Thomas Gray and Anna S. Leakey

This post goes from 1799 to 1857.

THOMAS → Nancy Margaret m. Amonet Washington WilbournWilliam HarveyElla Washington (Rae) (our grandmother)

Here is Anna’s Leakey / Lackey generational chain:

 Alexander → Thomas → Joel → ANNA S. m. THOMAS (See above)

A Sketch

Thomas Gray

He was born in February 1799, in SC. He married Anna S. Leaky before 1820 in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. He died on October 20, 1853, Bienville Parish, LA.

More about him:

A grave marker has been recently found, which reads: Thomas Gray Born Feb. 1799. Died Oct 20, 1853. Aged 54 Yrs 8 Mos. His death records first went through the process of probate April 3, 1854. So his date of death, October 20, 1853, seems a little early, but in the end I trust it. Between those dates, he lived with James Bridges and worked his land in Louisiana by 1819 (see the section Land Acquisitions, below). That means he was taking on a huge responsibility at 20 years old. That also means he moved to LA when he was in his late teens, or perhaps earlier, if he was with his parents or other relatives. Clearly he was getting trained with James Bridges, before he stepped out on his own and prospered as a large plantation owner. Spelling variation on his name: Grey.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=27967704

Anna S. Leakey

She was born in about 1802 to 1806 in Knox County, KY. She died after February 17, 1855, in Bienville Parish, LA, and before the 1860 Census.

More about her:

One researcher says she died after February 17, 1855 (see the document so dated, below). That’s when her name appears and the document assumes she’s alive. In a September 28, 1857 document she is not mentioned, but it concerns the children. So it is best to state that she died sometime after February 17, 1855. And to my knowledge, she does not appear in the 1860 Census. Spelling variations: Lakey. Her ancestors’ name variation is also Lackie, Lacky. We don’t know what her middle initial stands for. Sarah? Susan?

Their Children

  1. Ruth
  2. Nancy Margaret (our direct line)

See her post here: Amonet and Nancy Margaret

3. Josiah

4. Simeon

5. Alexander

6. Thomas

7. Eliza

8. Abner

9. Elias

Some of these children are hard to find in the census records at ancestery.com, though a thorough search was done. Maybe someone else will discover them. We did the best we could.

  1. Ruth

She was born about 1824. She married William S. Simmons. One online researcher at ancestry.com says she died in 1878, Hill County Texas.

More about her:

We find out the name of her husband in the document dated January 17, 1855 (below).

1850

In the 1850 Census, Township 23, 3rd Ward, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, Ruth is 26 years old and from Louisiana. She is marked down as unable to read or write. Wm S. Simmons is 32, a planter, and from Tennessee (but see the next two censuses for a different state). Thomas is 8; James is 5; and Robert is 3. They’re from Louisiana. James Beck is 20, from Tennessee, and deaf. The household lives next door to Ruth’s sister Nancy Wilbourn (spelled Wellborne in the census).

1860

In the 1860 Census, Meridian Township, Clifton Post Office, Bourque County, Texas, Ruth is 36 and from Louisiana. William is a 41-year-old blacksmith from Illinois. Their real estate is valued at $125.00, while their personal property is $800.00. Thos is 17 and a laborer; Robt is 13; John is 11; Mary is 6, and Sarah is also 6 (twins); Francis is 4 and Elias is 2. The kids are from Louisiana (see the 1870 Census for other birth states). Robert down to Sarah have attended school within the year.

1870

In the 1870 Census, Precinct 4, Hillsboro Post Office, Hill County, Texas, Ruth Simmons is 45, and her occupation is unstated. She’s from Louisiana. W. S. Simmons is 52 and a blacksmith from Illinois. Francis, a boy, is 14 and from Louisiana; Elias, 12, is from Texas (sic); Benjamin is 10; Price, a boy, is 8; and Rebecca is 4. The latter three kids are from Louisiana. Robert Simmons (23) lives next door with the William (30) and Sarah (16) Stuart family. William is a blacksmith, but Robert’s occupation is not stated.

