From Charlemagne to the Present Day

This post is a summary of many hours and years of research. The post covers basic dynastic facts that go through various family lines: Carolingians, Herbertines, Robertians, Capetians, Normans, and Plantagenets—to America.

This post is divided into these main sections:

GENEALOGICAL TABLES

LINE A

Carolingians to Herbertines, Normans, and Plantagenets

LINE B

Carolingians to Herbertines, Robertines, Capetians, Normans, and Plantagenets

LINE C

Carolingians to Herbertines, Robertines, Capetians, and Plantagenets

ENGLISH GENTRY

Why we do not live in Buckingham Palace

AMERICAN MERITOCRACY

Our American forebears worked hard to make it

ARTICLES IN THE SERIES

ANOTHER GENEALOGICAL PATH

From Charlemagne to the Dukes of Aquitaine to Eleanor of Aquitaine

SUMMARY OF DOUGLAS RICHARDSON’S LINES

RELATED

SOURCES

Let’s begin.

GENEALOGICAL TABLES

The goal here is always to bring us to William the Conqueror and his great-grandson Henry II, the first Plantagenet.

From the encyclopedia Medieval France and the Carolingians:

For good measure, here are Constance Bouchard’s tables on the Carolingians:

It’s replete with information, revealing event he connection from Charlemagne to the dukes of Aquitaine, the ancestors of Eleanor of Aquitaine, who married Henry II, the first Plantagenet.

Another table by Bouchard:

Next, Michael Idomir Allen’s Table 8, which he put together for his translation of Pierre Riché’s the Carolingians, shows the connection between the Carolingians, Herbertines, and Robert (I) king of West Franks, a Robertian (Robertine):

Notice that Herbert I’s daughter married Robert I. He is the grandfather of Hugh Capet, the Founder of the Capetians.

Let’s keep going. Allen’s Table 4, illustrating the Robertians to Robert II, a Capetian. Note Beatrix’s reappearance in this table (m. to Robert I):

Yes, the Capetians descend from Charlemagne. For the primary source evidence, click on Herbert I, Count of Vermandois, and scroll down to the Addendum.

The above table leaves off with Robert II, the Pious.

Here is W. L. Warren’s table from his excellent biography Henry II, illustrating the connection between Robert II (the Pious) and the Normans (William the Conqueror) to Henry II.

In that table Robert the Pious is Robert II. He leads to the Capetians on the left, the dukes of Aquitaine and their famous descendant Eleanor in the middle, and the Normans on right. On the left are the Capetians. We descend from them from all of them.

Let’s look at the Capetians in a fuller table:

In the above table, on the right is Pierre (Peter), son of Louis V. Pierre / Peter had a granddaughter named Isabel of Angoulême (not shown), who married King John of England, Plantagenet (see below).

Let’s take stock. So far we traced them down to King Henry II (in the table above the Capetians).

Dan Jones’s table from his book the Plantagenets:

The simplest table of all is by Tracy Borman, who wrote a biography about William the Conqueror’s wife, Matilda of Flanders. Matilda’s line goes right back to Charlemagne:

Matilda and William are on the bottom right. Remember, William the Conqueror is the great-grandfather of Henry II, the first Plantagenet.

Let’s back up and look at the Viking side. The lineage will also go through William the Conqueror, then Henry I, Empress Matilda, and reach Henry II. Here are Marjorie Chibnall’s first two tables on the House of Normandy:

And that last table, above, brings us to Henry II again.

Here is C. Warren Hollister’s table of the House of Normandy to the Plantagenets:

So we have these links in the chain from Rollo (Rolf the Viking) to Henry II, the first Plantagenet:

From the Normans tot he Present Day

RolloWilliam LongswordRichard IRichard IIRobert IWilliam the Conqueror –  Empress Matilda – Henry IHenry II

Let’s summarize the information in the tables.

There is a new line from Charlemagne to the Capetians and to the House of Normandy, going through Beatrix, daughter of Herbert I, a male descendant of Charlemagne, and Beatrix married Robert I, who was a very early founder (of sorts) of the Capetians (see Line B, below). The line is new because Richardson does not cover it, and for lineage societies, his impressive five-volume Royal Ancestry and three-volume Plantagenet Ancestry (2nd ed.) are authoritative.

Once again, the Capetians descend from Charlemagne. For the primary source evidence, click on Herbert I, Count of Vermandois, and scroll down to the Addendum.

Next, the hinge figure is Robert II, Capetian. He is the link to the Capetians, the Normans, and the dukes to Aquitaine down to Henry II of England.

Henry II (Henry of Anjou) is the transitional figure from the Houses of Normandy to Anjou and Plantagenets. Henry’s father Geoffrey was the Count of Anjou and wore a yellow broom blossom called a planta genista in Latin, or Plantagenet:

In a nutshell: Normans → Angevins → Plantagenets.

We don’t keep track of the line that goes from Charlemagne to Eleanor of Aquitaine, but Bouchard’s table says it is well linked from one generation to the next.

b.. = born

d.. = died

c.. or ca.. = circa = around or about

Let’s begin.

LINE A

Carolingians to Herbertine, Normans, and Plantagenets

The family of Vermandois is known also as the Herbertines, after several ancestors named Herbert.

William the Conqueror and his father Robert I (no. 11, below) and his grandfather Richard II (no. 10) are Normans or of the House of Normandy.

