. Aletha is again said to be from Illinois, and she and Elliot Winters were married within the year, that is, 1859-1860.

In the 1870 Census, Mary Ann (54) lives in Vermillion Township, Ashland County, and is listed as keeping house. She must have some income of her own, probably from her property, whose value is now considerable. Her daughter Catherine (24) is a seamstress. Now we know Mary C.’s middle name, most likely named after her grandmother (our) Catherine (Ewing) Ryland, unless of course Catherine is named after someone on her father’s side. Ann J. (20) is not listed as having an occupation. Mary Ann’s real estate is valued at $1500.00, and her personal estate at $550.00. (Her brother David, widower, and his four children, plus his mother-in-law Mary Carn (66), live several homes down). Her property represents a huge increase. Recall that Mary Ann’s father (our) William Ryland Sr. died in 1867. And per his will, Mary Ann was to receive $200.00, which she got. Maybe Mary Ann invested wisely.

Before returning to Mary Ann, let’s find out what happened to her daughters Anna J. and Aletha E. and son-in-law Elliot Winters, the newlyweds back in 1860. Elliot and Aletha had two children who died as infants: Willie L., September 17, 1863, 1 year, 9 months, and 17 days; Leila (or Lula), February 15, 1862, 1 year, 7 months, and 1 day. They were buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County. Sad!

Interestingly, Elliott and Aletha appear in the 1870 Census, Prairie Township, Randolph County, Missouri, next door to our William Ryland (Slim’s father) and his (first) wife Sarah. Elliott is 27, and Aletha (29) goes by the more common name Emiline (sic). They still don’t have any kids. But they had the pioneer spirit, going out to Missouri between the 1860 and 1870 Censuses. No doubt our William and Elliot – uncle and nephew – exchanged letters. William, it will become clear in his posts, liked to help young men out, per his censuses.

Anna’s tombstone reads: Annie J. Black, 1 June 1850 to 26 January 1874. We now know Anna went by Annie, and she never married. On the side of her tombstone, we discover: Emma A. Winters, 15 June 1840 to 23 June 1877. So Emma preferred her more common name so much that Aletha was recorded as the middle initial A. Anyway, does this mean Emma was buried near her sister, or was her memory honored with an inscription on the same stone, though she died elsewhere? Recall that our William Jr. (Slim’s father) died in Kansas and has a large gravestone, and on its side his kids by his first wife Sarah put an inscription on it for their mother, who died back in Missouri. If it’s the first option (Emma was buried near her sister), then she returned to Ohio from Missouri after the 1870 Census. But if it’s the second option (she died elsewhere), then her family back in Ohio received a very sad letter. Either way, they honored her with an inscription on Annie’s gravestone. Finally, when did Elliott die, and where was he buried? I have been unable to track him after his 1870 Census.

Most tragically, Mary Ann died in 1879, so her two daughters Annie and Emma predeceased her (1874 and 1877, respectively). We always hear how tough it is on the parents when their kids die before they do. Ouch! In fact, Annie J. predeceased her grandmother (our) Catherine, who died in October 1874. More research needs to be done on Jonathan and Mary Ann’s offspring, like Mary Catherine Black.

For more information on Mary Ann’s son Stephen K. Black – a lot more information – see Susan Ryland, below.

Now let’s return to Mary Ann, our William and Catherine’s firstborn. Fortunately, we have some details about her passing, in the U.S. Federal Mortality Schedule, which, in the year in question, began on June 1, 1879 and ended May 31, 1880. It says she died a widow in November (1879), at 64. She was “keeping house,” meaning she stayed at home, most likely living off her property. The cause of death was tuberculosis, while she lived in Vermillion Township, Ashland County. E. V. Kendig, physician, attended her.

Though Mary Ann lived a full life, questions remain. For example, in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses, why does her son Stephen K. Black, born about 1841, live with his grandparents and not his parents? Next, Mary Ann and her husband Jonathan had a son named Luther B., but he died young, his gravestone reading August 3, 1861, 8 years, 4 months, and 25 days. It says he’s the son of Jonathan and Mary Ann Black. That makes his time of birth early April 1853, doesn’t it? Recall that his dad Jonathan died June 11, 1852, 42 years and 9 months. Does anyone want to calculate the time between Luther’s birth (and conception) and Jonathan’s passing away? Finally, Mary Ann has a son named Luther R. who appears in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses. Would she have two sons by that name? Has the gravestone been transcribed accurately? What about the accuracy of the censuses?

To wrap up the highlights, Mary Ann lived a full life as an original Ohio pioneer, arriving as a baby with her young parents (our) William and Catherine Ryland. By all accounts, her parents were prosperous and happy living the farm life. They knew how to manage things. Yet, grownup Mary Ann encountered some tragedy. Her husband died at 42 years young. Her two daughters and son Luther predeceased her, if we have all the facts on this son. Her two daughters certainly predeceased her. Her other son Stephen K. lived with his grandparents, not his mother. That’s a puzzle. Mary Ann died of tuberculosis.

If anyone out there can solve these mysteries about Mary Ann (Ryland) Black, email us.

But let’s not end Mary Ann’s biography section on a sad note, despite the unanswered questions.

It’s clear she was a survivor. She was tough, resilient. She knew how to carry on through tragedy. To me, Mary Ann (Ryland) Black was the American Pioneer Woman. I’m glad to be related to her, if only remotely.

Here is a photo of the cemetery’s entrance:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GRid=23774872&CRid=43905&

And here’s a photo of her grave marker:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24114183

And here is Jonathan’s gravestone:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24114180

  1. John Ryland

He was born November 12, 1816, in Richland County, Ohio; he married Mary Ann Dally (Dolly or Daily), on November 27, 1838 in Richland County, Ohio. According to his gravestone, he died October 9, 1885, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio. Mary Ann Dally was born on April 1, 1815 in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and died on July 23, 1908, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery. See the link, above, for a photo of the cemetery entrance.

More about them

John is an extremely common name, but I like to think he was named after his grandfathers John Ryland and John Ewing Sr.

One researcher comes up with these children of John and Mary Ann: Henry P.; William Armstrong (d. in Boone County, Missouri); Nathan D. (b. 1846 in Knox County, Ohio and d. February 17, 1927, in Vermillion Township, and buried in Hayesville, Ashland County; he was widowed and his wife was Louisa); Emaline; Wilson (d. on May 21, 1901, from gallstones. He was cited as single at the time of his death); John F.; George (1852 to Jan 1934); Benton (b. about 1860 in Missouri); Amanda (b. February 1860 in Missouri).

The 1850 Census, Vermillion Township, Ashland County, shows that they have these children: Mary C. (Catherine) (10), William A. (Armstrong) (7), Nathan D. (David) (4), and Alethra E. (Emaline) (2). Residing one home away from (our) William Jr. and two from (our) William Sr., they share the farm house with John’s sister Sarah and her husband Benjamin, who have little A. J., a newborn. It is an interesting fact that John’s older sister Mary Ann Black (see above) has a daughter named Aletha (Alethea) Emaline. The first names are close.

John and Mary Ann Ryland moved to Missouri with (our) William Jr. in fall 1857. In the following excerpt, N. D. Ryland is Nathan David, John and Mary Ann’s son. James Ewing is either our Catherine (Ewing) Ryland’s brother or nephew. Here’s the write up:

N. D. RYLAND was born in Knox county, Ohio, February 19, 1846. His parents came to Ashland county about the year 1850, and bought a farm about a mile and a half south of Hayesville, where they remained until the fall of 1857, when they sold their farm and emigrated to Randolph county, Missouri. In the fall of 1861 they returned to Ohio, and bought a farm one mile south of Hayesville. The next spring he sold his farm and removed to the farm of James Ewing, and, at the end of two years, bought a farm adjoining the one owned by N. D. Ryland, where they lived some ten years, when they concluded they would leave the farm, and try town life. They rented the farm and moved to Hayesville, where they now reside . . . . (Source: G. W. Hill, History of Ashland County, p. 302)

This excerpt does not give the reason for their return to Ohio, but Mary Ann (Dally) Ryland’s obituary, below, says it was the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861. Further, their son William Armstrong remained in Missouri.

William Armstrong’s son, William Armstrong Jr., was murdered by a neighboring farmer.

Friday, 14 Mar 1919, Vol 32. No 47–WM L. ROBERTS TO PENITENTIARY—Sheriff Fred Whitesides, of Columbia, came to Sturgeon today (Wednesday) and took Wm. L. Roberts into custody, under an order of the Supreme Court of Missouri, affirming the decision of the Boone county Circuit Court, assessing punishment at 20 years in the penitentiary for having killed William A. Ryland, on the 30th day of July, 1917, about four miles southwest of Sturgeon, Mo. This case created considerable excitement in the neighborhood and was one of the most unexpected killings ever had in this community, as both Ryland and Roberts were considered the best of friends. The defendant was tried on the 27th and 28th of November, 1917 at Columbia, Mo., before the Hon. David H. Harris, judge and a jury. He was represented by Arthur Bruton and W. H. Hulett of Centralia, Mo, and Frank G. Harris of Columbia, Mo. The State was represented by W. M. Dinwiddie, Prosecuting Attorney, and H. C. Anderson of Columbia, Mo. Defendant has been out on bond since his conviction awaiting the determination of the Supreme Court on his appeal–Sturgeon Leader.

Source: http://listsearches.rootsweb.com/th/read/MORANDOL/2001-05/0989380310

See this link for William A. Ryland Jr’s death certificate:

http://www.sos.mogov/TIF2PDFConsumer/DispPDF.aspx?fTiff=/archives/DeptofHealth/Death/1917/1917_00025540.TIF&Fln=67989.pdf

You can read about the foul play in this newspaper article and photo of his house.

http://www.columbiamissourian.com/news/boone-junction-anticipates-two-more-historic-homes/article_66a0da0b-ffab-576f-8a60-587062ecc06e.html

But let’s get back to William Armstrong Ryland Jr.’s grandfather and grandmother, John and Mary Ann.

Before they moved back to Ohio, they had bought land on July 1, 1859, from Charles H. Prather and his wife Eliza J. of Boone County. John paid a large sum: $3500.00 for 160 acres of two tracts, located as follows:

The southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 4, Township 51, Range 13, lying in Boone County; and the east half of the southeast quarter and the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 36, Township 52, Range 13, lying in Randolph County, all containing 160 acres. (Boone County Deed Book 31, pages 201-02).

Thus John’s Missouri land crossed over into two counties.

John and his family appear in the 1860 Census, near Renick Township, Randolph County, Missouri. He’s 44 (birth = 1816), and Mary Ann is 45 (b. = 1815). These are the children: Mary R. (19), Armstrong (18), Nathan (14), Emaline (12), Wilson (8), John (7), George (7), Amanda (5), Benton (3 ½).  So they had twin boys John and George, and Emaline preferred her middle name instead of Alethra; Emaline is more common or better known.

From the 1860 Census, we can now conclude John and Mary Ann have these nine children: Mary Catherine (R, above, is an error), William Armstrong, Nathan David, Alethra Emaline, Wilson, John, George, Amanda, and Benton, though Mary Ann’s obituary gives us a different total (see below).

In the meantime, what was life like in Renick, Missouri? Why would John and Mary Ann move back to Ohio? The Randolph County Historical Society’s brief write up of the county says that during the Civil War (1861-1865) historical events were volatile. Their write up says the town of Renick burned twice.

http://www.randolphhistory.com/randolph-county-overview/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Dixie_(Missouri)

This link says a battle took place in Renick, on November 1, 1861:

http://home.usmo.com/~momollus/MOBAT/B1861.htm

It is no wonder John and Mary Ann and their family left Renick and moved back to Ohio.

