Plato the Soul Man

This short post presents his basic arguments for the existence of the soul. Good for a quick review.

Without much commentary, here are the arguments, boiled down.

1.. All users differ from the things used.

2. Man is the user of his body.

3. Therefore, Man differs from his body.

 

1.. Man is a soul or a body (brain) or a union of the two.

2. Man is not the body and not the union of the two.

3. Therefore, Man is a soul.

 

1.. All souls that live in the body are deceived and are hindered from receiving the truth.

2. Your soul lives in the body.

3. Therefore, your soul is deceived and is hindered from receiving the truth.

 

1.. Every “embodied” soul that escapes from the body receives the truth.

2. A soul escapes from the body upon the body’s death.

3. Therefore, every “disembodied” soul receives the truth.

 

1.. Back to the present life: every embodied soul that is least concerned for the body makes the nearest approach to knowledge and the truth.

2. Describe that soul which is least concerned for the body—Plato describes it

3. Therefore, it is this soul that makes the nearest approach to knowledge and truth.

 

1.. All things that order and rule over natural things are close to divinity (are divine).

2. The soul orders and rules over the body (a natural thing).

3. Therefore, the soul is close to divinity (is divine).

 

1.. All divine things are immortal, intelligible, uniform, indissoluble, and unchangeable (immutable).

2. To repeat, the soul is in the “very likeness” of a divine thing.

3. Therefore, the soul is immortal, intelligible, uniform, indissoluble, and unchangeable 1.. (immutable).

RELATED

Outline of Plato’s View of Justice and the Soul

ARTICLES IN OUTLINE SERIES (alphabetical order)

Aristotle’s Virtue Ethics

Clifford’s Ethics of Belief

Descartes’s Mind-Body Separation (Meditations I and II)

Hick’s Evil and God of Love

Hume’s Argument against Design

Hume’s Theory of Knowledge

James’s Will to Believe

Kant’s Ethics

Locke’s Theory of Knowledge

Mill’s Utilitarian Ethics

Nietzsche’s “Death of God”

Paley’s Watchmaker Design Argument

Plato’s View of Justice and the Soul

Plato the Soul Man

Rachels’s Moral Objectivism

Ryle’s Category Mistake

Sartre’s “Existentialism and Humanism”

Socrates’s “Apology”

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