Our Line A here (and Richardson’s Line A in volume 5 of Royal Ancestry) follows Allen’s Table 8 and the Herbertine line down to the Normans.

The first four generations are Carolingians.

1. Charlemagne (748-814) and Hildegard (d. 783)

2. Pippin (773-810) and Mistress

3. Bernard (b. c. 797-818) and Cunegonde

4. Pippin (d. after 840) and Wife

5. Herbert I (b. c. 850- d. c. 900-07) and Wife

He was the Count of Vermandois, and this lineage is known as the Herbertines.

6. Herbert II (880-943) and Adele of France

She was the daughter of Robert I (see Line B no. 6, below)

7. Robert (b. c. 931-34 – d. after 966) and Adelaide (Werra) (d. after 967)

Historians don’t cover him in a separate book, since he is not as famous as his some of his ancestors and descendants.

But he is a link in our chain, and here are his vital statistics.

He was born between 931 and 934. He was Count of Meaux from 946 and after 966. In right of his wife he became Count of Troyes. He married Adelaide before 18 June 950. She was the daughter of Giselbert, Duke of Burgundy, Count of Chalon-sur-Saone, Troyes, Autun, Avalois, and Beaunois, by his wife Ermengard.

They had one son: Herbert, Count of Meaux and Troyes; and one daughter: Adele.

Robert died probably died after 19 June 966. His wife Adelaide was living in Aug 967.

8. Adele (d. before 979) and Geoffrey I Greymantle (d. 987)

They are not as famous as some of their ancestors or descendants, so historians don’t cover them thoroughly, but they are important to us, so here are their vital facts:

They married in about 965. He was the Count of Anjou in 958 or 960 to 987. He was Count of Chalon, 979-987. He was the son of Foulques (Fulk), the Good, Count of Anjou, by his wife Gerberge. His nickname in French is Grisegonelle or Greymantle in English.

They had two sons: Foulques (Fulk) III Nerra, Count of Anjou; and Geoffrey.

They had two daughters: Ermengard and Gerberge, wife of Guillaume (William) IV, Count of Angoulême.

Adele was living 6 Mar 974, but he married a second time 20 or 9 (sic) Mar 997 Adele, widow of Lambert I, Count of Chalon-sur-Saone, who died 22 Feb 978. They had one son, Maurice.

Geoffrey was killed in battle at Marçon (near Chateau-du-Loir, sic) 21 July 987 and was buried at Saint Martin de Tours. His widow was living in 999.

Does his second marriage mean Adele died before Geoffrey’s second marriage, or did he divorce her? Let’s say she died.

9. Ermengard of Anjou and Conan I (b. c. 922-992)

They are not famous either, so they don’t have their own post at this website. Here are the basics:

He was born about 922. Duke of Brittany, he was nicknamed le Tort (in modern French, that means “the Wrong” or “Culpable”). He was the son of Judicael Berengar, Count of Rennes, by his wife Gerberge.

Conan married Ermengard about 973.

They had four sons: Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany; Judicael, Bishop of Vannes; Catuallon, Abbot of Redon; and Urvod.

They had one daughter: Judith.

In 981 Conan fought in a battle against Guerich, Count of Nantes and his Angevin allies, which is called the first Battle of Conquereux. He was killed at the Second Battle of Conquereux near Nantes on 27 June 992.

10. Judith (d. 1017) and Richard II (d. 1026)

11. Robert I, Duke of Normandy (d. 1035) and Arlette (or Herleve or Herleva) (d. c. 1051)

12. William I Duke Normandy and King of England (b. c. 1028 to 1087) and Matilda of Flanders (d. 1083)

13. Henry I of England (1068/9-1135) and Edith-Matilda of Scotland (1079-1118)

14. Empress Matilda (1102-1167) and Geoffrey of Anjou (1113-1151)

She first married Heinrich / Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor. They had no issue. When he died, she moved back to Normandy and England kept her title Empress.

15. Henry II of England (1133-1189) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (b. c. 1124-1204)

See below for genealogical tables that trace Eleanor’s lineage all the way back to Charlemagne.

16.  John of England (1166-1249) and Isabel of Angoulême (1188-1246)

He’s the one who was compelled to sign the Magna Carta, thereafter used to proclaim freedom for the upper classes and eventually the lower ones.

17. Henry III of England (1207-1272) and Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291)

18. Edward I of England (1239-1307) and Eleanor of Castile (b. c. 1241 to 1290)

We will move forward to the present day after Line C.

LINE B

Carolingians to Herbertines, Robertines, Capetians, Normans, and Plantagenets

Line B adds the Capetians.

1. Charlemagne (748-814) and Hildegard (d. 783)

2. Pippin (773-810) and Mistress

3. Bernard (b. c. 797-818) and Cunegonde

4. Pippin (d. after 840) and Wife

5. Herbert I (b. c. 850- d. c. 900-07) and Wife

6. Beatrix (c. 880 – d. c. 930) and Robert I (b. c. 865-923)

7. Hugh the Great (d. 956) and Hadwig

8. Hugh Capet (c. 939-996) and Adelaide (Adele) of Poitou (b. c. 940-d. 1003/05)

9. Robert II (b. 970/74-1031) and Constance (d. 1032)

10. Adele (1009-1079) and Baldwin V of Flanders (b. c. 980-85-1035)

Baldwin (Baudouin) V was the Count / Marquis of Flanders, from 1035 to 1067 and Regent of France 1060-1067, son and heir. He was born about 1010. Baldwin married at Paris in 1028 Adele of France. As seen just above, Adele was Robert’s daughter by his third wife Constance, daughter of William II, Count of Arles (Provence). Adele was born probably in 1009.