After John and Mary Ann moved back to Ashland County, their younger brother (our) William (Slim’s dad) buys, August 10, 1864, the 160 acres that they had bought on July 1, 1859. The price — $2000.00 – was much cheaper than the one John had paid: $3500.00. So John took a hit. Again, the land is located in both Missouri counties of Boone and Randolph:

The east half of the southeast quarter of Section 36, Township 52, Range 13; also the southwest quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 4 of Township 51, Range 13.

Transcription ends.

John Ryland signs his name, while the clerk indicates Mary Ann made her mark. She affirms that she agreed to the sale willingly, without compulsion, on August 11, 1864. Recorded November 14, 1865, Boone County, Missouri, Book 34, pages 144-45.

However, it should be noted that John’s son William Armstrong Ryland was about 22 years old in 1864, so he could have purchased the 160 acres. But I believe this William is John’s brother (Slim’s dad), not son, for $2000.00 and 160 acres is a huge amount back then for a 22-year-old. Would a bank extend that much credit to a young man?

See the William Ryland Jr. posts here and here for more information.

In any case, they are now back in Ashland County, Ohio. Mary Ann’s father-in-law (our) William Ryland Sr.’s probate papers say she took care of her him and got paid for her troubles – though surely it was no trouble. I imagine it as a labor of love. I also imagine she employed the help of her daughters and sons to minister to their grandfather. But the fact that Mary Ann had to take care of him, in addition to William’s wife and daughter Susan – implies he may have been undergoing a difficult illness. It also implies Mary Ann had a kind and compassionate heart, getting along quite well with her father-in-law, the pioneer to the Buckeye State.

In the 1870 Census, Vermillion Township, Ashland County, John (53) is a farmer and the occupation of Mary A. (54) is not listed, nor is it for their children. It correctly says he’s from Ohio and she’s from Pennsylvania, though she may be born in Maryland. These offspring live with them: Nathan (24) Wilson (19), John F. (18), George (18), Amanda (14), and Benton (9). Nathan and his father John are marked in the category as 21 years or older, so they’re eligible to vote. George and Amanda are said to have attended school within the year, while the other kids are not so marked. All of them live one farm down from John’s younger sister Catherine and her husband Peter Reading (see below). Since John and Mary Ann’s farm is valued highly at $12,000, and the personal estate comes to $1910. Why? Recall what the excerpt quoted above says. Specifically, they bought an already-established farm and lived there ten years. No doubt John and his sons knew what they were doing in improving its value.

In the 1880 Census, Hayesville, Ashland County, John and Mary Ann live within the town itself. He (64) is a retired farmer and Mary A. (65) is keeping house, that is, stays at home. Interestingly, the census taker had written that John came from Pennsylvania, but crossed that out and wrote “Ohio.” So we shouldn’t be too hard on the census takers, for they get things right many more times than otherwise. Also, the informant (the one who fed the information to the census taker) intended to ensure accuracy about origins, so perhaps he had the census taker cross out the wrong word. This is more and strong evidence that John indeed was born in Ohio. These offspring live with them: Wilson (27), “at home”; Amanda (25) “at home”; Benton (20) “works on farm”; and granddaughter Jennie M. McClure (8). All of the kids are single. It says Wilson cannot write, and Benton and Jennie attended school within the year. The three-generation family lives next door to John’s younger sister Catherine and her husband Peter Reading (see below).

According to J. A. Caldwell’s Atlas of Ashland County (p. 32), land records reveal that John owns three-quarters acre in town, next to Peter Reading. So the census and the atlas agree. The history about their move to and from Missouri, quoted above, says John and Mary Ann rented the farm, so maybe Benton is the one who took it over, since the3 1880 Census says he worked on the farm. The excerpt also confirms their town life.

To be written about in a history and atlas about Ashland County indicates that the John Ryland family had achieved some measure of prominence. They were also prosperous farmers.

In the 1900 Census, Vermillion, Mary A. is the head of household, born in April 1815, 85 years old, widowed, with 12 children, 8 of whom are still living (but not with her), and she comes from Pennsylvania. She owns her house in town (Vermillion) free of mortgage. The census taker notes that she can read and write, but then crosses out his “yes” for “can write” and puts in “no.” Her son Wilson lives with her. He too was born in April, but in 1852, so he’s 48; he’s marked as single, not widowed, so he didn’t get married by 1900. He’s listed as unable to read or write. Finally, Mary’s daughter Amanda also lives with her. She is said to be born in February 1860, 40 years old, and single, not widowed. So neither did she marry by 1900. She can read and write. The census taker says Amanda was born in Ohio, but her parents lived in Missouri in 1860, so we have a census error.

One puzzle about John and Mary Ann’s son Wilson. He remained single all his life. Was he mentally or physically handicapped or challenged, as we say nowadays? The 1870 and 1880 Censuses have categories for this, but they are unmarked for him. Yet the 1900 Census says he was unable to read or write and lived with his parents throughout his life. His gravestone says he was born 24 Apr. 1851 and died May 21, 1901, so he predeceased his mother Mary Ann. Though there’s a mismatch between his gravestone and the 1900 Census, he and John and Mary Ann are buried near each other in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery. If anyone out there has answers on Wilson, email us.

John Ryland’s gravestone says his life span was 1816-1885, but it also says he was 88 years, 10 months, and 27 days when he died. So we have a mismatch with his date of birth. Recall that the History of Pioneer and Modern Times of Ashland County (1863), cited above, and strong family tradition say only little Mary Ann (Ryland) Black traveled from Pennsylvania to Ohio with her parents (our) William and Catherine Ryland in 1815. So John’s birth year 1816 is preferred in my view.

John’s wife Mary Ann Dally’s gravestone says her life span is 1814-1908, dying at 93 years, 7 months, and 27 days, placing her birth in late December 1814. But the 1900 Census says she was born in April, and her obituary, below, says April 1, 1815. John and Mary Ann are buried near each other and near his father and mother William and Catherine, in Old Section, Part 2, Row 10.

The obituary on Mary Ann (Dally) Ryland, in the Ashland Ohio Press on July 29, 1908, confirms their journey out to Missouri in fall 1857 and return to Ohio in fall 1861. It notes the reason for the return: the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861. Note the spelling variation on Mary Ann’s family name.

Hayesville. Mrs. Mary Ann Ryland passed peacefully away Thursday morning at six o’clock at her home on North street, Hayesville, Ohio. Mary Ann Dolly, daughter of Nathan and Mary Dolly, was born April 1st 1815 in Washington County, Pennsylvania. In the early days she came with her parents to Mohicanville, this county. In 1838 she was united in marriage to John Ryland, the eldest son of Wm. and Catherine Ryland. To this union [between Mary Ann and John] twelve children were born – seven sons and five daughters – Armstrong, Wilson, Sarah, Ellen, and an infant died some years ago. Catherine, of Leroy, Kansas; Mrs. A. E. McClure, of Ashland; J. F. and B. L. of Bucyrus; George, of Mansfield; N. D. and Amanda, of Hayesville, survive. Her husband died twenty-three years ago the 9th of last October. Mrs. Ryland had seven brothers and five sisters who preceded her in death, she being the last member of her family. In the fall of 1857 they moved to Boone county, Missouri, where they lived four years and in the fall of 1861 when the [Civil] war broke out they came back to Ashland county. Mrs. Ryland was one of the pioneers of this county, being especially well known about and in Hayesville where she lived for thirty-four years. When a girl, Mrs. Ryland joined the Methodist Church but after she was married she went with her husband to the Baptist Church in this place and after that church was broken up they joined the Presbyterian Church where she lived a constant Christian life until her death. At the time of her death she was aged 93 years, 3 months, and 22 days. Funeral service were held at her late home Saturday morning at ten o’clock conducted by Rev. Hastings, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, assisted by Rev. Ruth of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of this place. Interment in the cemetery at Hayesville where her husband and her son are buried.

Attending were: B. L. Ryland and wife and children, Wahneta and Clarence, and Donald, and John Ryland and wife and Howard Ryland and wife, Harry Ryland and wife, of Bucyrus; George Ryland and wife and children, Mabel and Ray, Walter Ryland and wife, of Mansfield; Mrs. Emma McClure, Mrs. Mary Greenamyer and daughter Helen, and Misses Louisa and Mary Riddle, A. Hostler and George Johnson, of Ashland; Curtis Ryland and wife, of Reedsburg; Mr. R. Campbell and wife, Loudonville; Alva Ingmand and daughter, Emma, of Jeromeville.

Transcription ends.

The censuses record nine children, except the 1900 Census, which says that Mary Ann had twelve, but without naming them. This obituary also says there are twelve, namely: (1) (William) Armstrong; (2) Wilson; (3) Sarah; (4) Ellen; (5) unnamed infant; (6) (Mary) Catherine; (7) A. (Alethra) E. (Emaline) McClure; (8) J. (John) F.; (9) B. (Benton) L.; (10) George, (11) N. (Nathan) D. (David); and (12) Amanda.

In addition to the unnamed infant, the two names that do not appear in the censuses are Sarah and Ellen. John and Mary Ann got married in 1838, so there was still enough time for Sarah and Ellen to be named in the 1850 Census before they got married and had new surnames. Can anyone out there supply us with information on these two daughters? If so, email us.

But let’s not end John and Mary Ann’s biography section on mysteries and mismatches.

John was born to early Ohio pioneers, (our) William and Catherine Ryland. As a child, Mary Ann Dally, it seems, traveled with her parents from Pennyslvania, so she is a “child” pioneer to the Buckeye State. John and Mary Ann moved out to Missouri with (our) William Jr. in fall of 1857, but with the eruption of the Civil War in 1861, they moved back to Ohio. In fact their town Renick out in Missouri was burned down twice, and there was a small battle there in November 1861. (Our William and his family stayed in Missouri). John and Mary Ann encountered two tragedies: one infant died, and their son William Armstrong was murdered out in Missouri, according to family tradition. John died in 1885, so Mary Ann had to carry on without him for 23 years. Fortunately, she had plenty of children – an abundance of sons – to give her a helping hand. It also appears that her son Wilson lived with his parents throughout their lives, until he died in 1901. Mary Ann was a Methodist – Baptist – Presbyterian. We also learn that John was a Baptist. No doubt their faith sustained them through the tough times and tragedies.

Since John and Mary Ann (Dally) Ryland lived such full and rich lives and had such wonderful children, it is no mystery to me why she was honored with a marvelous and detailed obituary in 1908.

John’s grave marker, Vermillion Cemetery, Hayesville, Ashland County:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774870

Here is her obituary:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774871

Nathan David’s (1846-1927) and Eliza’s (1850-1924) grave marker, Vermillion Cemetery, Hayesville, Ashland County:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024451

Wilson’s (Apr. 24, 1850-May 21, 1901) grave marker:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774869&

  1. Elizabeth (Ryland) Black

She was born October 15, 1819. She married Daniel Black on September 20, 1840, in Richland County, Ohio, who is the son of William Black and Sarah Stevens. She died March 15, 1889, in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio. Daniel Black married a second time to Ellen Cara Bittinger on February 18, 1892. The 1900 Census says he was born December 1817, in Ohio.

More about them

Daniel and Elizabeth Black appear in the 1850 Census, Green Township, Ashland County, Ohio. Daniel (32) is a farmer from Ohio; E. is 27; W. K. is 9; M. E. is 5; and William Black is 80, so he’s Daniel’s father – or grandfather?

Daniel and Elizabeth can also be found in the 1860 Census, same township, enjoying this household: Daniel the head (40), farming and having $2610 in real property and $700 in personal assets; Elizabeth (39); William R. (19); a farm laborer; Mary E. (15); Willard M. (9). One researcher says William’s middle name is Riley, and Mary’s is Ellen.

