Robert Booth and Jamestowne Society

He arrived in Jamestowne perhaps in or before 1638 and died in 1657. He served in the Virginia House of Burgesses.

Dr. Robert Booth is one of the Jamestowne founders; if you want, you might be able to join the Jamestown Society through him, as any of your family lines link up with his.

He served in the House of Burgesses in 1652 and 1653 and 1654 and 1655 (York Co.). See this link:

Members of the Virginia House of Burgesses, 1619 to 1660.

For us, the generational chain works out like this:

Dr. Robert Booth → Ann Booth (1) m. Thomas Dennett and then (2) m. William CloptonWalter CloptonWilliamMary m. William PerrinRebecca m. Robert AndersonElizabeth Ann m. Champion WilbournAmonetWilliamElla Washington (Rae) (our grandmother), a Wilbourn

Let’s begin with Dr. Booth and track those links in the chain, from one generation to the next.

And one last word: Don’t worry about inconsistent spelling; that’s just what clerks did back then. As long as they were “in the ballpark,” they must have felt it was all right.

ROBERT BOOTH

We don’t know when he arrived in Jamestowne, but his patent was dated in January 1646. One researcher says he moved there in 1645. By 1651 he patented 800 acres of land on the west side of Skimino Cr. fronting York R. in York County. In July 1652 he received two patents, 400 acres each, on the lower side of Queen’s Cr. in York County. A year later he successfully laid claim to an 880 acre track to the southeast of Old Warrany Indian Town, then in York County. In 1654 he brought a suit against a man living in Northumberland County. He served in the House of Burgesses for York County, in 1653 and 1654-1655. He served as a justice in York County court., He died before October 26, 1657, when his relict Frances relinquished her right to land some land.

In Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, abstracted by Nell Marion Nugent, vol. 1 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1991), p. 95, Robert Booth’s land is mentioned in a patent for William Watts and Richard Davis, dated 30 July 1638. Booth’s land borders theirs upon Queen’s Cr. Leift. (Lt.) Popely’s land figures in the patent, as well. So we can say Robert Booth owned land by 30 July 1638, and it is probable that he lived there as well.

Therefore, Robert Booth arrived in Virginia in or before July 30, 1638.

There are several Booths who arrived in Jamestowne before he did: (1) unnamed Booth arrived in 1608, in the first supply; (2) Henry: officials back in England decided he should be sent to the New World in 1619; he was living in a 1624 census; (3) John Booth, a laborer, arrived in first supply in 1608 (probably the unnamed Booth, no. 1); (4) John Booth was a member of Ensign Spence’s household, and he died between April 1623 and February 16, 1624; (5) Reynolds Booth arrived in Virginia in 1609 and lived in Jamestowne, and he returned to England, and in 1620 he testified how Africans were captured and brought to Jamestowne in 1619; in 1624 he and his wife Elizabeth and daughter Mary were living in Elizabeth City.

It is very likely, with such a small population in the area at the time, that Dr. Booth was related to one of these early Booths, but so far no document has turned up proving the connection.

Source for the above information, other than the 1638 patent: Martha W. McCartney, Jamestowne People to 1800: Landowners, Public Officials, Minorities, and Native Leaders (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 2012), pp. 76-77.

November 11, 1672

Dr. Booth did not leave behind probate records, so we have to prove in a roundabout way that Anne (our direct line) is his daughter.

This record shows his son is Robert Booth. Other records will show Robert Jr.’s sister is Anne.

Ordered that Robert Booth, son and heir of Robert Booth, decd., patent in his own name, one thousand acres of land in New Kent County, formerly granted to and seated to the said Robt. Both, decd.; this grant to produce no better right if any hereafter appears.

Source: H. R. McIlwaine, ed. Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, 1622-1632 and 1670-1676 (Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1934), p. 322.

January 23, 1683/4

… And further I the said William [Clopton] do hereby nominate, constitute, and appoint my well-beloved brother[-in-law], Mr. Robt. Booth, foefee in trust to see the true performance of this my deed of gift …. Twenty third day of January in the year of our Lord 1683/4.

Source: Lucy Erwin, The Ancestry of William Clopton, of York County, Virginia, (Rutland, VT: Tuttle Publishing, 1939), p. 134.

Actually, Dr. Booth died before October 26, 1657 and left no will, so his wife Frances is granted letters of administration. We believe he died young, and the cause of death is unknown.

Source: Lindsay O. Duvall, York Co. Book III, Wills, Deeds, and Orders, Pages 5-60, 1657-1659, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Series 2, Vol. 5, (Wharton Grove, VA, 1961), p. 9.

ANNE BOOTH DENNETT CLOPTON

Anne Booth first married Thomas Dennett; then she married William Clopton (our direct line).