Baldwin died at Lille on 1 Sep 1067 and was buried in the church of St. Pierre (Peter), Lille.

Adele retired to the Abbey of Messine near Ypres, where she died 8 Jan 1079.

They had two sons: Baldwin (VI) Count / Marquis of Flanders, Count of Hainault; and Robert the “Frisian,” Count of Flanders;

They also had one daughter: Matilda, also called Maud.

11. Matilda of Flanders (d. 1083) and William I of Normandy and England (b. c. 1028 to 1087)

See Line A, no. 12, above.

12. Henry I of England (1068/9-1135) and Edith-Matilda of Scotland (1079-1118)

13. Empress Matilda (1102-1167) and Geoffrey of Anjou (1113-1151)

14. Henry II of England (1133-1189) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (b. c. 1124-1204)

15.  John of England (1166-1249) and Isabel of Angoulême (1188-1246)

16. Henry III of England (1207-1272) and Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291)

17. Edward I of England (1239-1307) and Eleanor of Castile (b. c. 1241-1290)

We will move forward to the present day after Line C.

LINE C

Carolingians to Herbertines, Robertines, Capetians, and Plantagenets

Let’s begin the lineage.

1. Charlemagne (748-814) and Hildegard (d. 783)

2. Pippin (773-810) and Mistress

3. Bernard (b. c. 797-818) and Cunegonde

4. Pippin (d. after 840) and Wife

5. Herbert I (b. c. 850- d. c. 900-07) and Wife

6. Beatrix (b. c. 880 – d. c. 930) and Robert I (b. c. 865-923)

7. Hugh the Great (d. 956) and Hadwig

8. Hugh Capet (c. 939-996) and Adelaide (Adele) of Poitou (b. c. 940-d. 1003/05)

9. Henri I of France (1008-1060) and Anne of Kiev (1036-d. c. 1075-87)

10. Philippe I of France (1053-1108) and Bertha of Holland (b. c. 1058-1117)

11. Louis VI of France (1081-1137) and Alix (Alice) of Savoy (1092-1154)

12. Pierre or Peter (b. c. 1125-d. c. 1180-83) and Elizabeth of Courtenay (d. after 1205)

He was born about 1125. He was by right of his wife seigneur of Courtenay, Montargis, Chateau-Renard, Champignelles (in part), Tanlay, Charny, and Chanteroq. He married Elizabeth or Isabel of Courtenay, daughter of Renaud de Courtenay, seigneur of Courtenay, Montargis, Chateau-Renard, Champignelles, etc., by ____, daughter of Ferri or Frederic of Bourges.

Peter and Elizabeth had five sons:

Pierre, Robert, Philip, William, John

Peter and Elizabeth also had six daughters:

Alix or Alice, Eustache, Clemence, Isabelle, Constance, Agnes

During a crusade, Pierre died in Palestine 10 Mar, sometime between 1180 and 10 Apr 1183. His widow Elizabeth died 14 Sep post-1205.

13. Alix (Alice) (b. c. 1060-1218) and Adémar or Aymar (1157-1202)

Alice was born about 1160. She married (1) Andre de Montmirial, seigneur of Montmirial (Marne in arrondissement or district Epernay) and of La Ferté-Gaucher (Seine-et-Marne, arrondissement Coulomiers), son and heir of Helias.

They had no issue.

He died 13 June after 1177 and before 1179.

Alice married (2) Guillaume or William I, Count of Joigny, near Auxerre.

They had one son: Pierre

They divorced on grounds of consanguinity. Guillaume died 15 Feb 1219.

The beauty of Alice is supposed to have caught the eye of William Marshall, the greatest knight, and Young Henry, during a tournament at Joigny in about 1180.

Alice married (3) before 1191 Adémar or Aymar, Count of Angoulême, younger son of Guillaume or William V, Count of Angoulême, by his second wife Marguerite, daughter of Raymond I, Vicomte (viscount) of Turenne, Adémar was born after 1157. He was heir to his older brother Guillaume, Count of Angouléme.

Alice and Aymar or Adémar had one daughter: Isabel of Angoulême

Aymar or Adémar went on a Crusade in 1178. He died at Limoges (Haute-Vienne) 16 June 1202.

His widow Alice lived an active life, donating to various churches. She was living in Ferté-Gaucher, which she held in dower of her first marriage.

She died 11 Feb about 1218.

14. Isabel of Angoulême (1188-1246) and John of England (1166-1216)

15. Henry III of England (1207-1272) and Eleanor of Provence (1223-1291)

16. Edward I of England (1239-1307) and Eleanor of Castile (b. c. 1241-1290)

ENGLISH GENTRY

Why we do not live in Buckingham Palace

Edward I’s daughter Joan is definitely part of the highest aristocracy, but from one generation to next our line becomes collateral and part of the gentry. Though no longer a member of the highest level, they were better off than most people.

Let’s pick up from Line C.