In the 1870 Census, same township, Daniel (52) is “keeping house” (i.e. staying at home) and owning $8,300 in his personal estate, a huge amount. The census clerk may have intended to put that figure in the real estate column. Elizabeth (51) is keeping house; Mary E. (20) is also keeping house. A man named Riby Black (30) is “farming at home” and from Illinois.

In the 1880 Census, Mansfield, Richland County, Daniel (62) is a laborer, and Elizabeth (61) is keeping house. Their son William R. (38) and his wife Mary E. (31) (Mary is an extremely common name) and their four kids live next door. William is a farm laborer and she keeps house. Daniel and Elizabeth’s other son Willard M. (28) and Mary S. (26) and their two kids live one house over. He’s a baker, and she keeps house. The census was taken in Mansfield, the seat of Richland County, and the occupations of all their neighbors are typically done in town. So it seems Daniel and Elizabeth moved into Mansfield proper. If Daniel’s a laborer, then what happened to their valuable farm, seen in the 1870 Census?

In the 1881-1882 Mansfield city directory, which is like our phone book but without the phone numbers, plus a little more information, Daniel Black is a teamster and lives on 210 S. Main. Elizabeth must live with him, since she died in 1889. He is on page 32 in the search engine, but page 38 in the directory itself, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1881-1894.The+Herald’s+Directory+To+Mansfield%2c+Ohio+1881-82.32

The same is true in the 1883-1884 city directory, page 12 in the search engine, but page 38 in the directory itself, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1881-1894.The+Herald’s+Directory+Mansfield%2c+Ohio+1883-84.12

The same is true for the 1886-1887 directory, page 24 in the search engine, but page 42 in the directory itself, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1881-1894.Mansfield+Directory+1886-87.24

In the 1891 city directory, he lives in the same house. He must be a bachelor, since he marries a second time in 1892. It’s on page 20 in the search engine, but page 47 in the directory, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1881-1894.The+Mews+Printing+Company’s+Mansfield+and+Richland+County+Directory+1891.20

1894 directory, page 61 in the search engine, page 86 in the directory itself:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1895-1901.Mansfield+City+Directory+1894.61

In the 1895 directory, Daniel and his new wife Ellen lived on 485 South Main, according to page 61, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1895-1901.Mansfield+City+Directory+1894.61

In the 1897-1898 directory, he and Ellen live in the same house, page 42 in the search engine, page 76 in the directory:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1895-1901.The+Lane+Directory+Co’s+Mansfield+City+Directory+1897-98.42

In the 1900 Census, Mansfield City, Richland County, Daniel is said to be 82, born December 1817, and from Ohio, while his parents came from Maryland. He cannot read or write. He owns his house free of mortgage. Ellen C. (62) is his second wife, married to him nine years, and born in March 1838. The number of children is 8, and 7 are still living, but not with them. Clearly, the kids issue from their first marriages. Did the parents note them in the census as one group, though they had them in their first marriages, separately? Finally, the census says she can read and write.

In the 1901 city directory, Daniel resides on 485 Main Street, Mansfield, with his wife Ellen C., on page 45 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/view.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Mansfield.1895-1901.Mansfield+Official+City+Directory+1901.45

So now we know he lived past that year, but so far no evidence has turned up to pin down his date of death.

  1. Levi Ryland

He was born April 21, 1822, in Richland County, Ohio. He married Lydia on a date that is not yet known. He died December 21, 1868.

More about them

Lydia is mentioned in William Ryland’s final estate account, below, dated 1870, and says she’s a widow. Son: Wilson; daughter: Sara Lutz.

More about them

Someone did email us a few years back. Her’s what we now know:

Lydia is mentioned in William Ryland’s final estate account. She is named as a widow and was paid $146.66 on June 14, 1875.

The final account table of Levi’s father William also says Levi’s son was Wilson and his daughter was Sara Lutz, so Sarah Ryland married a Mr. Lutz. The account table appoints Paul Oliver to be the unnamed children’s guardian. Does this mean Levi had more children, who were minors?

Levi and Lydia are hard to track down, no matter how hard we look. If anyone out there has more information, email us.

It turns out someone did email us in April 2012, responding to an earlier post elsewhere. He is a relative, not a direct descendant of Levi’s daughter Mary Ellen.

Lydia’s maiden name was Burns. After Levi’s death she married John McKisson.

Here is what the new information says:

1870 OH, Ashland, Green:
McKisson John S. D. 28 Blacksmith 300 PA
McKisson Lydia 34 Keeps house 2500 300 OH
Riland Mary E. 07 At home OH
Riland Sarah 16 At home OH
Riland Lucretia J. 10 At home OH
Riland Lillie M. 01 OH

1880 Census Place Greene, Ashland, Ohio, p 25C:
John MC KISSON Self 38 PA Artist Engraver IRE PA
Lidda MC KISSON Wife 45 OH Keep House OH PA
William MC KISSON Son 08 OH School PA OH
Losetta RILAND SDau 19 OH Home OH OH
Mary RILAND SDau 17 OH Home OH OH
Lidda M. RILAND SDau 11 OH School OH OH

Lydia’s death certificate:

Marion County Volume #1576, Certificate #10224
Name: Lydia McKisson
Death Date: 28 Feb 1915
Death Place: Marion, Marion, Ohio
Cause: Broncho Pneumonia
Birth Date: 14 Jan 1835
Birthplace: Trumbull Co., Ohio
Death Age: 80 years 1 month 4 days
Marital Status: Married
Street Address: 106 Superior, 3rd Ward
Occupation: Housewife
Burial Date: 02 Mar 1915
Burial Place: Perrysville, Ohio
Father’s Name: Levi Burns
Father’s Birthplace: Ohio
Mother’s Name: Sarah Schwartz [possibly Swarts]
Mother’s Birthplace: Ohio

Lydia (Burns) (Ryland) McKisson is buried at Perrysville Union Cemetery, Perrysville, Ashland, Ohio.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=88168803

Here is the death certificate of Mary Ellen Ryland Stearns:

Name: Mary Ellen Stearns
Death Date: 22 Feb 1931
Death Place: Columbus, Franklin, Ohio
Birth Date: 05 Jul 1863
Birthplace: Perrysville, Ohio
Death Age: 67 years 7 months 17 days
Marital Status: Widowed
Street Address: 44 E. Longview Ave.
Occupation: Housekeeper
Residence: Columbus, Franklin, Ohio
Burial Date: 24 Feb 1931
Burial Place: Marion, Ohio
Spouse’s Name: Mathias Stearns
Father’s Name: Levi Ryland
Father’s Birthplace: Ohio
Mother’s Name: Lydia Burns
Mother’s Birthplace: Ohio
Informant: Nellie Tucker, 44 E. Longview Ave.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=88168856

  1. Sarah (Sally) (Ryland) McKinley

She was born July 4, 1825 in Richland County, Ohio. She married Benjamin Starkey McKinley on September 10, 1848, in Ashland County, Ohio. He was born on July 31, 1825, Juniata, Pennsylvania. She died November 1, 1892 and is buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio. Benjamin died on December 25, 1902, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Ashland County, Ohio.

More about them

Benjamin McKinley’s mother was born Mary Ann Starkey (1800-1874).

Benjamin and Sarah appear in the 1850 Census, Vermillion Township. He’s 24, a farmer, and from Pennsylvania; she’s 25 and from Ohio. Their son is named A. J. (8 months). They live with her brother John and his wife Mary Ann and their four kids (see John’s section, above).

One researcher names these children: Adoniran M. Judson (b. 1849 in Ohio and d. in 1918); Sylvanus Emmer; Lilly Alice; Sarah Agnes.

In the 1860 Census, Vermillion Township, Benj. (34) and Sarah (34) have these children: Judson (10), son Cirenuss (sic) (8), Lilly A. (6), Sarah A. (2), and Julia Elmer (11). Julia Elmer is the oldest, but she doesn’t appear in the 1850 Census. The value of their real estate is $4000, and the personal estate is $2200. Benjamin and Sarah have Peter and Catherine (Ryland) Redding (Reading) for neighbors (see below). Sarah and Catherine are sisters. So where did Julia Elmer come from? She is said to be the oldest, but doesn’t appear in the 1850. Also, she doesn’t appear in the 1870 Census.

If anyone out there can solve this mystery, email us.

In the 1870 Census, Vermillion, Ashland County, Benjamin (44) is a farmer. Sarah (44) and he own a farm valued at $7700; the personal estate is $2231. He is said to be from Pennsylvania, and she is said to be from Ohio. These kids live with them: Judson (20), a farm laborer; Sylvanus E. (18); Alice A. (sic) (15); and Sarah A. (11). Sylvanus and Alice attended school within the year.

In the 1880 Census, Vermillion, Benjamin (54) is a farmer and Sarah (54) keeps house. He and his parents are recorded as coming from Pennsylvania, while she’s from Ohio and her parents are from Pennsylvania. Her mother Catherine Ryland may have been born in Maryland, but she certainly resided in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Judson A. (29) is a farmer, and Sarah (20) is at home and attended school within the year.

In the 1900 Census, Vermillion, Benjamin (74) has married a second time to Martha (58), in 1894. She is said to be born in October 1841 and he in July 1825. He is still a farmer at his age, and rents a house. He cannot read or write, but she can. Tilly McKinley (62) lives next door, so this is mostly likely his sister. She is single, not widowed. Lydia McKinley (60) lives with the Sigler family two houses up; she’s the mother-in-law to the head of household. Lydia’s, Tilly’s and Benjamin’s parents come from Pennsylvania. Surely they are siblings. Two years later Benjamin dies, on Christmas day.

This charming excerpt comes from another history of Ashland County, published in 1880. Authors took time to collect their information, so we don’t know when he actually interviewed the McKinleys. Yet the 1880 Census confirms Hill’s findings.

Hill Writes:

Benjamin S. McKinley was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1825. In 1835, he came to Ohio with his parents, and settled in what is now Mohican township, Ashland county. September 10, 1848, he was married to Sarah Ryland, daughter of William and Catherine Ryland, who were among Ashland county’s early settlers. Mr. and Mrs. McKinley’s parents are dead. They have four children, two son and two daughters: Judson, Lillie Alice, Emer, and Sadie Agnes. Lillie Alice is the wife of Abraham Hossler, who owns a farm adjoining his father-in-law. Emer married Mary Brubaker, of Mohican township, and owns a farm adjoining Mr. Hossler. Judson owns a farm adjoining his father’s pace, but as he is yet living in single blessedness, he makes his home with his parents. Sadie Agnes is yet unmarried and lives at home. Mr. McKinley is one of the most thorough, go-ahead farmers of Vermillion township, and is a neighbor highly respected by all who know him. Though a very hard worker for a man his age, he is genial and companionable. He loves a good horse, and has the gratification of having some that he has raised on his own farm. In politics he is a Democrat Both himself and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church at Hayesville, Ohio. (G. W. Hill, History of Ashland County, Ohio, Williams Bros. 1880, p. 304)

Transcription ends.

To wrap up their short biography, so far the records indicate Sarah and Benjamin had four kids, though only the 1860 Census lists Julia Elmer, yet she doesn’t reappear in the 1870 Census, so we have a mystery or a mistake in the 1860 Census. However, let’s not end on puzzles and mysteries.

Their mother Sarah died when she was 67. Benjamin remarried to Martha in 1894, and still lived in Vermillion Township. So he didn’t want to be lonely. Benjamin died at 77.

Sarah and Benjamin were buried next to each other in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Old Section, Part 2, Row 12. He is buried next to other McKinleys and Starkeys (his mother’s maiden name).