  1. Nancy Margaret or Margaret Nancy

She is our direct line. See her post here:

Amonet and Nancy Margaret

  1. Josiah

He was born about 1829, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

More about him:

He signed his younger brother Alexander’s marriage license in 1859, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, he is 21 and a student. He is a member of his father’s household.

Josiah appears in a number of land records for Natchitoches Parish, as follows:

Sequence #: 1 Document Number: 10601 Total Acres: 76.5 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: 1 Apr 1859 Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries Land Description:

1 NESW No. 18N 8W 31

2 NWSE No. 18 N 8 W 31

Sequence #: 1 Document Number: 11262 Total Acres: 76.5 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: 1 Apr 1859 Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries Land Description:

1 SESW No. 18 N 8 W 31

2 SWSE No. 18 N 8 W 31

Source: ancestry.com

It seems he should show up in the 1860 Census taken in that parish, but a search of every page comes up empty.

  1. Simeon

He was born in about 1833, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. On January 28, 1858, he married Lucinda F. Pearce, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

More about him:

On February 17, 1855, he was appointed one of the guardians of the minor children, after the decease of their father. The marriage license clearly says Lucindia, not Lucinda, but these documents often have many variations. At the signature portion it looks like Simenon on the license, which shows the loose way of spelling and signing names. The name in the margin and license itself clearly says Simeon. Witnesses were T. Thachandon (?) and J. S. Waring or Haring (looks more like Haring). Rev. James A David officiated.

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, Simon (or Siman) is a 17-year-old laborer who lives in his father’s household.

Simeon has land record for Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, as follows:

Sequence #: 1 Document Number: 10602 Total Acres: 37.35 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: 1 Apr 1859 Mineral Rights Reserved: No Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries Land Description:

1 SESE No. 17 N 8 W 6

Source: ancestry.com

It seems he should show up in the 1860 Census in that parish, but a search of every page comes up empty.

There is a Simeon Gray who fought in the Civil War. Is he this one?

Name: Simeon Gray Side: Confederate Regiment State/Origin: Louisiana Regiment Name: Capt. Webb’s Company, Louisiana Cavalry Regiment Name Expanded: Webb’s Company, Louisiana Cavalry Rank In: Private Rank In Expanded: Private Rank Out: Private Rank Out Expanded: Private Film Number: M378 roll 12

Source: ancestry.com

In an 1860 land record, a Lucinda Gray gets 317.83 acres of land in Monroe Parish. Could this be Simeon’s wife? Did he die before that year? (Source: ancestry.com)

1870

In the 1870 Census, Ward 6, Assumption County, Louisiana, there is a strange coincidence or the census is marked wrong. A certain Simon (37 = b. 1833), born in Maryland, and Lucinda (30), born in Louisiana, are written down as “B” for black. They have a boy named George (10). Other neighboring families are also black and work on a plantation, though a few are white. It could be that this family, now free in 1870, took the names of their former owners.

  1. Alexander H (J or W?)

He was born February 1835, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. He married Mildred Ann Bozeman, on January 4, 1859, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. She was born December 1840.

More about him:

Witnesses who signed the marriage license were Josiah Gray and J T Boseman. Josiah is Alexander’s older brother. Rev. N T Moore officiated.

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western district, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, he is 15 and lives in his father’s household.

1900

In the 1900 Census, Justice Precinct 2, Shelby County, Texas, Alexander Gray is 65 (= b. 1835). He was born February 1835. His father was from North Carolina, and his mother from Ohio. He’s a farmer who can read and write. Mildred A. is 59 and born December 1840. They’ve been married 43 years. They’ve had 6 kids, 5 of whom are still living. She and her parents are from Alabama. She can read and write. Alex and she rent their farm. Aaron McGranner (?) is their grandchild who was born May 1900. He and his parents are from Louisiana (if his birth state is recorded correctly, then he was just taken out to Texas). John S. Gray is their son, who is 33 and born July 1866. He is a widower and a farm laborer. He and his parents are from Louisiana. He can read and write. Byron Gray is Alex and Mildred’s grandson who is 5 years old and was born December 1894. He’s from Texas, and his parents are from Louisiana. Presumably this is John’s son.