17. Joan of England and Gilbert de Clare

She was sometimes styled Joan of Acre because she was born at Acre, Palestine, in spring 1272. She was the second daughter of Edward I. She had two marriages. She married (1) Gilbert de Clare at Westminster Abbey about 30 Apr 1290 by dispensation dated 16 Nov 1289, since they were related in the 2nd or 3rd degrees. Joan was Gilbert’s second wife. He was a Knight and the 6th Earl of Hertford, Steward of St. Edmund’s Abbey, son and heir of Richard de Clare, Knight, and Earl of Gloucester and Hertford by his second wife Maud, daughter of John de Lacy, Knight, Earl of Lincoln, a Magna Carta Baron. He was born at Christchurch, Hampshire 2 Sep 1243. They had one son, Gilbert, Knight, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford; and three daughters: Eleanor, Margaret and Elizabeth. Son Gilbert married Maud de Burgh; daughter Eleanor married (1) Hugh le Despenser and (2) William la Zouche Mortimer; daughter Margaret married (1) Peter de Gavaston and (2 Hugh de Audley; daughter Elizabeth married (1) John de Burgh, (3) Thebaud de Verdun, and (3) Roger Damory. Their father and Joan’s first husband Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, died at Monmouth Castle 7 Dec 1295 and was buried at Tewkesbury Abbey, Gloucestershire.

Joan married a (2) second time to Ralph de Monthermer, early in 1297. His parentage is unclear. They had Mary, who married Duncan of Fife, Knight and 10th Earl of Fife in Scotland and of Glapthorn and Cotterstock, Northamptonshire, son and heir of Duncan of Fie, 9th Earl of Fife, by Joan, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, Knight and 6th Earl of Gloucester, 6th Earl of Hertfordshire.

Joan died 7 Apr 1307 and was buried in the Austin Friars at Clare, Suffolk.

As to Joan’s first marriage to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, Margaret Howell writes:

The matriarchal role which Eleanor of Provence could fulfill even near the end of her life is revealed by an important document dated at Amesbury [where Eleanor entered into religious life] dated 17 Apr 1290. It recorded an oath taken by Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, who was about to marry Edward I’s daughter Joan, to uphold the succession to the English Crown as it has been laid down by the king. Gloucester swore that in the event of the king’s death he would give his allegiance to Edward I’s surviving son, Prince Edward, who was of course a grandson of Eleanor of Provence. The boy was six years old at the time, and it was intended that he should marry Eleanor’s great-granddaughter Margaret, daughter of King Eric of Norway and heiress to the Scottish throne. On the same day that Gloucester made his oath, Edward I dispatched a letter to King Eric, asking him to send to send his daughter to England without delay, a papal dispensation for the marriage having now been secured. … The purpose of holding the meeting at Amesbury would have been a sense of the propriety of her involvement in this dynastic settlement. (p. 305)

The point here is that Eleanor of Provence was remarkably active for her family, even while living out her life as a religious woman.

18. Elizabeth de Clare and Roger Damory

She was born probably at Caerphilly, Glamorgan in Nov 1295. She was married three times: (1) John de Burgh, 2nd but 1st surviving son of Richard de Burgh, Knight, 3rd Earl of Ulster, Lord of Connaught by his wife Margaret. They married 30 Sep 1308 at Waltham Abbey, Essex. Their son was William de Burgh.

Her second (2) marriage was near Bristol on 4 Feb 1315/16 without the King’s license to Thebaud or Tebaud de Verdun, Knight, 2nd Lord Verdun, Buckinghamshire; Brandon in Wolston and Bretford in Wolston, Warwickshire; Wilsford, Wiltshire, etc. They had daughter Isabel de Verdun who married Henry De Ferrers.

Her third (3) marriage was to Roger Damory or Dammory or Damary before 3 May 1317. He performed well at the Battle of Bannockburn, so he and his wife Elizabeth were granted the manors of Vauxhall in Lambeth, Surrey; Holton, Oxfordshire; and Sandal, Yorkshire in 1317. He was summoned to Parliament from 20 Nov 1317 to 15 May 1321 by writs directed Rogero Damory or Dammory, whereby he is believed to have become Lord Damory.

He died testate at Tutbury Castle, Staffordshire 13 or 14 Mar 1321/22 and was buried at St. Mary’s Ware, Hertfordshire.

In 1338 she refounded University Hall at Cambridge University under the name of Clare Hall and gave it to the rectory of Great Gransden, Huntingdonshire.

Elizabeth died 4 Nov 1360 and was buried with her third husband at St. Mary’s Ware, Hertfordshire. She left a will dated 25 Sep 1355, proved 3 Dec 1360.

19. Elizabeth Damory and John Bardolf

She was daughter and heiress and was born before 23 May 1318. She married John before 25 Dec 1327. He was a Knight and 3rd Lord Bardolf, of Wormegay, Cantley, Caistor, Fincham, etc. He was the son and heir of Thomas Bardolf, Knight and 2nd Lord Bardolf and was born 13 Jan 1313/14 (aged 40 in 1357).

They had one son, William, 4th Lord Bardolf; and two daughters Isabel and Agnes.

Sir John died testate at Assisi, Italy, 29 July 1363, Elizabeth predeceased him.