Here is a photo of their gravestone:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=23774748

  1. Susan Ryland

She was born 1822 to 1831; the 1850 Census says she’s 24 years old (= b. 1826). The 1860 Census records her age at 29 (b. 1831). The 1870 Census says she’s 40 (= b. 1830). The 1880 Census says she’s 58 (= b. 1822). So in other words, we don’t know yet when she was born. So her birth order could be placed elsewhere in the list of children. She died sometime after 1890 and before 1899, in Akron, seat of Summit County, Ohio.

More about her

She lived the most interesting life, thanks in large part to her nephew Stephen K. Black, who was the son of Mary Ann (Ryland) Black (see #1, above). Several questions remain (so far) unanswered about Susan. But first we look into the known facts.

In the 1850 Census, Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Susannah (24) lives with her parents and their large family. Stephen Black (9) lives with his grandparents, even though his parents Jonathan S. and Mary Ann (Ryland) Black reside in neighboring Richland County. See the table in William and Catherine’s Census section, below.

In the 1860 Census, Vermillion, Susan (29) lives with her father (our) William (72), mother (our) Catherine (66), and nephew Stephen K. Black (14), son of Jonathan S. and Mary Ann (Ryland) Black. As noted in the Mary Ann section, above, it is a puzzle as to why Stephen does not live with his mother who also resided in Vermillion Township in 1860. By then, maybe Stephen was so used to his grandparents and his mother Mary Ann lived so close, he didn’t see the need to move back with his mother. He attended school within the year. See William and Catherine’s Census section, below.

In the 1870 Census, Hayesville-Vermillion Township, Susan (40) and her mother Catherine (74) live with Stephen K. Black (23), son of Mary Ann (Ryland) Black. In the 1860 Census, he lived with them, but now the roles are reversed. He and Rosina (18) have one child Lunette (7 months). Stephen is a druggist, at his young age, but this career choice will grow, as the rest of this section on Susan will show. The occupations of their neighbors further indicate they moved into town. Susan is not listed as married in the census, but as having $2,000.00 in real property and $500.00 in personal property, so she was certainly not poor, as a single woman. Her father died in 1867, so no doubt she got some assets from the estate. In fact she was to receive $900. See William and Catherine’s Census section, below.

In the 1880 Census, Hayesville, Susan Ryland (58) is single, not widowed, and lives with her nephew Stephen K., at home. Stephen (33) is a druggist, and his wife Rosena R (29) is keeping house with their three kids. The columns on bad health are not marked for Susan.

In the 1889-1890 Akron city directory, “Ryland, Susan Miss” resides at 219 Buckeye. Her single status and the residence match up with what we know so far, for Stephen and his family do indeed move to Akron and reside at 229 Buckeye.

She is found on page 566 in the directory, but on page 374 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Akron.1889-1899.Akron+Directory+1889-1890.374

Since Susan was close to this young family, let’s see what happened to them next.

Stephen K. Black is also listed in the 1889-1890 Akron city directory, as “Black, the druggist.” With his Aunt Susan, he and the family reside at 229 Buckeye.

His advertisement says:

Black, the Druggist (Stephen K.), manufacturer of Ak-ro-ni-an remedies, Blood Cleansers, Kidney and Liver Remedy, Ague Alleviator, Nerve Tonic, Cough Cures and Liver Pills, also dealer in drugs, medicines, toilet articles, cigars, tobaccos, Black’s Ak-ro-ni-an dyes, etc. Prescriptions carefully compounded at all hours, 102 W. Exchange cor.[ner] Main; res.[idence] 229 Buckeye, (see card, page 351, bottom stencil).

That excerpt is found on page 205 in the directory, but on page 139 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Akron.1889-1899.Akron+Directory+1889-1890.139

His advertisement on page 351 reads:

I can’t lie on my back, I can’t lie on my side, I can’t lie day or night for this distressing pain in my back. What shall I do? These and similar exclamations we hear every day. You have KIDNEY and LIVER trouble, and, unless you get relief at once your disease may become chronic, and you will be a hopeless sufferer all the days of your life.

Black’s Ak-ro-ni-an Kidney and Liver Remedy

combines the virtues of the best Diuretic known to materia medica for the relief and cure of the above diseases.

Prepared only by

Black, the Druggist

Akron, Ohio

An inset box has a drawing of a mutton-chopped, mustached man, with a slightly receding hairline.

The advertisement in the box reads:

Black’s Ak-ro-ni-an ague alleviator never fails to cure Malaria!

Black’s advertisement is found on page 351 in the directory, and page 240 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Akron.1889-1899.Akron+Directory+1889-1890.240

He also appears in the 1899 city directory, on page 204 and page 105 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Akron.1889-1899.Akron+Official+City+Directory+1899.105

The advertisement claims the same things and has the same drawing. It should be noted that Susan Ryland does not appear, so surely she died before 1899.

Stephen and his family are found in the 1900 Census, taken in Akron, Ward 3, Summit County, Ohio. S. K., working as a druggist, was born January 1847 and was 53 at his last birthday. Rozena (sic) was born in April 1851 and was 49 at her last birthday. They have been married 31 years, since 1869. Her parents are from Germany. Aunt Susan is not listed, which further indicates she died before 1900, and most likely before 1899.

In the 1910 Census, Precinct G, Akron, Stephen K. (63) and Rosina R. (58) live with their daughter Lourettie (or Lunette) Gameter (40) and her husband Emil (44), originally from Switzerland. Stephen is still a druggist. Emil is the proprietor of a tea house.

A certain Stephen K. Black died on November 6, 1911, Kent, Portage County, Ohio, but we don’t have a match in location, but the name and year of death certainly do not pose big problems for a match. As far as I can find, he does not appear in the 1920 Census. So you decide if this is the right Stephen.

But let’s not end Susan’s biography section with Stephen and his Ak-ro-ni-an miracle cures.

What are the highlights of her life? Unfortunately, the censuses do not narrow down her year of birth, ranging from 1822 to 1831. So she could be placed earlier in the birth order.

Growing up and then reaching adulthood, she was not poor. She was the daughter of a prosperous farmer, our William Ryland Sr. After he died in 1867, his will says she was to receive some money, and the 1870 Census reveals she had some assets.

It is a fact she never married. Why not? The 1870 and 1880 Censuses has categories for mental and physical handicaps, but none are marked for her. The 1880 Census says she can read and write. So she may have simply chosen not to marry, despite the social pressure on women at that time. Or maybe there were no eligible bachelors for her when she was at a marrigeable age.

Whatever the case, she and her nephew Stephen and his family must have gotten along nicely, since he lives with her and his grandparents in the 1850 and 1860 Censuses. And Susan and (our) Catherine (Ewing) Ryland live with Stephen in the 1870 Census. After Catherine died in 1874, Susan is found in Stephen’s household in the 1880 Census.

So far, I have been unable to find her year of death, although an Akron city directory lists her in the years 1889-1890, living with her nephew Stephen. Then the 1899 city directory does not list her and neither does 1900 Census, while both documents show Stephen and his family in Akron. So she died after 1890 and before 1899. Beyond these facts, her life remains a mystery.

But she certainly lived the most interesting life, perhaps more so than her siblings, with the possible exception of Mary Ann (Ryland) Black, whose son Stephen remained woven into Susan’s biography. He’s the one who gives her life its mystery, from our point of view today.

  1. William, Jr.

He is our direct ancestor. He first married Sarah Susan Baird in 1849 and moved to Missouri in fall 1857. After she died in May 1882, he moved to Kansas in March 1883, where he married Hannah Jane Vickers in December 1883. They had Floyd (Frank / Slim) Rucker Ryland (Nov. 1884) and Bessie May (Aug. 1886).

See the William Ryland and Sarah Baird post and the William Ryland and Hannah Jane post.

  1. Wilson Ryland

He was born April 2, 1830, in Richland County, Ohio. He married Hannah Jane Ling, on September 7, 1855, in Ashland County, Ohio. She was the daughter of Anthony Ling and Hannah. Hannah Jane was born on June 8, 1839 in Ohio and died on December 17, 1907. Wilson died April 24, 1905, in Hayesville, Ohio.

More about them: they had five children: Alicia M.; Dora (Leora) B.; Stephen O.; Luther E.; Lilly J.

In the 1850 Census, Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Wilson (20) lives with his parents and attended school within the year. See William and Catherine’s Census section, below.

In the 1860 Census, Vermillion, he’s 30 and a farmer; Hannah is 20, and they have two daughters Alicia (4) and Dora B. (1). Her mother Hannah lives with them and is 60. Their assets are $2500 in real estate, and $900 in their personal estate. They are neighbors of his father (our) William Sr. and younger brother David.

In the 1870 Census, Vermillion, Wilson (40) farms, and Jane’s (31) occupation is not listed. These children are part of the household: Allicia (sic) M. (14), Leora (sic) B. (11), Luther E. (8), Stephen C. (8), and Lily J. (6). So they had twin boys, like Wilson’s older brother John did (John F. and George). Wilson and Jane’s real estate is valued at $4950, while their personal estate is at $1090. Alicia and Leora attended school within the year. Finally, Wilson and his brother David are still neighbors. Their older sister Mary Ann (Ryland) Black live about five houses away.

In the 1880 Census, Wilson and Jane live in Montgomery Township, Ashland County. Wilson (50) is a farmer, Jane (41) is keeping house; their twins Luther (18) and Stephen (18) are at home, their occupations not listed, and so is Lilly (16). They must have been learning how to farm with their dad. All three attended school within the year. If we knew more about the Ling family, we might find one of her (married) sisters, if she had one, as a neighbor. But one thing is certain. They no longer reside next door to any Ryland.

Wilson (70) Riland (sic) and Jane (60) appear in the 1900 Census, Orange Township, Ashland County. It says they have been married 45 years. Their occupation is not listed, so they must have retired. Maybe they lived off their property. Luther E. (38) lives with them. He was born in April 1862. He’s a carpenter. Tragically, he was widowed.  Surely he moved back with his parents to recover from his loss and to help them in their old age. All can read and write. Wilson and Jane own their house (not farm) free of mortgage. All their parents came from Pennsylvania. But (our) Catherine (Ewing) Ryland may have been born in Maryland; she certainly resided in Bedford County, Pennsylvania.

Here is the photo of Wilson and Hannah’s gravestone:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14241053

From those images, it’s clear Wilson and Jane’s descendants honored them with high-quality gravestones.

You can find more information at this family researcher’s post, here:

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/person.aspx?pid=-1249153565&tid=6679681

  1. James Ryland

He was born July 19, 1832, in Richland County, Ohio; He was married February 22, 1855 to Catherine Shearer. He died November 27, 1873.

More about them

They had at least two children: Marcus S.; and Justin L.

In the 1850 Census James (17) lives with his parents William and Catherine Ryland. He is said to be a farmer like his dad and to have attended school within the year.

In the 1860 Census, Vermillion Township, James (27) is a farmer, and she (22) is named Catherine E. J. Their sons Marcus S. (4) and Justin L. (2) are listed. Their real property is valued at $1500, while their personal estate is at $500. Oddly another family lives with them, though they too have a real and personal estate estimate, separate from James’ and Catherine’s. Perhaps the census taker forgot to mark down the dwelling number and family number, which indicate that a family does not live with the previous one. In any case, he is named Valentine Sheriff (28) and from Germany, while his wife is Catherine (22) and also from Germany. His father Valentine Sheriff (67) also lives with them and is from Germany; their real estate is estimated to be $4800, and their personal estate is valued at $700.