April 22, 1673

In York County, on page one of the abstract of Thomas Dennett’s Will, Thomas names his wife Ann and son John (and daughters Eleanor Dennett, Anne and Sarah); he appoints his loving brothers[-in-law] John Baskerville and Mr. Robt. Booth to oversee his will.

It was recorded 25 August 1673, so Thomas died between those dates.

Source: Bruce Weisiger, York County, Virginia Records: 1672-1676 (Privately Published, 1991)

April 24, 1683

Elizabeth Cole, servant to Mr. William Clopton, coming from Otho Thorpe and Samuel Thympson [Thompson], two of his Majesty’s justices of the peace, this 28th day of March 1683, saith that on the 36th day of February, last, in the house of the said Mr. Wm. Clopton, did hear Jno. Dennett, son of the said Clopton’s wife, say that there was no justice done at York Court, this day ….

John Dennett is a son of William Clopton’s wife Ann, proving she was previously married to a Dennett, that is, Thomas Dennett, and she is now married to William Clopton.

Source: Lucy Erwin, The Ancestry of William Clopton of York County, Virginia (Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle, 1939), p. 135.

December 27, 1689 and January 24, 1689/90

In York County, VA, two deed records show that Ann Booth Dennett is now married to William Clopton, and they are relinquishing their right to land to John Dennett, her son by her first husband, without demanding payment. Though the two abstracts do not state explicitly that Ann and John Dennett are mother and son, this record confirms it by strongly probable circumstantial evidence, confirmed by the earlier record transcribed by Erwin (see above). Robert Booth is acting as an attorney.

Source: John F. Dorman, York County, Virginia, Deeds, Orders, Wills, etc. no. 8, 1687-1691 (Washington, D.C. 1975), p. 37.

March 4, 1716

In New Kent County, VA, Ann Clopton, wife of Mr. William Clopton, departed this life.

Source: C. G. Chamberlayne, The Vestry Book and Register of St. Peter’s Parish: New Kent and James City Counties, Virginia, 1684-1786, 3rd Reprint Edition (Richmond: Library of Virginia, 1997), p. 57.

Transcription of the gravestone:

St. Peter’s Church

Here Lyeth the Body of

Anne Clopton

The wife of William Clopton of the

County of New Kent. She departed

This Life the 4th day of March anno Domini 1716

In the 70th year of her Age

She left three Sons & two Daughters

By her said Husband, viz:

Robert William Walter Anne & Elizabeth

Source: William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, vol. 5, no. 2, October 1896.

WALTER CLOPTON

Lucy Erwin’s book, The Ancestry of William Clopton of York County, Virginia (Rutland, Vermont: Tuttle, 1939), p. 140, states that Walter is the son of William, but let’s provide more evidence beyond the book and Anne’s gravestone. Also, we need to show Walter has a son named William.

December 20, 1722 and September 30, 1732

In New Kent County, VA: we have father (Walter) and son (William) at the same church meeting, though the record does not say “father” and “son.” But the fact is, there are no other possibilities–two generations.

Source: The Vestry Book of St. Peter’s, New Kent County, VA, the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia, Parish Record Series no. 3 (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, 1905), p. 136.

September 4, 1711

In New Kent County, VA, Walter Clopton marries Mary Jarratt.

In the same marriage records, Walter’s two brothers Robert married Sarah Scott on 18 Dec. 1711; and William Clopton, Jr. married Joice Wilkinson on 27 Jan. 1718. These two names confirm Ann Clopton’s tombstone engraving.

Source: C. G. Chamberlayne, The Vestry Book and Register of St. Peter’s Parish: New Kent and James City Counties, Virginia, 1684-1786, 3rd Reprint Edition (Richmond: Library of Virginia, 1997), p. 47.

WILLIAM CLOPTON

Lucy Erwin’s book The Ancestry of William Clopton of York County, Virginia (Rutland, VT: Tuttle, 1939), p. 146, states William is the son of Walter, but let’s provide more evidence.

December 19, 1714

In New Kent County, VA, William Clopton is born on that date. The edge of the pages was eaten through, so the name is blank. No researcher doubts this is William, but circumstantial evidence is provided, next.

Source: C. G. Chamberlayne, The Vestry Book and Register of St. Peter’s Parish: New Kent and James City Counties, Virginia, 1684-1786, 3rd Reprint Edition (Richmond: Library of Virginia, 1997), p. 6.

August 30, 1727

In New Kent County, VA, Devereux is born to Walter Clopton. This record supports the evidence that William was also born to Walter because of the next record too; all of them lived in St. Peter’s Parish.