20. William Bardolf and Agnes Poynings or Poynges

He was born 21 Oct 1349 and became Knight, 4th Lord Bardolf of Wormegay, Caister, Cantley, Fincham, Stow Bardolf, and Strumpshaw, Norfolk; Ruskington, Caythorpe, Digby, Fillingham, and Westborough, Lincolnshire; Clopton, Suffolk; Addington, Surrey; Plumpton, Sussex, etc. He was the son and heir. He married Agnes after 10 Feb 1365/67; she was the daughter of Michael de Poynings, Knight, 1st Lord Poynings by his wife Joan.

William and Agnes had these children: Thomas Bardolf, Knight and 5th Lord Bardolf (m. Amice or Avice Cromwell); William Bardolf, Knight, (m. Joan ____); Elizabeth Bardolf (m. Robert Scales and then Henry Percy of Atholl (descendant of Henry III and King Edward I, and King John); and Cecily.

Agnes was a legatee in the 1369 will of her mother Joan, Lady Poynings, and in the 1374 will of her brother Thomas de Poynings, 2nd Lord Poynings.

William died 29 Jan 1385/86. He left a will dated 12 Sept 1385, requesting burial in the quire of the church of the Friar Carmelites at Lynn, Norfolk.

His widow married shortly after 10 Apr 1386 Thomas Mortimer, Knight. He was prominent is English society, but they had no issue. He died before 14 Mar 1402/03.

Agnes died 12 June 1403 and was buried in Trinity Priory, Aldgate, London. She left a will dated 9 Jan 1402/03, proved 13 June 1403.

21. Cecily Bardolf and Brian Stapleton

She married Brian Stapleton, Knight, de jure Lord Ingham, of Ingham, Norfolk, North Moreton, Berkshire, Codford, Langford, and West Dean, Wiltshire, Bedale, Yorkshire, etc. He was sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, 1424-26; Knight of the Shire for Yorkshire, 1436-37; son and heir of Miles, Knight, de jure Lord Ingham of Ingham, Norfolk, Bedale, Yorkshire etc. by Ela, daughter of Edmund de Ufford, Knight. Brian was born about 1379 (aged 40 in 1419).

They had two sons: Miles, Knight; and Brian, Esq. (married Isabel ___); and one daughter: Anne, wife of Thomas Hethe and Walter Trumpington, Knight. Brian and Cecily were legatees in the 1414 will of his father, Miles Stapleton.

Cecily died 29 Sep 1432. He died 7 Aug 1438. He left a will dated 5 Apr 1438, codicil dated 4 May 1438. He and his wife Cecily were buried in the chancel at Ingham, Norfolk.

22. Miles Stapleton and Katherine de la Pole

He was born about 1408 (aged 40 in 1438). He was Knight, de jure Lord Ingham, of Ingham, Norfolk, North Moreton, Berkshire, Weybread, Suffolk, Codford, Langford, and West Dean, Wiltshire, Bedale, Yorkshire, etc. Knight of the Shire for Suffolk, Knight of the Shire for Norfolk and Suffolk, 1439-40.

He married (1) before 18 Nov 1424 (date of license to grant lands) Elizabeth Felbrigg, daughter of Simon Felbrigg, Knight of the Garter of Felbrigg, Norfolk, by his first wife Margaret, daughter of Przemyslaw Noszak, Duke of Teschen and Glogau. They had no issue.

He married (2) Katherine de la Pole, daughter of Thomas de la Pole, Knight, of Marsh (in Marsh Gibbon), Buckinghamshire, Grafton Regis, Northamptonshire, Norton sub Harndon, Somerset, etc. by his second wife Anne, daughter of Nicholas Cheyne.

Katherine was born about 1416 (aged 14 in 1430) and was heiress in 1430 to her brother, Thomas de la Pole. They had two daughters: Elizabeth and Joan (or Jane).

Miles was a legatee in the will of his father Brian Stapleton, Knight. He achieved honors from the Privy Council in 1443.

Miles died 1 Oct 1466 and was buried in front of the high altar at Ingham, Norfolk. He left a will dated 4 Aug 1442, codicil dated 18 Sep 1466, and proved 31 Dec 1466.

His widow married (2) before Easter term 1470 (date of lawsuit) as his 3rd wife Richard Harcourt, Knight, of Witham, Berkshire; Minister Lovel and Cornbury, Oxfordshire, London, and Corfe Mullen in Surminster Marshall, Dorset, Knight of the Shire of Oxfordshire, 1445-46, 1460-61, 1478, Sheriff of Oxfordshire and Berkshire 1460-61 and 1466-67, Knight of the Shire for Norfolk, 1472-75; King’s Esquire.

Richard died 1 Oct 1486. He left a will proved 25 Oct 1486, requesting burial in Abingdon Abbey, Oxfordshire. His widow Katherine died 13 or 14 Oct 1488 and was buried in Rowley Abbey, Oxfordshire. She left a will dated 7 July and 5 Sep 1488 and it was proved 23 Jan 1488/89.

23. Elizabeth Stapleton and William Calthorpe

She was born about 1441 or 1442 (aged 25 in 1466). She married (1) before 7 Mar 1463/4 as his second wife William Calthorpe, Knight, of Burham Thorpe and Norwich, and in right of his second wife of Ingham, Norfolk; and Northmoreton, Berkshire; sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, 1441-42, 1458-59, , 1463-64, 1475-76. He was the son and heir of John Calthorpe, Knight, of Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk by Anne, daughter of John Wythe, Knight.