On September 15, 1857, in the town of  Sturgeon, Boone County, Missouri, James Ryland’s wife Catherine E. J. Ryland purchased a lot in town for $50.00, from Jas D. Patton, A. H. Wayne, and James E. Hicks (trustees of Sturgeon Depot Company), and their wives Minerva E. Patton, Cynthia G. Wayne, and Elizabeth Hicks. The location of the property is as follows (Boone County Deed Book 30, pages 52-53):

Lot no. 1, in Block no. 53, in the town of Sturgeon “Said Lot fronting ___ [sic] feet, running back ___ [sic] feet”

Most significantly for our purposes, in the margin of the deed the clerk writes:

Taken by Wm Ryland August 15, 1860

This James Ryland is our William’s younger brother. However, as noted, James and family appear in the 1860 Census, here in Ashland County. So we have two options: James and family made the trip out to Missouri with his brothers John and William in 1857, and promptly went back to Ohio before the 1860 Census was taken; or Catherine E. J. Ryland used an agent to purchase this lot, so they did not have to come out to Missouri. Either way, William Ryland “took” it up on August 15, 1860.

  1. Catherine A. (Ryland) Reading

She was born November 20, 1835 in Akron, Summitt County, Ohio. She married May 8, 1857 to Peter Reading. He was born in August 1836. She died March 31, 1908. He most likely died between the 1910 and 1920 Censuses, in Akron. She died March 31, 1980.

More about them

It is not clear to me why it is said she was born in Akron. Her parents (our) William and Catherine Ryland were quite comfortable and stable on their farm in Vermillion Township. Recall that the History of Pioneer and Modern Times of Ashland County (1863), cited above, says: “William Ryland emigrated from Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and entered at the land-office at Canton the farm upon which he now lives, in the autumn of 1815” (emphasis added). So he didn’t move around much – or at all. Why would William and Catherine have this daughter in Akron?

In any case, daughter Catherine and her husband Peter had three children: William Louis, Adeste I., and John W.

In the 1850 Census, Vermillion Township, Peter (14) – the future husband of Catherine – lives with his father John (43), cabinet maker, from Germany, and mother Magdalene (39), also from Germany. Peter is also a cabinet maker. He has two sisters Caroline (5) and Matilda (10 months) and one brother William (3).  As for Catherine’s 1850 Census, she (15) lives with her parents (our) William and Catherine and attended school within the year.

In the 1860 Census, same township, Peter (23) Redding (sic) and his wife Catherine (25) appear. He’s a carpenter, and her occupation is not listed, though she was most likely keeping house. They have a son William L. (10 months). Their real property is valued at $400, and their personal property at $250. Catherine’s sister Sarah McKinley lives next door. A young man named Solomon Eckelberger (19) lives next door with his family, and he’s a carpenter’s apprentice. Though the Eckelbergers are not related directly to the Rylands, no doubt he and Peter worked together. Since Peter is a carpenter and not an apprentice, maybe he was training Solomon. Finally, Peter’s neighbors were farmers, and their real estate value was in the thousands. For example, Sarah and Benjamin McKinley’s farm was worth $4000, and Solomon’s father’s real estate was valued at $7000. Nonetheless, it seems Peter preferred carpentry and woodworking, though his real property was valued at $400.

In the 1870 Census, Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Peter (33) saws lumber, while Catherine (33) is busy taking care of William L. (10), Adeste I. (8), and John W. (6). Their personal estate is worth $1600, while the column in the census for their real estate is blank. Perhaps the bulk of the money is taken up in Peter’s tools. William attended school within the year. Peter’s parents are marked as having “foreign birth,” i.e. they’re from Germany. Catherine’s older brother John lives one house down (see his section, above).

The 1880 Census, Hayesville, Ashland County, says Peter (43) is a carpenter and Catharine (sic) keeps house, raising Louis (20), who’s a musician, and John (16) who’s at home. He attended school within the year. Now we know their first born son’s William’s middle name was Louis. The census says Peter’s parents were from Bavaria, though they don’t live with Peter. The family lives next to Catherine’s older brother John and his family, in Hayesville itself.

In the 1899 Akron city directory, Peter and Catherine live on 112 Crouse Street, and he’s a foreman for the “Cult. Co.” So they moved to the big city, probably for more employment opportunities. This information is found on page 560 in the directory, but on page 294 in the search engine, here:

http://content.ancestry.com/Browse/View.aspx?dbid=1540&path=Ohio.Akron.1889-1899.Akron+Official+City+Directory+1899.294

In the 1900 Census, Precinct D, Akron, Peter (63) is a wood turner, and Catherine’s (64) occupation is not cited though she was likely keeping house. They’ve been married 43 years. It says they had five children, and three are still living, though not with them. So two of their children predeceased them. It further says he was born in August 1836 and she in November 1835. His parents are from Germany, while her parents are from Maryland. We know, of course, that (our) William is from Pennsylvania, though his wife Catherine may certainly be born in Maryland. It appears Peter and Catherine have many German neighbors.

In the 1910 Census, Precinct B, Akron, Peter Reading (73) lives as a boarder with Bert W. Lacey (30) and Daisy (23), husband and wife, on Crouse Street. One researcher says Catherine died in 1908, and her absence in the 1910 census fits that date. The young couple has been married for two years, whereas Peter is widowed. Bert is a molder helper, and Peter is a pattern maker. All three can read and write, and Bert rents the house. So it seems Peter needed or wanted roommates; maybe they needed to watch out for him in his old age – but not too much since he was still gainfully employed and busy with woodworking.

To wrap up the highlights of their life, Peter’s parents were from Bavaria, and Catherine’s ancestry was also German. Her grandfather John Ryland, whom she never met, certainly spoke German and came from a Pennsylvania German community, in Berks County. Peter loved working with wood, whether a cabinet maker or a carpenter or a wood turner or in general building. Catherine’s siblings made a lot more money owning and farming land, but what’s money, when a man’s happy doing what he’s best at? If Peter was happy, then surely this made for a peaceful marriage, so we should imagine Catherine happy too.

Catherine’s death is recorded in a handwritten official list, which says she was keeping house and died of pneumonia, aged 72 years, 8 months, and 11 days. Her place of residence was 412 Crouse. Peter’s date of death is unknown, but he was recorded as active in the 1910 Census, but I can’t find him in the 1920 Census, so he probably died in that decade.

Incidentally, Peter’s father John Reading was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery (23 Mar 1807 to 31 Mar 1859) and so was his mother Magdalana (sic) Ritzheim (16 Mar 1811 to 24 May 1894). They are buried near each other in Section 2, Row 12.

  1. David Ryland

He was born December 15, 1836, in Richland County, Ohio. He was married June 4, 1857, first, to Catherine (Kate) McCarnes, in Ashland County, Ohio. Catherine was born in late December 1837 in Ohio and died on November 19, 1868, 31 years, 11 months, and 21 days. David married, second, Almira (Elmyra) J. Shenberger (daughter of Joseph Shenberger and Margaret), who was born December 1846 in Ohio and died March 2, 1930, in Ashland County, and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery. David died March 9, 1923 in Ashland County and was buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, on March 11.

Go here for the marriage date of David and Kate:

http://www.ashlandohio.pa-roots.com/MAR-MZ.html

More about them: According to one researcher, David and Catherine had five children: Ziralla or Derelda; Emmer; Franklin M.; Mary F; Lucille Emma. Then David and Almira had four children: Grace I.; Earl O. (D.); David E.; Gloyd W. (d. 1912).

In the 1850 Census, Vermillion Township, David (14) lives with his father (our) William and Catherine Ryland. He attended school within the year.

In the 1860 Census, Vermillion Township, David (23) is married to Catherine whose nickname Kate (22) appears. He’s a farmer, and her occupation is not cited, though she was most likely keeping house. They have a daughter Ziralla (2) and a boy Lucius E. (8 mos.). (Is Lucius Lucille, or did he die early?) They live next door to David’s father (our) William and brother Wilson. David’s property is valued at $2000, and his personal estate is at $850.

The 1870 Census, same township, shows David (33), a farmer, without his wife Catherine (Kate), for she died in 1868. But he does live with his mother-in-law Mary Carn (66) and these children: Derelda (12), Emma L. (10), Franklin M. (6), and May F. (3). No doubt Kate’s passing created a lot of sadness in the family, especially in the children. David’s land is worth $5220, and his personal property is valued at $650. Derelda and Emma attended school within the year.

In the 1880 Census, David (43) lives in the same township. He has remarried, to Elmira (33), who is keeping house. He’s a farmer. Emmer (20), who works on the farm; Frank (16) at home; Mary (14) at home; Grace (5); and David E. (three months and b. Feb) round out the happy family. May’s name “shifted” to Mary from the previous census to this one. All the kids except little David attended school within the year. Elmira’s father’s from Pennsylvania, and her mother’s from Maryland.

It’s the 1900 Census that reveals more than the others so far. David (63) lives in Hayesville Township, Ashland County, was born in December 1836, was a farmer who could read and write, and owned a farm free of mortgage. His wife Almira (sic) is 53 and born in December 1846. The census taker says they’ve been married 33 years, but this is miscalculated. Grace I. or J. (24), single, was born in June 1875, and was a millner. She’s been unemployed for four months. Their youngest son’s name is said to be Gloid W. (17), single, who was born in May 1882. He’s a farm laborer. Everyone can read and write.

The 1910 Census, Vermillion Township, says David (63) has his “own income” for an occupation. Elmyra J. (53) is the mother of 4 children, who are still living. She and David are said to be married for 39 years. These kids live with them: Earl D. (30), a farmer; Minnie (34) is the daughter-in-law, so Earl and she are married, and the census says for 10 years; Elma E. (9) is recorded as the stepdaughter; and Grace P. (3) is also said to be the stepdaughter, but this is a census error. Surely they’re children and grandchildren. David owns the farm free of mortgage. Incidentally, Earl D. (1880-1964) and Mina (1875-1917) are buried in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, she in Section 1, Row 13, he in Lot 17.

In the 1920 Census, David (83) rents a house in Hayesville, on East Street. He can read and write, but has no occupation, meaning he’s retired. Almira (73) can read and write, and neither does she have an occupation. They moved into town and no longer have any kids living with them.

Let’s wrap up David’s life. He and his wife Kate had five kids. Then she died, tragically, in 1868. The 1870 Census says he’s a widower, and their youngest daughter Mary (May) is 3 years young. Fortunately, David’s mother-in-law Mary lived with him, so she comforted him and her grandkids during this difficult time. It must have been very sad for her as well.

David remarried, perhaps not long after Kate died. His second wife was Almira (Elmyra) J. Shenberger. He and his new wife had four more children. David lived in Vermillion and Hayesville, Ashland County, Ohio, all of his life – so for him there was no long journeys to the frontiers only to come back, as his older brother John did or to stay as his older brother (our) William did. There’s something to be said for both life choices.

Here is a look at David’s family, posted by a researcher:

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/person.aspx?pid=-1645276341&tid=4158367

Here is David’s grave marker, Vermillion Cemetery, Hayesville, Ashland County:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024458

Here is Almira’s grave marker,

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024459

Here is Gloyd W’s grave marker: (1882-1912)

https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024457

Grace’s grave marker (1875-1945):

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024460&

Earl and Mina’s grave marker:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=24024454

More information on these Rylands

As to the Rylands generally, this webpage transcribes gravestone inscriptions:

http://boards.ancestry.co.uk/surnames.ryland/222/mb.ashx

And this one covers many cemeteries in Ashland County:

http://www.geocities.com/ashland-oh/files.htm

Go to Find a Grave, http://www.findagrave.com/, click on millions of grave records, type in Ryland (without first or middle names), and click on Ohio. You’ll discover the life span of many of the folks in this list of William and Catherine’s children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

WILLIAM AND CATHERINE’S CENSUS RECORDS

1820

William Ryland moved to Ohio, in autumn 1815. He finished administering his deceased father John’s estate by April 1815, when the Court approved of William’s accounting. After that time, he was free to move, and move he did. Not shown in this table, George Ewing, William’s (Billy’s) brother-in-law and Catherine’s brother, lived nearby in the census. It is not clear why a white male and white female are marked as being between 16 and 18 and 16 and 25, respectively. Later, William Jr. per the censuses will hire farm hands, so maybe William Sr. did the same. Or perhaps relatives of Catherine (Ewing) Ryland were living with them.