  1. Thomas

He was born in about 1838, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

More about him:

A certain Thomas H. Gray married E. E. Causey (Carry?), in Bienville Parish, in October 1870 (day not recorded or badly copied), in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. But that date seems a little late for this Thomas, unless it was his second marriage. Witnesses were E F Roberts, T J Causey, Eld (sic) Rev. Joseph Lolley

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, he is 12 and attended school within the year.

1860

In the 1860 Census, Columbia Post Office, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, there is a Thomas C. Gray who is from Louisiana and attends South Carolina College. He’s 22, so his birth year is 1838. Thomas Sr.’s 1850 Census (see below) says Sr. was born in South Carolina, so maybe there’s a connection. But it’s not clear whether this Thomas C. is the right one, because the Gray name is common enough back in Louisiana, and Thomas is a common first name.

  1. Eliza

She was born in about 1841, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. She was a minor when her father died.

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, she is 9 and attended school within the year.

Since we don’t know whom she married, we’ve lost track of her.

  1. Abner

He was born in about 1845, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana

More about him:

In all the legal documents (below), he is named as just Abner, not Allen. One researcher slashes his name Abner / Allen.

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, Allen is 5.

  1. Elias

He was born in about 1849, in Bienville Parish, Louisiana. He was a small kid when his father died – and mother.

More about him:

1850

In the 1850 Census, Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, Elias is 1.

Sources for all the above children: censuses at ancestery.com; abstracts of marriage licenses, Bienville Parish, Louisiana (Book B page 332, A 324; A 289)

Sources: 1850 Census; abstracts of marriage licenses, Bienville Parish, LA (Book B page 332, A 324; A 289); another researcher from Dallas, TX, who descends from this family line. Her work may be found here:

Claiborne and Bienville Parishes

So how do we sort out the two parishes? “The Louisiana Legislature, April 12, 1848, passed an act creating the parish of Bienville from the southern portion of Claiborne Parish which had been in existence for about twenty years.” Sparta became the county seat (History of Bienville Parish, vol. 1, page 30).

One sketch of Claiborne Parish, or more specifically, of the first settler there, John Murrell, mentions our Thomas Gray.

It reads:

During the first two years [from March 29, 1819] several families settled in Flat Lick Community. There were Martin and James Allen, Obadiah Driskill, Abraham Crownover, Jessie Williams, Thomas Gray, Dr. Hugh Walker (a self trained doctor), Adam and Nedham Reynolds, Joseph Edwards or Edmonds, John and James McCarty, William M. Gryder (first blacksmith in area), Daniel Moore, Mr. Holcomb, and Mr. Brazil. J. McCrady or McCarthy raised the first significant cotton crop in 1826, about the time the first slaves appeared in the area. (Susan T. Herring, editor the Guardian-Journal, “Father of Claiborne Parish,” April 29, 1999)

So this timeframe matches up with the surviving data in this file on Thomas Gray – or at least the article does not contradict the data in this file.

The History of Bienville Parish supports the article in the Guardian-Journal. The history reads: “William Napoleon Potts stated in his autobiography that the Potts, Gray, Howard and Polk families were early settlers of the area” (vol. 1, p. 65).

Then in the section on Brushy Valley in the same History of Bienville Parish, vol. 1, it says that the Gray family was a partner in a horse track:

One source of information stated that Brushy Valley was a “place where gossip abounded.” Perhaps this was because it was also where folks gathered for amusement and entertainment. Dances were held almost every week at one or another of the plantation homes. A track for horse racing, owned by the Potts, Howard and Gray families, brought people to the community from miles afar. They came bringing their favorite steeds, [copy cuts off text] or having the fastest horse in this part of the country, as one man said, “They came to do a lot of horse trading.” (pp. 65-66)

As to the weekly dances, we listen in on the quoted words of a certain William Potts, whose father settled in Brushy Valley in 1852. “The Potts at Brushy Valley were all Baptists but not all hide bound for they danced and played cards like Episcopalians. Every plantation had at least one Negro fiddler and we gathered at least once a week and sometimes oftener” (p. 65).