William was born at Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk 30 Jan 1409/10. Elizabeth Stapleton and William Calthorpe had three sons:  Edward; Francis, Knight; and John; and two daughters: Ann, wife of Robert Drury; and Elizabeth, wife of Francis Hasilden, Esq. of Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire.

William had married (1) Elizabeth Grey (died 1437), daughter of Reynold Grey, Knight, Lord of Hastings, Wexford, and Ruthin. They had two sons: John, Knight, and William; one daughter: Anne, wife of William Gurney.

William died at Norwich, Norfolk 15 Nov 1494. He left a will dated 31 May 1494, which was proved 23 May 1495, requesting burial in the white Friars, Norwich, Norfolk.

Elizabeth married a second time to John Fortescue, Knight, of Ponsbourne, Hertfordshire, Chief Butler of England. He died 28 July 1500.

She married (3) Lord Edward Howard, Earl Marshal of England, Lord High Treasurer by his first wife Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Frederick Tilney, Esq. Edward was slain off Brest 25 Apr 1513.

Elizabeth died 18 Feb 1504/05.

24. Anne Calthorpe and Robert Drury

Ann married before 1494 as his first wife Robert Drury (born before 1456), Knight, of Hawstead, Suffolk. He was Knight of the Body of Kings Henry VII and Henry VIII; Knight of the shire for Suffolk; Speaker of the House of Commons; Privy Councilor. He was son and heir of Robert Drury, Esq. of Hawstead, Suffolk by his second wife Felice, daughter and heiress of William Denston.

They had two sons: William, Knight, and Robert, Knight; and four daughters: Anne; Elizabeth, wife of Philip Botelier, Knight; Bridget, wife of John Jernegan, Knight; Ursula, wife of Giles Allington, Knight.

Robert was admitted to Lincoln’s Inn in 1473. Anne was named in the 1494 will of her father. He was legatee of Ellesmere Chaucer, which bears his signature of Robert Drury on the flyleaf from John de Vere, Earl of Oxford. He attended the King at the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520.

Sir Robert died 2 Mar 1535/6 and was buried with his first wife at St. Mary’s, Bury St. Edmund’s Suffolk. He left a will proved 8 Feb. 1535/36.

His widow Anne married before 1543 Edmund Walsingham, Knight, who died 10 Feb. 1550 of Scadbury in Chislehurst, Kent, Lord Lieutenant of the Tower of London.

Anne, Lady Grey, left a will dated 1 Mar 1558 that was proved 8 May 1558.

25. Anne Drury and George Waldegrave

It is hard to know when these people transitioned from the top-level aristocracy to below, but by now we are in the gentry class, who were still better off than the average man at this time.

He was born about 1483 (aged 44 in 1527) of of Smallbridge in Bures St. Mary and Lindsay, Suffolk, Wormingford Hall in Wormingford, Essex, etc. He was an Esquire. He was son and heir to William Waldegrave. George and Ann had these children: William, Edward, and Phyllis.

He died 8 July 1528 and was buried at Bures St. Mary, Suffolk. He left a will that was proved 25 Aug 1528.

His widow Ann married (2) to Thomas Jermyn, a Knight of Rushbrook, sheriffs of Counties Norfolk and Suffolk. They had two sons John, Esq., and Thomas.

26. Edward Waldegrave (or Walgrave) and Joan Acworth or Ackworth

He was of Rivers Hall in Boxted, later of Lawford Hall, Essex. He was the third son, born about 1514.

In Dec 1541 Edward Waldegrave, with many others, including his future wife, were indicted with the trial for adultery of Katherine Howard, Queen of King Henry VIII. His offense was “withholding from his Majesty the King knowledge of certain letters which have been confiscated from a chest.”

He was confined in the Tower during the trial, received a sentence of life imprisonment, but was later pardoned.

He married between May and June 1556 Joan Acworth or Ackworth, widow of William Bulmer, daughter of ____, Wilberforce, Esq. She was born about 1519. They had one son: Edward; and four daughters: Mary, wife of Isaac Astley, Esq.; Anne, wife of Humphrey Monoux, Esq.; Bridget, wife of Thomas Kighley; and Margery (see next).

Edward died 13 Aug 1584. He left a will dated 12 Aug 1584, proved 5 Dec 1584. His widow Joan was buried 10 Dec 1590. They were both buried at Lawford, Essex.

27. Margery Waldegrave and William Clopton

She married William Clopton, Esq., of Castelyn in Groton, Suffolk, and Ramsden and Belhouse, Essex, son of Richard Clopton of Ford Hall in Long Melford and Castelyns in Groton, Suffolk by his second wife, Margery, daughter of William Playters (sic), Esq.

They had four sons: William, Esq.; Walter, Gentleman (see next); Waldegrave; and Thomas; and six daughters: Anne, wife of John Maidstone; Bridget, wife of John Sampson, Esq.; Thomasine; Mary, wife of George Jenney, Gentleman; Margery, wife of Thomas Doggett, Gentleman; and Elizabeth, wife of George Crocke.

His wife, Margery, was a legatee in the 1584 will of her father, Edward Waldegrave, Esq.

William died 9 Aug 1616 and was buried at Groton, Suffolk. He left a will proved 28 Nov 1616.