 

1820 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Richland County, Ohio

Head of Family Free White Males Free White Females
Under 10 16-18 26-44 Under 10 16-25 +45
William Riland 1 1 1 1 1 1
Page 219; the 1820 Census has a few more age categories, but only the relevant ages have been kept in this Table.

1830

It’s a mystery why William does not appear in the census. His brother-in-law George Ewing does, however. Next to him is a William Kelly. Did the census-taker mean “Reilly”? Recall that the History of Pioneer and Modern Times of Ashland County (1863), cited above, says: “William Ryland emigrated from Bedford County, Pennsylvania, and entered at the land-office at Canton the farm upon which he now lives, in the autumn of 1815” (emphasis added). So he didn’t move around much – or at all. So it’s just a census-taker’s oversight

1840

Not shown in this table, George Ewing lived next door.

 

1840 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Richland County, Ohio

Names of Heads of Families Free White Males Free White Females
Under 5 5-9 10-14 50-59 5-9 15-19 40-49
Wm. Ryland 1 2 2 1 1 1 1
Total 9
In the 1840 Census, the ages of the free persons go up by fives and tens, to a hundred years old. Only the relevant ages have been included in this Census Table. No slaves are marked. Employed in Agriculture is marked as 1.

1850

Not included in this Table, George Ewing (Catherine’s brother) lived in dwelling no. 249 and is family no. 257; his origin is marked as Maryland, and he is 60 yrs. old. (Others listed: Mary 58; William 24 or 21, farmer; George 19, student; James 31 (?), farmer) (see the John Ewing post). There is strong evidence that Catherine (Ewing) Ryland comes from Maryland, not Pennsylvania, despite what the 1850 Census says (censuses are often inaccurate). Stephen C. [sic] Black is William and Catherine’s grandson, by their firstborn Mary Ann. He signs his middle initial with a K, and the probate records confirm it. I don’t know where his mother is (see the 1870 Census, below, for more discussion).

 

1850 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio

Names Age Sex Occupation Value: Real, Personal POB Married Within  Year Attend School Within Year
William Ryland 62 M Farmer 8,960 Pennsylvania
Catherine 57 F
Willson [sic] 20 M Ohio Yes
James 17 M Yes
David 14 M Yes
Susannah 24 F
Catherine 15 F Yes
Stephen C. [sic] Black 9 M
Dwelling no. in order of visitation: 250; family no. in order of visitation: 258; enumerated the 14th day of September. This census taker leaves “Color” blank. No slaves are marked for either farm.

1850

I thought I should include William Ryland Jr’s 1850 Census here. Junior (Frank Ryland’s father) lived next to Senior before Junior moved to Missouri and then to Kansas (see William Jr’s posts here and here). So Junior and Senior had neighboring farms. Recall that Sarah is not Frank’s mother. Sarah died in Missouri May 17, 1882; then William came out to Kansas and married Hannah Jane Vickers, Frank’s mother, on December 4, 1883.

 

1850 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio

Names Age Sex Occupation Value: Real, Personal POB Married Within  Year Attend School Within Year
William Ryland 22 M Farmer 1,500 OH Yes
Sarah 18 F Yes
Arminda 7/12 F
John Richabaugh 11 M Yes
Dwelling no. in order of visitation: 251; family no. in order of visitation: 257; enumerated the 14th day of September.  No slaves are marked for either farm, and the census taker left “Color” blank.

1860

Not shown in this table, David Ryland (one of Wm. Ryland Sr.’s son) lives in dwelling no. 943 and is family no. 978; Wilson Ryland (one of Wm. Ryland Sr.’s son) has dwelling no. 944 and is family no. 979; apparently they have neighboring farms. Stephen Black is still living with his grandparents and Aunt Susan. George Ewing, not shown in this table, still lives next door, but his son William Ewing has taken leadership of the farm.

 

1860 Census of the United States

Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio

Post Office: Hayesville

Names Age Sex Occupation Value: Real,

Personal

POB Ed; Married within year
William Ryland 72 M Farmer 9,000

1,200

Pennsylvania
Catherine 66 F
Susan 29 [sic] O[H]
Steven Black 14 M Attend school
Page 140 (or 160); Dwelling no. in order of visitation: 942; Family no. in order of visitation: 977; enumerated 2 day of August 1860. This census taker leaves “Color” blank, and not every category is filled in. Note:

 

Since George Ewing and his wife Mary were neighbors and close relations of William and Catherine (Ewing) Ryland, let’s finish out their lives. George died December 13, 1867, 78 years, 3 months, and 6 days old (not too many months after his brother-in-law [our] William died). Mary had died earlier, on April 19, 1854, 62 years and 21 (or 24) days old. That’s why George appears without her in the 1860 Census. George and Mary are buried next to each other in Hayesville-Vermillion Cemetery, Old Section, Part 2, Row 9.

1870

Stephen and his family and his grandmother and now great-grandmother Catherine, and his aunt and now great-aunt Susan live in town. Their neighbors have the occupation of shoemaker, grocer, grocer, and (worker in a) “foundery”; Stephen is a druggist or pharmacist. The farm life was not for him. Next, Susan (Catherine’s daughter) owns some real estate and has some valuable personal property. It may not come entirely from her father’s estate (he died in 1867), for the will states she shall get $900 after her mother Catherine dies (in 1874).

 

1870 Census of the United States

Hayesville Vermillion Township, Ashland County, Ohio

Post Office: Ashland, Ohio

Names Age Sex Color Occupation Value: Real, Personal Origins
Black, Stephen 23 M W Druggist 3,100 (Personal) Ohio
— Rosina 18 F W
— Lunette 7/12 F W Born within yr, Nov. (?)
Ryland, Catherine 74 F W Maryland
— Susan 40 F W 2,000 (real); 500 (pers) Ohio
Names (cont.) Education Male, US Citizen +21
Black, Stephen Yes
— Rosina
— Lunette
Ryland, Catherine
— Susan
The Census does not mark every category. Dwelling no. in order of visitation: 68; family no. in order of visitation: 66. The need to know who in the household is male and over 21 and a citizen is to figure out the eligible voters.

 

WILLIAM AND CATHERINE’S DEEDS

Deeds are about land transactions, buying and selling. All records here are about Richland (and later) Ashland Counties, Ohio. They are abstracts. The transactions of most interest to our family are as follows, by date: June 17, 1814; December 20, 1850; and April 3, 1855.

Ashland Co Farm, 1874

This charming drawing presents a good idea of what more prosperous farms looked like back then.

Vermillion Township Map

Vermillion Twp Sec 22

Ryland Land S 22 T 21

Look for the Rylands and Ewings. They owned land in several places.

June 17, 1814

John Ewing [William’s father-in-law] of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, sells 160 acres to William Ryland, assignee, Section 22, NW ¼, for $315.87, patented July 10, 1818.

June 17, 1814

John Ewing of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, sells land 160 acres to George Ewing [William’s brother-in-law], assignee, Section 22, NW 1/4 160 acres, for $231.32, patented September 2, 1824.

February 28, 1827

James Denney of Richland County Ohio, assignee John Galloway, Section 34, SE ¼, March 28, 1816, 160 acres, $230.00, Patented April 2, 1831. “Tract book indicates the W ½ SE ¼ was originally purchased on 29 Apr 1826, by William RYLAND, Richland Co Ohio. A notation in the book states that this lot was erroneously entered and patented, that the patent was canceled and filed and the purchase money ordered to be refunded.”

November 10, 1831

USA patents land to William Ryland, Section 34, W ½, SW ¼, 80 acres, for $100.00 (Record 5-115, see 11-219).

May 25, 1833

Stephen Smith no wife named to William Ryland, Quit Claim, $200.00, Section 33, NW ¼, water privileges, Nov. 22, 1833 (10-426).

November 23, 1833

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 70 acres, Section 33, NW corner W ½, SW ¼ to W & R Smith, for $100.00 (11-218).

November 23, 1833

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 10 acres, Section 33, NW corner W ½ SW ¼ to Robert Carpenter, for $50.00 (11-219).

November 26, 1845

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 3 acres to Benjamin Bowers, Section 22, part SE 1/4, for $75.00 (29-330).

April 3, 1855

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 3 acres (no section given) SE ¼, to Daniel Harmon, for $86.00 (12-53). But it’s listed under Section 22.

May 6, 1848

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 1 acre, Section 33, part of lot purchased from Stephen Smith, to Jonathan S. Black, for $20.00 (9-217).

December 20, 1850

 William Ryland and wife Catherine sell 69 acres, Section 22, SW ¼ SW corner ¼ to William Ryland Jr, for $1700.00 (12-51). William Jr. is shown in the 1850 Census as a neighbor to William Sr.

William Ryland Jr. is son of William and Catherine Ryland. William Jr. was the father of Floyd (Frank / Slim) and his sister Bessie May by his second marriage. But first he is married to Sarah Baird here in Ohio.

April 3, 1855

William Ryland Jr. and wife Sarah sell 69 acres, Section 22, part SW ¼, to David Harmon, for $2100.00 (12-51 & 52).

Recall that William Jr. and Sarah Ryland move to Boone County, Missouri in fall 1857, so with this land sale, the way is cleared to depart. It looks like he made a profit (see Dec. 20, 1850, above). See the William and Sarah Ryland post for a transcription.

Jonathan S. Black is William’s and Catherine’s son-in-law, for he married Mary Ann Ryland, their first child.

July 7, 1837

J. S. Black & Iathers sell 130 acres, Section 35, SE ¼, for $2200.00 to Andrew Mumper, December 22, 1837 (17-406).

June 12, 1845

James B. Smith, no wife named, sells 9 acres, Section 33, part NW corner of ¼, to Jonathan S. Black, for $225.00 (9-215).

April 1848

Jonathan S. Black and wife Mary sell land (no acreage given), Section 16, SW ¼, part SW ¼, for $450.00 to Robert Cowan, June 7, 1848 (2-452)

May 6, 1848

Jonathan S. Black and wife Mary R. [sic] sell 10 acres, Section 33, part NW ¼ to Reuben H. Davis, for $225.00 (9-216).

May 6, 1848

William Ryland and wife Catherine sell to Jonathan S. Black 1 acre, Section 33, NW ¼, for $20.00, part of lot purchased of Stephen Smith, January 11, 1854 (9-217)

Source: Ashland County, Ohio, Research Aid #10: Vermillion Township. Ashland County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society, 1999 (P. O. Box 681, Ashland Ohio, 44805-0681)

November 10, 1831

Richland County. Sample deed. The italics font indicates the handwritten, filled-in blanks, in this preprinted form.

The United States of America

To all whom these presents shall come, Greeting:

Whereas, William Ryland, of Richland County, Ohio, has deposited in the General Land Office of the United States, a certificate of the Register of the Land Office at Wooster whereby it appears that full payment has been made by the said William Ryland, according to the provisions of the act of Congress of the 24th of April, 1820, entitled “An act making further provision for the sale of the Public Lands,” for the West half of the South West quarter of section thirty-four, in Township twenty-one, of Range sixteen, in the district of Lands subject to sale at Wooster, Ohio, containing eighty acres,

According to the official plat of the said Lands, returned to the General Land Office by the Surveyor General, which said tract has been purchased by the said William Ryland

Now Know Ye that the United States of America in consideration of the premises, and in conformity with the ___ acts of Congress, in such case made and provided, have given and granted, and, by these presents, do give and grant, unto the said William Ryland and to his heirs the said tract of above described: To Have and to Hold the same, together with all the rights, privileges, immunities and appurtenances, of whatever nature thereto belonging, unto the said William Ryland and to his heirs and assigns forever.