Next, recall that Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn, mother of Amonet, Ella Washington Wilbourn’s grandfather, came from South Carolina and settled in Bienville Parish. “Nearly all of Brushy Valley’s pioneers were from South Carolina, well-educated and considered well-to-do.” Elizabeth Ann’s family-in-law was indeed well-to-do) (History of Bienville Parish, vol. 1, p. 65).

In the same post on Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn, the community founded the Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church and a nearby school.  Church life was very strict. These are the words of William Potts, whose father came to Brushy Valley in 1852.

After a few years at Brushy Valley, Father sent me to school at Mt. Lebanon. This school was called a college and had regular college curriculum. It was a Baptist college in every sense of the word. There were seven Baptist preachers in Mr. Lebanon and the surrounding county was filled with Baptists. No intoxicating liquors were allowed to be sold within ten miles of the college so the boys either had to steal horses out of the stables at night, ride to Arcadia for whiskey, or drink Hostetters bitters. I was only suspended from the school twice, while attending this school, once for attending a circus in Arcadia (they would not allow such shows in Mt. Lebanon) and the other time was for going to hear Ben Pierce make a political speech at Mt. Lebanon. Neither, in my estimation, were very serious offenses. I would have been expelled, on one occasion, for abusing and trying to force a fight out the principal, Mr. Prescott, had it not been for the friendship and intervention of the president . . . . (History of Bienville Parish, vol. 1, p. 65)

Thomas Gray’s Census Records

1840

Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Thomas Gray is the head of household. One male is under 5; one is 5-9; one is 10-14; and one is 40-49. One female is 5-9; one is 10-14; one is 15-19; and one is 40-49. One male slave is under 16; one is 16-23; one is 36-54; one female is under ten; one is 16-23; employed in agriculture totals 7.

1850

Western District, Bienville Parish, Louisiana.

Thomas Gray is 50, a farmer, owns $6000.00 of property; his birthplace is South Carolina’ Anna is 44 and born in Kentucky. Her occupation is unstated, but it’s keeping house. Josiah Gray is 21 and a student. Simon (sic) is 17 and a laborer. Alexander is 15; Thomas is 12 and attended school within the year; Eliza is 9 and attended school within the year; Allen is 5; Elias Gray is 1. Every child is from Louisiana.

Thomas Gray’s Land Acquisitions

Chris Womack is a mighty fine researcher, and graciously sent me information on Anna S. (Leakey) Gray’s lineage. She also sent me the next entry.

Natchitoches County, Louisiana. Thomas Gray settled and cultivated land, by February 19, 1822. Joel Leakey is Thomas Gray’s (future) father-in-law, and Thomas Leakey is Joel’s son.

Claims to Land between the Rio Hondo and Sabine Rivers in Louisiana. House of Representatives Report Number 445 18th Congress – Second Session

Page 115:

132 Thomas Gray, of the parish of Natchitoches, assignee of James Bridges, filed his notice claiming by virtue of occupation, habitation, and cultivation, a tract of land lying within the late neutral territory, situated on the waters of the Negreite bayou, bounded on the north by claim of Samuel Davenport, and containing 640 acres. The claim is supported by the following testimony taken before the board:

Joel Leaky and Thomas Leaky, being sworn, say they know the land claimed by Thomas Gray in his above notice; that said land was inhabited, occupied, and cultivated by James Bridges, under whom the claimant holds, by his living and growing corn, &c., thereon, on and previous to February 22, 1819; that said inhabitation, occupation, and cultivation has been continued by said Bridges and by claimant since that period to the present time; and that the claimant’s improvements on the land claimed embrace about ten acres.”

We are of opinion this claim out [ought] tho [to] be confirmed, and in abstract have classed it with claims of the “third class.”