28. Walter Clopton and Margaret Maidstone

Second son, he was baptized 30 June 1585 at Groton, Suffolk and was from Boxted, Essex. He married at Boxted, Essex 21 Apr 1612 Margaret Maidstone, daughter of Robert Maidstone, Gentleman, of Great Horkesley, Essex.

They had two sons: Rev. William and Walter; and one daughter: Margaret.

Walter left a will dated 24 Dec 1622.

His widow married (2) by settlement dated 16 Aug 1631 Robert Crane, Gentleman, of Coggeshall, Essex, grocer. He was living in May 1645. His wife Margaret died in 1666.

29. Rev. William Clopton and Elizabeth Sutcliffe

He was baptized at Boxted, Essex, on 19 Apr 1613. He attended Emmanuel College, Cambridge University, receiving a B.A. in 1634 and M.A. in 1637. He was rector of Much Horksley, Essex, then in 1654 Rector at All Saints, Rettendon, Essex.

He married Elizabeth Sutcliffe, daughter of Rev. Isaiah Suttcliffe of Rettendon, Essex, by Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Thomas Jolye. They had one son, William, Gentleman.

They were part of the manor of Eastwoodbury after his mother’s death. He was ejected “for conscience sake” in 1662 and thereafter resided at or near Eastwood, Essex. Rev. Clopton left a will dated 24 Oct. 1670, which was proved 14 June 1671.

His widow, Elizabeth, died at Paglesham, Essex, in 1683.

Clopton arms: Sable a bend silver cotised dancetty gold.

AMERICAN MERITOCRACY

Our American forebears worked hard to make it

We don’t have a European-style aristocracy over here in America, but a meritocracy. People advanced by their hard work and merit. They had to earn it.

Let’s pick up from no. 29.

30. William Clopton and Ann Booth

Her father Robert Booth was a cofounder of Jamestowne.

31. Walter Clopton and Mary Jarratt

32. William Clopton and Cassandra Crump

33. Mary Clopton and William Perrin

34. Rebecca Perrin and Robert Anderson

35. Elizabeth Ann Anderson and Champion Wilbourn

36. Amonet Washington Wilbourn and Margaret Nancy Gray

37. William Harvey Wilbourn and Frances Victoria Daniel

40. Ella Washington (Rae) Wilbourn and Frank Rucker Ryland (our grandparents)

ARTICLES IN THE SERIES

1. From the Plantagenets to the Present Day

2.. From the Normans to the Present Day

3.. From the Capetians to the Present Day

4.. From Charlemagne to the Present Day

ANOTHER GENEALOGICAL PATH

From Charlemagne to the Dukes and Counts of Aquitaine to Eleanor of Aquitaine

I have not studied this path, but here are two tables from credentialed Medievalists.

The first one comes from Marios Costambeys, Matthew Innes, and Simon MacLean. It says that Rotrude is the daughter of Louis Pious, Charlemagne’s son. She married Gerard or Gerald, the first in the line of the dukes of Aquitaine.

Bottom row, center-left: Online genealogists say that Rotrud (Rotrude) married Geraud or Gerard in the next table.

Alienor is Eleanor in French. She is at the bottom left who married (1) Louis VII roi / king of France and (2) Henri or Henry II, roi or king of England; Key: fondateur = founder; dit = said or called; Guillaume = William; duc = duke; comte = count; Rannoux can be Ranulf; Eudes = Odo; Hugues = Hugh; NOTE: Hugues / Hugh Capet is the father of Robert II, the Pious (see his table, below, under Warren’s tables)

Source: Jaquette Luquet-Juillet

Note: On the right under Guillaume / William III is Adele of Normandy. She is the daughter of Rolf, the original Viking, who made a deal with Charles the Simple, descendant of Charlemagne. Charles discovered it was better to settle Rolf in his own territory, about where Normandy is today, than to fight him.

Rolf’s Latinized name is Rollo. He is the great-great-great-grandfather of William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy and King of England. Rolf is the founder of the House of Normandy or the Normans.

Here’s a shorter version, with Bouchard’s table (above and Ralph V. Turner’s table. They track things a little differently, but they converge on William V, the Great.

So Eleanor descends from Charlemagne through the counts and dukes of Aquitaine. She married Henry II, the first Plantagenet.

SUMMARY OF DOUGLAS RICHARDSON’S LINES

This section is taken from his five-volume work Royal Ancestry. I turned the French and other foreign names into standard English versions, for example, Heribert to Herbert or Geoffroi to Geoffrey or Baudouin to Baldwin or Thibaut to Theobald. Also, Medievalists today usually seem to use the name Matilda first and Maud as an alternative.

Line A:

This line follows Michael Allen’s Table 8.

Charlemagne, Emperor, married Hildegard

Pippin (Pépin) King of Italy, by a mistress ____

Bernard, King of Italy, married Cunegonde

Pippin (Pépin) Count near Paris married

Herbert I Count of Vermandois and Soissons married ____.

Herbert II, Count of Meaux, Soissons, and Vermandois, married ____ of France [my own research says she was Adele or Adela, daughter of Robert, king of west Francia]

Robert, Count of Troyes and Meaux married Adelaide (or Werra) of Burgundy

Adele of Troyes married Geoffrey I Grisegonelle, Count of Anjou

Ermengard of Anjou married Conan I, Duke of Normandy

Judith of Brittany married Richard II, Duke of Normandy

Robert I, the Magnificent, Duke of Normandy, by his mistress Arlette (Herleve or Herleva)

William the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England, married Matilda of Flanders.