In testimony whereof, I, Andrew Jackson, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, have caused the Letters to be made Patent, and the Seal of the General Land Office to be hereunto affixed.

Given under my hand, at the City of Washington, the tenth of November in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one and of the Independence of the United States ___  fifty sixth

Signed May 1, 1833

By the President Andrew Jackson

By N. [?] Q. Danielson

E. H. Commissioner of the General Land Office.

Transcription ends.

Vermillion Township, Ashland County, 1861.  William Ryland’s property appears below Section 22.

Source: http://ashlandohiogenealogy.org/mappdfopen.html

Agricultural Production

1850 Ag Production Wm Ryland

All the key names are there, at the top: George Ewing is Catherine’s brother and William Sr.’s brother-in-law; William Ryland Sr. has 200 acres; young William Ryland Jr. is there (our direct line), farming a mere fifty acres as his “practice” farm before he moves to Missouri. John Ryland, the oldest son, is also learning how to farm with 65 acres before he joins William in Missouri.

TAX LISTS

 

1819-1825 Tax List, Vermillion Township

Name Sec. Descr. Ac. 1819 1820 1821 1822 1823 1824 1825
William Ryland 22 SE 160 R R R R R
William Ryland 22 SW 160 R R R R R
Tax list says John Ewing was the original owner. R = Resident Owner

 

1826-1831 Tax List, Vermillion Township

Name Sec. Descr. Ac. 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830 1831
William Ryland 22 S ½ 320 X X X X X X
William Ryland 33 Pt SW ¼ 51 X
X = he is on the list.

 

1826-1834 Tax List, Vermillion Township

Name 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830 1831 1832 1833 1834
H C H C H C H C H C H C H C H C H C
Wm Ry-land 2 5 3 3 3 4 3 7 3 8 2 8 2 9 3 9 4 9
H = Mules, asses, horses; C = Cattle; Jonathan Black shows up in the 1833 Tax list, owning 1 “H”

 

1832-1838 Tax List, Vermillion Township

Name Sec Desc Ac 1832 1833 1834 1835 1836 1837 1838
Ryland Wm 22 S ½ 320 X X X X X
Same Saw Mill X
Same House X
Ryland Wm 33 Pt NW 51 X X X X
Same Saw Mill X
X = He is on the list. Jonathan S. Black appears in the years 1836 and 1837, Sec. 35 W ½ SE 80 acres

Source: Ashland County, Ohio, Research Aid #10, Vermillion Township, Ashland County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society, 1999.

WILLIAM RYLAND AND LOCAL POLITICS

April 1841

He was elected trustee of Ashland County.

April 1842

He was elected trustee of Ashland County.

April 1843

He was elected trustee of Ashland County.

April 1844

He was elected trustee of Ashland County.

Source: H. S. Knapp, A History of the Former and Modern Times of Ashland County, Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1863, p. 267.

WILLIAM RYLAND’S PROBATE RECORDS

February 23, 1866 (will was originally written) and May 8, 1867 (will was filed).

In this document, Catherine’s name is careted in, and then the recorder or notary later calls her Elizabeth. (Such errors are common in early documents.) It is possible that Catherine’s middle name was Elizabeth. Next, James Ewing is appointed executor. Catherine has a brother named James, but he died in 1875, and the final accounting was not confirmed by the court until 1876, with James still the executor. So who was James? Recall that George, Catherine’s brother, had a son of that name. See the 1850 Census, above, and the Final Account, below, for more about James. In any case, in Article Four, note that the sons are named first, while the daughters are second.

A transcript follows the original.

Wm Will 2

 

Wm Will 3

 

Wm Will 4

Note William Ryland’s Unusual Mark.

Transcription begins:

Last Will & Testament

of

Wm. Ryland De’d.

2010

Filed May 8, 1867

Recorded on page 416

vol 2.

In the name of the Benevolent Father of all.  I Wm Ryland Snr. of the County of Ashland and State of Ohio do make make [sic] and publish this my last will and Testament

Art 1 It is my will that after my death that [sic] all my Just debts Shall be paid and a Suitible [sic] Tomb stone erected at the head of My Grave

Art 2 I will and Bequeath to my Beloved Wife [careted in:] /Catharine/ [sic] at my death all the Real and personal property that I may have during her lifetime

Art 3

At the death of my Beloved Wife Catherine I wish to have all the Real and personal property that Belongs to my Estate Sold by My Executor herin [sic] after named and divided Among my Children as Follows as named Below

Art 4

It is my will That John Ryland Shall have Five Hundred dollars

That Livi [sic] Ryland is to have Two Hundred dollars

That Wm Ryland is to have Three Hundred dollars

That Wilson Ryland is to have Six Hundred dollars

That David Ryland is to have Five Hundred dollars

That James Ryland is to have Ten dollars this Being the full Amount Coming to him from my Estate

That Mary Ann Black is to have Two Hundred dollars

That Elizabeth Black is to have Four Hundred dollars

That Susan Ryland is to have Nine Hundred dollars

That Sarah McKinley is to have Three Hundred dollars

That Catherine Reading is to have Six Hundred dollars

That my Grand [careted in:] /Son/ Stephen Black is to have Six Hundred Dollars

Art 5

Now after the above dividing[s] are made the Balance of my Estate I want Equally divided among my Children above name Excepting James Ryland as the full Amount Coming to him of my Estate is mentioned Above

Art 6

It is my will that my wife Elizabeth [sic] ocupy [sic] the dwelling House on the farm we now liv[e] on as Long as she lives and after her death it is my will that my Executor Shall pay her Funeral Expenses and Erect a Suitable Tombstone at the head of her grave

I also Constitute and apoint [sic] James Ewing of the County of Ashland and State of Ohio my Executor of this my Last Will and Testament

In Testimony whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this 23’d day of Februrary [sic] A D 1866

William (X) Ryland Snr. [seal]

We the undersigned was [sic] present at the Signing of this his last will and Saw him Sign the Same and we have Signed the Same in his presance [sic]

Witness

William Ewing

D K Hull

Transcription ends.

May 8, 1867

This document says that the signers of William Ryland’s will testify that it is valid. However, D. K. Hull, one of the original signers, is deceased by May 8, 1867. So the next document will smooth out that legal wrinkle. The italics font indicates that the name or words were handwritten in the blanks of this preprinted form. I don’t know who William Ewing was, unless he was Catherine’s brother. He died in 1870, so he could have signed this will (see the John Ewing post).

The State of Ohio

Ashland County, ss

Personally appeared in open Court Wm Ewing subscribing witness to the Last Will and Testament Wm. Ryland late of said County, deceased, who being duly sworn according to law deposes and says that the foregoing is the Last Will and Testament of said Wm Ryland, deceased, that [written in:] he subscribed [written in:] his name thereto, as attesting Witness, at the request of the said Testator, and in his presence, and in the presence of [written in:] DK Hull, now deac’d, and that he signed the same in our presence, and acknowledged the same to be his Last Will and Testament; that said Testator at the time of executing the same was of full age, sound mind and memory, and not under any restraint.

[signed] William Ewing

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court, this 8th day of May AD 1867

[signed] T C Bushnell, Probate Judge

Transcription ends.

May 8, 1867

This document says that the Probate Judge needs witnesses to testify that D. K. Hull, deceased, signed William Ryland’s Will, back in 1866. All of this document is handwritten.

The State of Ohio

Ashland Co, ss

Personally appeared before me in Open Court Wilson Ryland & Stephen Black, who being duly sworn according to law, depose & say that they are well acquainted with the handwriting of D. K. Hull now deceased, and that they have examined the signature attached to [crossed out:] /the/ what purports to be the Last Will & Testament of Wm Ryland dec’d., and are fully satisfied that the name of D. K. Hull thereon written, was written by himself, that it is his hand writing & that the said D. K. Hull dec’d 11 March & further deponents saith not

Wilson Ryland

S. K. Black

Sworn to & subscribed before me this 8th May A D 1867

T C Bushnell

Probate Judge

Transcription ends.

September 14, 1867

This document says that the Probate Judge appoints three men to take an inventory and appraisal of William Ryland’s property, goods and chattels. The italics font indicates that the names or words were written in the blanks of this preprinted form.

The State of Ohio

Ashland County, SS

To Wm Ewing, Wm Strickland, John Lang, Greeting:

You have been appointed by the Probate Court of said County, to take an Inventory and Appraisal of the personal goods and chattels of the Estate of William Ryland, late of the township of [blank] in said County, deceased.

These are, therefore, to authorize and require you well and truly to appraise all the goods and chattels of the deceased, which shall be presented to you by the administrators, and a true and accurate inventory thereof, and perform all other duties required by law of you in the premises, as appraisers, &c., and make and sign, that the same may be returned to this office within three months from the date hereof.

Witness, J C Bushnell, Judge of Probate Court, at Ashland, this 14th say of September AD one thousand eight hundred and sixty seven

T C Bushnell, Probate Judge

September 26 [?], 1867

Transcription ends.

September 26, 1867

This document shows the three appraisers have been sworn in, to do their duty in taking an inventory and valuing William Ryland’s property, goods, and chattels. The italics font indicates that the names or words were written in the blanks of this preprinted form.

The State of Ohio

Ashland County, SS

We, the undersigned, do make solemn oath, that will truly, honestly, and impartially appraise the estate and property that may be exhibited to us, belonging to the estate of William Ryland, deceased; and perform the other duties required by law of us in the premises, as appraisers, &c., according to the best of our knowledge and ability.

William Ewing

Wm S Strickland

John [?] Lang

Sworn and subscribed before me this the 26 [?] day of September, AD 1867

[Illegible signature]

Transcription ends.

October 14, 1867

This series of documents belongs to the Inventory and Appraisement of William Ryland’s estate. It seems that by now the law allows the widow to keep some of the property, instead of it all being sold. Earlier inventories indicate that all of it was sold, leaving the widow with very little, if anything at all. As usual, italics font indicates that the names and words were written in the blanks of these preprinted forms. Schedule A’s items are handwritten, of course.

We, the undersigned, appraisers of the estate and property of [blank], deceased, after being duly sworn, have made an inventory and appraisement thereof, as hereinafter set forth.