133 Thomas Gray, of the parish of Natchitoches, assignee of John Mackey, filed his notice claiming, by virtue of occupation, habitation, and cultivation, a tract of land lying within the late neutral territory, situated on the waters of the Negreite bayou, bounded, as is supposed by vacant land, and containing 640 acres. The claim is supported by following testimony taken before the board:

Joel Leaky, being sworn, says he knows the land claimed by Thomas Gray, assignee of John Mackey, in his above notice; that said land is situate and lying as is therein described; that said land was occupied, inhabited and cultivated on and previous to February 22, 1819, by John Mackey, under whom the claimant holds, by his living and cutting cane, &c., thereon.”

“Nicholas Jacks, being sworn, says he knows the land above claimed; that the same was occupied, inhabited, and cultivated in the years 1820, 1821, and 1822, and has reason to believe that the same has been uninterruptedly continued from February 22, 1819, until this time.”

We are of the opinion this claim outh [ought] to be confirmed, and in the abstract have classed it with claims of the “third class.”

Probate Records

April 3 and 19, 1854. William B. Stewart was a notary public. The court asked him to take inventory of Thomas Gray’s estate, deceased. Stewart appointed Edward J. Kennon, Kirk P. McDaniel, Jacob Pearce, John S. Pearce, Simion Grey, and Josiah Grey. They went to the plantation on April 19, 1854. The (X) between Anna Gray’s name means she signed with her mark, not her signature.

The following records are part of the Bienville Parish Court, Thomas Gray Probate Package #173.

Succession of Thomas Gray

Inventory and Appraisment [sic]

Filed April the 20th 1854

J. F. Stephens

Clerke

Recorder

The State of Louisiana

Bienville Parish

Be it Remembered that on this the nineteenth day of April in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty four A.D. 1854; I William B. Stewart a Notary Public in and for said Parish and State duly Commissioned and sworn according to law, In pursuance of a Commission and authority issued from the Hon. the District Court of the Parish of Bienville is composing a part of the 17th Judicial District; bearing date the 3rd April 1854, and to me directed, authorizing and requiring me said Notary to make and take a true correct and faithful Inventory and appraisement of all the property found in said Parish of Bienville, both real and personal rights & credits composing and belonging to the Estate and succession of Thomas Grey late of said Parish and State dec’d for which purpose I said Notary repaired on this said 19th day of April A.D. 1854 to the late residence of the said Thomas Grey dec’d in said Parish of Bienville for the purpose of making and taking said Inventory and Appraisement, & proceeded to appoint Edward J. Kennon and Kirk P. McDaniel, both residents of said Parish two good and lawful appraisers to appraise the same.  I also called Jacob Pearce and John S. Pearce also residents of said Parish as witnesses to assist in making said Inventory, I also notified Simion Grey and Josiah Grey, all the legal Heirs of age residing in said Parish to be present at the making and taking said Inventory and appraisment, and after having duly sworn said appraisers according to law, the said Appraisers together with me said Notary in presence of said witnesses and in presence of the above named Heirs, proceeded to make and take said Inventory and Appraisement- as follows “to wit”

The North 1/2 of the South 1/2 of Sec. No. 6- Township No 17- Range No 8– The East 1/2 of the NE 1/4 & the S.W. 1/4 of NE 1/4 & the South E 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Sec No. 6 Township No 17 Rang [sic] No 8– & the NW of the N.E. & the North East of N.W. 1/4 [?.] of Sec No. 6- Township No. 17, Range 8 & the west 1/2 of the N.W. 1/4 of Sec No. 6 Township No. 17 Range 8– Containing 374 25/100 acres together with all the Improvements thereon appraised at-

$4.00 per acre……………. $1497.00

Also one other woodland tract described as follows

The SW 1/4 of the S.E. 1/4 & the S.E. 1/4 of the S.W. 1/4 & the S.W. 1/4 of the S.W. 1/4 & the NW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section No 31- Township No. 18, Range No 8

Containing 148 acres-

Appraised @ $2.00 per acre, $296.00

Thomas Gray was a prosperous plantation owner, so that means he owned slaves. The list is an exact transcription, except the asterisks. Here is the final part of the appraisement. The X between Anny Gray’s name means she signed with her mark. It is this document that I first got in the mail, back in 1994. It moved me because I saw the old handwritten script laying out the Appraisement Table (below). It mentioned the names of slaves. That’s when I knew American history was real. Thereafter and ever since I’ve been hooked on this kind of research.