Line B:

Charlemagne, Emperor, married Hildegard

Louis the Pious, Emperor, married Judith of Altorf

Charles II, the Bald, Emperor, married Ermentrude of Orleans

Judith of France married Baldwin I (Baudouin) Bras de Fer (Ironarm)

Baldwin II, the Bald, married AEfthryth (or Elstrude) of Wessex

Arnulf the Great or the Old married Adele de Vermanodois

Baldwin (Baudouin) III married Mathilde of Saxony

Arnulf II the Young married Suzanne (or Rozala) of Italy

Baldwin IV the Bearded married Otgive (or Ogive)

Baldwin V de l’Isle married Adele of France

Matilda of Flanders marred William I, the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England

Line C:

Charlemagne, Emperor, married Hildegard

Louis the Pious, Emperor, married Ermengarde of Haspengau

Lothar I, Emperor, married Ermengarde of of Tours

Lothar II, King of Lorraine, married Waldrade ____

Bertha married Theobald (Thibaud), Count of Arles

Boso, Count of Avignon and Arles, Margrave of Tuscany, married Willa ___

Willa of Arles married Berengar II, Margrave of Ivrea, King of Italy

Suzanne (or Rozala) of Italy married Arnulf II, Marquis of Flanders

Baudouin IV the Bearded married Otgive (or Ogive)

Baudouin V, de l’Isle marred Adele of France

Matilda of Flanders married William I, the Conqueror, duke of Normandy, King of England

Line D:

Charlemagne, Emperor, married Hildegard

Louis the Pious, Emperor, married Judith of Altorf

Gisela marred Eberhard, Margrave of Friuli

Berengar I, Emperor, married Bertila of Spoleto

Gisela of Italy married Adalberto, Margrave of Ivrea

Berengar II, King of Italy, married Willa of Arles

Rozala (Suzanne) of Italy married Arnulf II, Marquis of Flanders

Baldwin IV the Bearded married Otgive (or Ogive)

Baldwin V de l’Isle married Adele of France

Matilda of Flanders married William I, the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England

Line E:

Charlemagne, Emperor, married Hildegard

Louis the Pious, Emperor, married Judith of Altorf

Charles II the Bald, Emperor, married Ermentrude of Orleans

Louis II the Stammerer, King of France, married Adelaide

Ermentrude married ___

Cunegonde (or Kunigund) married Wigeric (Wigerch), Count of Palatine of Lotharingia, Count of the Bidgau

Sigefroid (or Siegfried, Sigebert), Count of Moselgau, married Hedwig ___

Otgive (or Ogive) married Baudouin, Count of-Marquis of Flanders

Baldwin V de l’Isle married Adele of France

Matilda of Flanders married William I, the Conqueror, Duke of Normandy, King of England

RELATED

William Clopton and Our Royal Heritage (another path to Medieval royalty)

William Longsword and Life in the Medieval Age and His American Descendants

Royal gateway ancestors of the Northeast

Royal gateway ancestors of the Middle Colonies

Royal gateway ancestors of Virginia

SOURCES

Matthias Becher, Charlemagne, trans. David S. Bachrach (New Haven: Yale UP, 1999, 2003).

Tracy Borman, Queen of the Conqueror: The Life of Matilda, Wife of William (Bantam, 2011).

Constance B. Bouchard, “The Origins of the French Nobility: A Reassessment.” The American Historical Review vol. 86, no. 1, Feb 1981, 501-32.

—, Those of My Blood: Constructing Noble Families in Medieval Francia (U Penn P 2001)

Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: Kings of France (Continuum, 2007).

Marjorie Chibnall, The Normans (Blackwell, 2000).

Marios Costambeys, Matthew Innes, and Simon MacLean, the Carolingian World (Cambridge UP, 2011).

David Crouch, The Normans: The History of the Dynasty (Hambledon and London, 2002).

David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror: The Norman Impact upon England (UC P, 1964).

Ivan Gobry, Robert II: Fils de Hugues Capet, Histoire des Rois de France (Pygmalion, 2005).

C. Warren Hollister and Amanda Clark Frost, Henry I, Yale English Monarchs (Yale UP, 2001).

Margaret Howell, Eleanor of Provence: Queenship in Thirteenth-Century England (Blackwell, 1998, 2001).

Dan Jones, The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England (Penguin, 2012).

Jacquette Luquet-Juillet, Occitanie: Terre de fatalité, Tome 1: Seigneurs et Peuples (Paris: Editions Dervy, 1997).

Medieval France: An Encyclopedia, eds. William W. Kibler and Grover A. Zinn (New York: Garland, 1995).

John Carmi Parsons, Eleanor of Castile: Queen and Society in Thirteenth-Century England (St. Martin’s, 1995, 1998).

Michael Prestwich, Edward I, new ed. Yale Monarch series (Yale UP, 1997).

Pierre Riché, The Carolingians: A Family Who Forged Europe, trans. Michael Idormir Allen (U Penn P, 1993).

Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 5 volumes (Salt Lake: Published Privately, 2013).

W. L. Warren, King John, Yale Monarchs (Yale UP, 1961, 1978).

—. Warren, Henry II (Berkeley: University of California P, 1973).

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