 

SCHEDULE A

Personal Goods and Chattels belonging to the estate of the said Wm Ryland, deceased, which are assets, and in the hands of the Administrator, as shown to us.
No. of items Appraised Value
1 Settee 3 00
1 Table 3 00
1 Large Rocking Chair 2 00
3 Chairs 2 25
2 Chairs 50
1 Bureau 4 00
1 Chest 2 00
1 Book Case 2 00
1 Table 2 00
1 Bureau 2 00
1 Dough Tray 25
1 Table 1 00
1 Whealborow [sic] 2 00
The undivided ½ of a Sl[  ]gh 5 00
Brout [sic] over 31 00
1 Wood Saw Mall & Iron Wedge 1 00
1 Bard and meet [sic] block 50
1 Box Stove 5 00
1 Churn 25
1 Kitchen Cupboard 50
1 Iron Pot 25
1 Large C[op]per Kettel [sic] 10 00
1 Iron Kettel [sic] 50
1 windmill & large hogshead 2 00
1 Set of double Harness 30 00
2 Pitchforks 50
1 Single Harness 1 00
1 Two Horse Wagon 125 00
1 Lot of hay 4.00 per tun [sic] Blank
1 old wagon 10 00
The undivided ¼ part of [mo]wer & Reaper 30 00
1 Croscut [sic] Saw 1 00
1 old Top Bugy [sic] 15 00
½ of one Harow [sic] 3 50
1 Log Chain 2 00
1 Stack of Hay 9 00
The undivided ½ half of two acres of Corn 8 00
90 Bushels of oats 45 Cents per Bushel 40 60
7 Head of hogs 28 00
½ of one Dinner bell 2 00
356 50

 

SCHEDULE B

The following are the Debts, &c., due said Estate:
Name of Debtor Description of Debt Date Principal Interest Amount Due Appr. Value
John Ryland One note Jan 21 1867 50 00 1 93 48 30 48 30
Credit on same Aug 1 1867 3 63
Wilson Ryland Seven note Jan 20 1866 1422 79 134 40 1469 58 1468 58
Credit on first note Jan 11 67 87 61
David Ryland Five notes Jan 20 1866 1000 00 92 34 1034 34 1034 34
Credit on first note Jan 20 67 54 00
Wm Ryland One Note Jan 1 1861 500 99 Balance due 206 92
Seal 2759 14

 

SCHEDULE C

Amount of Money in the Hands of the Administrator, belonging to said Estate
$ 61 73

 

SCHEDULE D

The Said Wm Ryland, deceased, leaving a family, the following articles are not deemed assets, to be administered upon as such, but left with the family without being appraised,

to wit:

Beds Beding [sic] and Bedsteds for the family
One cow
10 Sheep being all their [sic] was

 

SCHEDULE E

The said decedent, leaving a wife, we do allow for their support, for one year from the death of the decedent, the following property, to wit:
The Sum of 400 00
50 Bushels of wheat 100 00
175 Bushels of oats 78 75
35 Bushels of Corn 35 00
1 Tun [sic] of Hay 11 00
To be paid the widow by the Administrator for cash, on her allowance in cash 60 00
Balance 122 25
$400 00

 

SCHEDULE G

The said decedent, leaving a widow, we set off to her the following personal property, not exceeding One Hundred Dollars in value, by said Widow, selected under and by virtue of the provisions of the Statute in that behalf made and provided
1 Cow 35 00
6 Head of Hogs 15 00
2 Acres of corn 33 00
a Lot of hay 14 00
100 00

The State of Ohio

Ashland County, ss

Before the subscriber, Judge of the Probate Court, within and for said County on the 14th day of October AD 1867, personally appeared James Ewing Executor of [crossed out: Stephen Ewing] Wm Ryland, late of said County, deceased, and being duly qualified ____ he ____ did depose and say, that the foregoing inventory, &c. is in all respects just and true, that it contains a true statement of all the Estate and property of the said deceased, which has come to the knowledge of the said affiant being assets &c., and particularly of all moneys, bank bills and other circulating medium, belonging to the deceased, and of all just claims of the said deceased, against … he … said affiant and all other persons, according to the best of his knowledge and belief.

Sworn to and subscribed before me, James Ewing

the day and year above written

J C Bushnell, Probate Judge

Transcription ends.

March 1, 1876 to May 1, 1876

James Ewing, executor of William Ryland’s estate, filed his accounting on March 31, 1876; the hearing was held on May 1 1876, and the account was allowed and confirmed on May 1, 1876. The parts I like the most are the medical bill and burial arrangements, at the bottom of the first page and beginning of the second. The tombstone, coffin, burial clothes, and medical bill were expensive, if you compare them to the prices in the Inventory and Appraisement, above. The price of the tombstone was high indeed ($70.00). Evidently, the family wanted their husband and father to be buried honorably. This indicates their prosperity and love for him. Mary Ann (Dally) Ryland took care of her father-in-law during his illness and got paid for it.

Who was James Ewing? Catherine’s nephew, not her brother. Eleanor (Ewing) Swineford adds this family tradition about him in correspondence with me:

After reading your information I think that James Ewing who you are referring to was James Ewing the son of George and Mary Ewing. He never married as he was born a cripple and did a lot of legal work for the Ewing family. A descendant of George has a diary that an old maid kept and in it she referred to James who had some knowledge of legal work and did this for a living in the Hayesville community. James died in 1902. This is more than likely the James that has his name on many records. Just a thought.

 

Final account of James Ewing as executor of William Ryland deceased.

1870
Nov. 1st 1870 Said executor of are said charges himself as follows:
“ “ Bal. in hands of executor at settlement 4775 30
Apl. 11th 1873 Rec’d of Wm Ryland on notes including int 1017 15
June 15 / 74 ” ” David Ryland ” ” “ 505 34
Int on last two items 160 00
Interest on $4775.30 1122 19
Bal over paid by executor 18 81
7598 79
Said executor asks credit as follows:
Nov 16 / 71 Paid taxes of 1871 1st install. voucher 1 25 75
June 18 / 71 ” d[itt]o do 2d do ” 2 23 25
Dec 8 / 75 ” do 1875 “ 3 25 92
June 19 / 71 ” do 1870 2d install. “ 4 27 75
Nov 29 / 70 ” do 1870 1st  do “ 5 32 75
Dec 4 / 74 ” do 1874 1st do “ 6 25 75
Dec 17 / 73 ” do 1873 1st  do “ 7 30 25
May 22/ 74 ” do 1873 2d do “ 8 25 25
June 16 / 75 ” do 1874 2d do “ 9 23 25
June 12 / 73 ” do 1872 ½ do “ 10 22 50
Nov 27 / 72 ” Taxes on chattel “ 11 25 50
Feb. 26 / 76 ” Sucus [sic] & Onstott acct for Funeral “ 12 87
” 19 / 75 ” T.C. Harvey burial clothes “ 13 7 00
Oct 3 / 74 ” U Ambrosi diging [sic] Grave “ 14 1 50
Apl 21 / 75 ” E.V. Kendig medical bill “ 15 7 25
Over 304 54
[New Page]
amount Brought over 304 54
1875
Sept 2 / 75 Pd P. Q. Stiner for tomb stones V 16 70 00
Dec. 23 / 74 ” Daniel Youngling for coffin “ 17 25 00
Jan 25 / 75 ” Mary A. Ryland attendance in sickness “ 18 10 75
1872 ” S Eckelberger road work “ 19 2 50
Oct 10 / 72 Note to Levi Ryland “ 20 14 65
Feb 20 1872 Catharine Ryland widow of dec’d interest per will “ 21 40 00
Apl 13 / 74 ” do ” do do “ “ 22 75 00
Feb 5 / 74 ” do ” do do “ “ 23 70 00
Aug 16 / 71 ” do ” do do “ “ 24 105 00
Dec 19 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 25 50 00
July 4 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 26 40 00
Feb 12 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 27 30 00
Oct 13 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 28 40 00
May 11 / 72 ” do ” do do “ “ 29 35 00
Oct 11 / 72 ” do ” do do “ “ 30 30 00
Apl 10 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 31 40 00
Aug 10 / 74 ” do ” do do “ “ 32 35 00
Sept 9 / 73 ” do ” do do “ “ 33 70 00
Dec 3 / 72 ” do ” do do “ “ 34 30 00
July 1 / 74 ” do ” do do “ “ 35 60 00
Aug 1 / 72 ” do ” do do “ “ 36 90 00
Sept 28 / 74 ” do ” do do “ “ 37 25 00
Nov 17 / 71 ” do ” do do “ “ 38 60 00
1870 Dec 2

1870 March 2

” do ” do do “ “ 39 110 00
Nov 19 / 72 ” do ” do do “ “ 40 30 00
” Commission on $2804.68 at 2 prct. Do “ 40 ½ 56 09
Carried over 1548 03
[New Page]
Amount brought down 1548 03
1875 June 2d Paid Sarah L. Lutz daught of Levi Ryland by will V 41 50 00
Feb 1870 ” do do do do “ 42 8 67
“ 22 / 76 ” Paul Oliver guardian of Children of Levy [sic] Ryland “ 43 176 01
Jan 2 1875 ” Wilson Ryland son of Levi Ryland per will “ 44 58 67
June 14 / 75 ” Lydia Ryland widow of Levi Ryland on [distrivtur?] “ 45 146 66
Dec 24 / 74 ” Elizabeth Black on devises “ 46 200 00
Dec 24 / 74 ” Susan Ryland do “ 47 450 00
“ “ ” S. K. Black do “ 48 300 00
Dec 30 / 74 ” Sarah M C Kinley do “ 49 150 00
“ 23 / 74 ” Mary A. Black do “ 50 200 00
“ 25 / 74 ” Catharine Reding [sic] do “ 51 300 00
Nov 21 / 74 Wm Ryland do “ 52 140 00
Dec 27 / 74 ” David Ryland           do “ 53 250 00
Feb 12 / 76 ” Mary A. Black do “ 54 340 00
Dec 27 / ” John Ryland do “ 55 250 00
Feb 14 / 76 ” Susan Ryland           do “ 56 340 00
“ “ “ ” Sarah M C Kinley do “ 57 340 00
Feb 12 / 76 ” Jno. Ryland do “ 58 340 00
“ 21 / 76 ” Elizabeth Black do “ 59 340 00
“ 14 / 76 ” Catharine Redding [sic] do “ 60 340 00
Jan 24 / 76 Wm Ryland do “ 61 340 00
Feb 15 / 76 ” Wilson Ryland do “ 62 340 00
“ 10 / 76 ” David Ryland do “ 62 340 00
Dec 30 / 74 ” Wilson Ryland do “ 64 300 00
March 31 /  76 ” Judge Taylor fees on this acct 4 75
“ “ / 76 ” M Combs & Curtis fees 6 00
7598 79

State of Ohio

Ashland County ss

James Ewing executor of the last will & Testament of William Ryland deceased makes oath that the within accout [sic] is correct according to the best of his knowledge &

belief of the said Estate.

James Ewing

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 31st day of March 1876.

S L Arnold

Notary Public

Final account of

James Ewing as

executor of

Wm Ryland dec’d

______________________

2010

Filed Mch 31′ 1876

Hearing on

May 1 1876

Allowed & Confirmed

May 1′ 1876

John Taylor, Probate Judge

Recorded Page 39. Vol. 16

Transcription ends.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THEIR LIVES

Both John Ryland and John Ewing bought land in Hopewell Township, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, along the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River. They are involved in a legal battle over land on the Raystown Branch of the Juniata River (John Ryland’s brother James is also named in the suit). Therefore, John Ryland’s son William and John Ewing’s daughter Catherine have the opportunity to marry.

William and Catherine indeed marry in late 1813 or early 1814.

John Ryland dies before February 9, 1814.

William oversees the inventory and appraisement, done by March 1814.

John Ewing sells land to William and Catherine, in Ashland County, Ohio, in June 1814.

William and Catherine have their first child in March 1815.

William finishes administering his father’s estate in April 1815.

They move to Ohio in fall of 1815 with their first daughter Mary Ann.

They settle in Richland County, out of which grows Ashland County, on February 24, 1846.

They bought and sold land. Mainly they farmed, teaching his sons and daughters about the farming life.

French traveler and culture critic De Tocqueville said American politics was local. In the first half of the 1840s William was elected trustee of Ashland County four years in a row (no doubt the local historian H. S. Knapp didn’t calculate the change of county lines). In any case, William was known around the county to be elected for four years in a row. It also showed he had community spirit; he cared about his immediate homeland. He wanted to see it managed properly. William Ryland proved that De Tocqueville was right.

They had eleven children, all but one of whom got married and raised children (Susan is the exception).

They grew up to become productive members of society.

It is said that happiness is knowing your children grew up to become genuinely good people.  There is wisdom in that.

William died a prosperous farmer, in 1867. Dying in 1874, Catherine lived seven years longer than he did. The expression “salt of the earth” comes to mind about William and Catherine.

See his son William Jr.’s posts divided up by his two marriages:

Sarah Baird

Hannah Jane Vickers (our direct line).

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