See My ancestors owned slaves on how to deal with this historical fact.

Transcription Begins:

The whole amount of the property Inventoried & appraised by us the said Appraisers and Notary, both real and personal rights and credits found in our said Parish Composing and belonging to the Succession of THOMAS GREY [sic] late of said Parish & State dec’d amounting to the sum of Fourteen Thousand four Hundred and Sixty One Dollars $14461.00 and there being no other property pointed out or shown to us the said appraisers and Notary, we have made taken and closed this Inventory and appraisement in presence of the afore named witnesses day and year first above written

Attest.

[signed] Jacob Pearce

[signed] John. S. Pearce

[signed] K P McDaniel

[signed] E J Kennon

[signed] Josiah Gray

[signed] Simeon Gray

ANNY (X) GRAY

Wm B. Stewart

Notary Public

1 Negro Man named Lewis of Black Complexion aged 63 years appraised @ 300 00
1 Negro Woman named Louiza of Black Complexion aged 35 years and her four Children. “viz” Charles a boy of Black Complexion aged 9 years; Mary a Girl of Black complexion aged 7 years; Charity a Girl of Black complexion aged 4 years& Lewis a boy of Black complexion aged 1 year Appraised at 1850 00
1 Negro Girl named Charlott of Black Complexion aged 15 years; (unsound) aprs’d @ 250 00
1 Negro Boy named Mack of Black  Complexion aged 13 years ” “ 900 00
1 Negro Girl named Harriet of Black Complexion aged 11 years 600 00
1 Negro Boy named Jack of Black Complexion aged 25 years 900 00
1 Negro man named Jordan of Black Complexion aged 23 years aprs’d @ 1300 00
1 Negro woman named Catharine of Yellow Complexion aged 21 years @ 900 00
1 Negro man named Bird of Black Complexion aged 24 years @ 1300 00
1 Negro woman named Lucy of Black Complexion aged 26 years- and her four Children “viz” Wesley a Boy of Yellow Complexion aged 9 years, Isaac a Boy of Black Complexion aged 5 years, Caroline aGirl of Black complexion aged 4 years and Rose a Girl of Black complexion aged 1 years appraised at 1600 00
Stock
1 Sorrel mare Appraised @ 60 00
1 “ Horse ” “ 25 00
1 ” mare mule” 60 00
1 Bay mare ” “ 60 00
1 ” Horse ” “ 60 00
1 Yoke work oxen, 1 Red with Ball face the other Brindle appraised at 36 00
1 Yoke work oxen Black & white pid[ed]” “ 36 00
1 ” ” ” ” ” ” ” “ 50 00
1 ” ” ” Red & Black ” ” “ 60 00
1 ” ” ” White & ” ” ” “ 60 00
1 odd work ox Black ” ” “ 10 00
43 Head Stock cattle @ $4.75 203 00
20 ” Sheep@ $1.75- 35 00
126 “ Hogs 189 75
17 Bee Stands @ $2.00 34 00
1 new Road wagon [sic] @ 70 00
5 Log Chairs @ $1.00 5 00
1 Old Road waggon Appraised @ 30 00
1 Set Black Smith Tools ” “ 20 00
11 Axes ” “ 5 00
1 Lot old Hoes ” “ 1 00
1 Fro. & 4 Iron wedges ” “ 1 00
1 Lot Plaines & other Tools ” “ 10 00
1 Cross Cut Saw ” “ 1 50
6 pr Plow gear Hoes Clevicis Single-tre[s]s & Plow stock ” “ 12 00
1 Grind Stone ” “ 1 00
1 Sythe [sic] Blade ” “ 50
1 500 lbs Fodder @ $1.00 15 00
400 Bushels corn @ 6p ” “ 300 00
1 100 lbs Bacon @ 10 c ” “ 110 00
150 ” Lard @ 10 c ” “ 15 00
1 Lot stone jars “ “ 4 00
1 Desk ” “ 1 00
1 Clothes Press ” “ 2 50
1 Rifle gun ” “ 10 00
1 ” Pistole ” “ 2 50
4 Beds steads & Furniture @ $10. ” “ 40 00
1 Cupboard ” “ 2 00
1 Lot chairs ” “ 1 00
1 ” Crockery ware & Glass ” “ 3 00
1 Small Hair Trunk ” “ 50
1 Lot Kitchen Furniture ” “ 3 00
2 pr Fire [sic] Dogs @ 4p ” “ 1 00
1 Lot Cotten “supposed” 13640 lbs @ 7 1/2 c “ 1023 00
Cash on hand 93 75
Total 14461 00
The above described propperty [sic] is Inventoried and appraised as community property held between Anny Lakey the surviving partner and widow of the said Thomas Grey dec’d & the legal Heirs and Representatives of said Thomas Grey dec’d
Recappitulation [sic]
Landed Propperty [sic] Appraised at 1793 00
Slaves ” “ 9900 00
Personal Propperty [sic] ” “ 2674 75
Cash on Hand 93 75
Total amt 14461 00

The whole amount of the property Inventoried & appraised by us the said Appraisers and Notary, both real and personal rights and credits found in our said Parish Composing and belonging to the Succession of Thomas Grey late of said Parish & State dec’d amounting to the sum of Fourteen Thousand four Hundred and Sixty One Dollars $14461.00 and there being no other property pointed out or shown to us the said appraisers and Notary, we have made taken and closed this Inventory and appraisement in presence of the afore named witnesses day and year first above written

Attest.

[signed] Jacob Pearce

[signed] John. S. Pearce

[signed] K P McDaniel

[signed] E J Kennon

[signed] Josiah Gray

[signed] Simeon Gray

Anny (X) Gray

[signed]Wm B. Stewart

Notary Public

January 17, 1855. After the Inventory and Appraisement, the court required a partition (division) of the estate. Probate Package #173 Thomas Gray

In the District Court Parish of Bienville La

State of Louisiana

Parish of Bienville

Anna S Leakey Et al

    vs

Alexander Gray Et al

To William B Stewart a Notary Public in and for the Parish

and state aforesaid [crossed out:] /”Greeting”/ to any lawful officer of said parish & state Greeting

You are hereby commissioned authorized and empowered to make a partition of the land and slaves belonging to the succession of Thomas Gray Dec’d between Anna S. Leakey the surviving partner in community and Ruth Gray wife of William S Simmons Nancy Gray wife of Ammonett [sic] W. Willborn and Josiah Gray Simeon Gray Alexander Gray Thomas Gray Eliza Ann Gray Abner Gray and Elias Gray forced heirs of said Thomas Gray Dec’d and that you notify A J Colbert J P Geren and E J Kennon Experts to assist you in making partition  And you are further authorized and empowered to make and take an Inventory and appraisement or a supplemental Inventory and appraisement of the property of said succession should the same be necessary [careted in:] /to effect said partition./  And of your doings herein return make to our said Court according to law witness the Honorable Harman A Drew Judge of said Court Sparta January the 17th AD 1855

[signed] John F Stephens Clerk

February 14, 1855. Now the court has to swear in the experts: A. J. Colbert, E J Kinnon, Wm B. Stewart, and James P. Geren.

The State of Louisiana

Bienville Parish

We A.J. Colbert, E.J. Kennon and J.P. Geren Having been duly appointed experts to assist in making a partition in kind of all the Lands and Slaves composing and belonging to the succession of Thomas Gray late of said Parish dec’d between Anna S. Lakey the surviving partner in community and Ruth Gray wife of William  [S] Simons, Nancy Gray wife of Ammonett [sic] W. Wilbourn Josiah Gray, Simeon Gray, Alexander Gray [careted in:] /Thomas L Gray/ Eliza Ann Gray, Abner Gray and Elias Gray do solemnly swear that we will in proceeding to make said partition discharge our duties faithfully as experts to the best of our knowledge and ability——–

So help us god

Sworn to and subscribed before me the 14th day of February 1855

[signed] A. J. Colbert

[signed] E J Kinnon

[signed] Wm B. Stewart

[signed] James P. Geren

Notary Public

February 17, 1855. Anna Leakey must swear that she will perform her duties faithfully and impartially for her minor children. The (X) between her name means that she signed with her mark, not her signature.

State of Louisiana

Parish of Bienville

I Anna Leakey do solemnly swear that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all and singular the duty incumbent on my by law as Natural Tutor for Alexander Gray, Thomas L Gray Eliza Ann Gray, Abner Gray, and Elias Gray minor children and issue of my marriage with late husband Thomas Gray Dec’d according to the best of my knowledge and abilities so help me God.

Anna (X) Leakey

Sworn and subscribed before me this 17th day of February 1855

J F Stephens Clerk

February 17, 1855. Simeon Gray must swear that he will perform his duties faithfully and impartially as “Under Tutor” for the minor children of Thomas Gray, deceased. Simeon is the second-oldest brother of the minor children.

State of Louisiana

Parish of Bienville

I Simeon Gray do solemnly swear that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all and singular the duty incumbent on my by law as Under Tutor for Alexander Gray, Thomas L Gray Eliza Ann Gray, Abner Gray, and Elias Gray minor children and issue of my marriage with late husband Thomas Gray Dec’d according to the best of my knowledge and abilities so help me God.

Simeon Gray

Sworn and subscribed before me this 17th day of [words cut off by copying] February 1855

J F Stephens Clerk

September 28, 1857 and October 5, 1857. This document states that the partition of the estate of Thomas Gray, deceased, should be made to the children, major or minor. No word on Anna S. Leakey, wife of Thomas. Is she deceased?

Partition of the

proceeds of the Estate

of Thomas Gray

Dec’d

Recorders Com

mission to

make partition

Rec’d Sept 28th

A.D. 185[7]

[signed] John G. Noles

Recorder

Returned & Filed

October the 5th

1857 [signed] J F Stephens

Clerk

In the District Court

Parish of Bienville La

[smudged:] /Alexander/[?] Lakey

   vs

Alexander Gray Et al

To John G. Noles Recorder & Ex officio Notary Public in and for said parish and state “Greeting” you are hereby commissioned authorized and empowered to make a partition of the proceeds of the sale of the property belonging to the minor & major heirs of Thomas Gray Dec’d between said minor and major heirs share & share alike to wit Ruth Gray wife of William S Simons [sic] Nancy Gray wife of Ammonette [sic] W Willborn Joseph Gray Simeon Gray Alexander Gray Thomas Gray Eliza Ann Gray Abner Gray and Elias Gray forced heirs of said Thomas Gray Dec’d and that you notify AJ Colbert JP Geren and EJ Kennon Experts to assist you in making said partition and that you also notify the following special tutors to be present to represent the minors in said partition to wit James Howerton special tutor for Alexander Gray WC Mays for Thomas Gray Elbert N Warren for Eliza Ann Gray AJ Kolb for Abner Gray WC [Cohis] for Elias Gray And of your proceedings herein return make to our said Court according to law

Witness the Honorable W B Egan Judge of said Court Sparta

September the 28th AD 1857

[signed] John F Stephens

Clerk Dist Court

Summary

We have not been able to find Thomas’s ancestry, though we have searched everywhere in South Carolina, where his 1850 Census record says he came from.

Anna S. Leakey, on the other hand, has an illustrious family background. Her father was a co-founder of the Republic of Texas.

Thomas and Anna lived a genteel life in Louisiana. As all prosperous landowners did, they owned slaves. Nothing unusual there–wrong, but not unusual. See my article My ancestors owned slaves in how I handle that historical fact.

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