Source: The Parish Register Book of St. Peter’s, New Kent County, VA, the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia, Parish Record Series no. 3 (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, 1905), p. 82.

August 24, 1751

New Kent County, VA: In the list of precinct leaders, Walter (no. 4), William Clopton (no. 8) and Devereux Clopton (no. 11) are named. Walter married into the Jarrett family. William probably married into the Crump family (Cassandra, after whom they named a daughter). Their in-laws–the Jarratts, Crumps–are also precinct leaders in the same precinct. The next record show Devereux is a son of Walter. Recall the Cloptons are the only family of that name in the parish.

Source: The Parish Register Book of St. Peter’s, New Kent County, VA, the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia, Parish Record Series no. 3 (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, 1905), p. 217.

MARY CLOPTON

She is the daughter of William Clopton and mother of Rebecca (next).

November 13, 1737 and January 5, 1737

In New Kent County, VA, 13 Nov. and 5 Jan. 1737: Mary Clopton is born and baptized to Walter and Cassandra Clopton.

Source: The Parish Register Book of St. Peter’s, New Kent County, VA, the National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia, Parish Record Series no. 3 (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, 1905), p. 131.

Date Unknown

Mary marries William Perrin.

Under no. 27, footnote no. 5, Lucy Erwin cites a primary source for the marriage between Mary Clopton and William Perrin: a Perrin Family Bible. I have looked for it in various libraries in Virginia and the Virginia Historical Society, but cannot find it. It must be in a private collection. But there is another way to confirm the Bible record: Did William marry a Mary, George marry a Catherine (Caty), and Josephus marry a Cassandra?

Source: Lucy Erwin, The Ancestry of William Clopton of York County, Virginia (Rutland, VT: Tuttle, 1939), p. 146.

May 2, 1772

In Charlotte County, VA, Mary signs her dower relinquishment, confirming Lucy Erwin’s evidence from the Perrin Bible Record that this is Mary Clopton who married William Perrin.

Source: Charlotte County, Virginia Deeds, 1771-1777 (Miami Beach: TLC Genealogy, 1991), p. 20.

October 15, 1793

In Lincoln County, KY, Cassandra is named as Josephus’s wife and relict.

Source: Betty Cummings Cook, Lincoln County, Kentucky Records, vol. III (Evansville, IN: Cook), p. 84.

This is one more confirmation that Lucy Erwin’s claim that Josephus married Cassandra is correct.

May 10, 1797

In Edgefield District, SC, the will of George Perrin confirms the Perrin Family Bible that says George married Catherine (Caty). And in addition to George marrying Caty, we also find that he moved to Edgefield, SC. Two brothers, William and George, moved there.

Sources: Will Book A, p. 128; Box 43, package 1798; and Frances Terry Ingmire, Edgefield County, South Carolina, Old Wills Book A-B 1787-1806, vol. 1 (St. Louis MO: published privately: 1982), pp. 97-98.

Therefore, Lucy Erwin’s Perrin Bible record is confirmed. Three Clopton sisters Mary, Catherine, and Cassandra married three Perrin brothers: William, George, and Josephus, respectively.

Now let’s return to Mary Clopton and William Perrin.

June 7, 1774

Mary Clopton and William Perrin move to Edgefield District, SC.

Glanville (later Edgefield) County, SC., patent nos. 30, 491: William Perrin owned land in the Hard Labour Cr. area; the purpose of this grant is to show that the Perrins, Andersons, and Wilbourns clustered together in the same area, so their offspring could meet and marry.

Source: Brent H. Holcomb, South Carolina Royal Grants, Volume Four: Grants 25 through 31, 1772-1775 (Columbia, SC: SCMAR, 2009)

September 21, 1783 and February 8, 1785

Transcription of William Perrin’s Will

William Perrin died between those two dates. Apparently his wife Mary predeceased him, since she is not named in the will. Their daughter Rebecca, highlighted, is our direct line.

Transcription begins:

William Perrin’s Last Will and Testament

In the name of God, Amen

I William Perrin of South Carolina in the District of Ninety-Six being sick and weak but perfect in mind and Memory do constitute and appoint this my last will and Testament in Manner and form following (viz) To Wit: That my Funeral [careted in: Expences] and Just debts be [careted in: first] paid

Item I give and bequeath to my eldest Son Abner all the land I possess on the East Side of Hardlabour Creek above the mile branch taking the branch before the line except fifty acres that lies on the New Road and also one Negro Man named Isaac when he shall come to the age of Twenty-one years and one fether Bed, to him and his heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Son Samuel all the Land I possess on the east of Hardlabour Creek below the mile branch, also one negro Boy Named Harry, also one Feather Bed when he [comes] to the age of Twenty one years or Married, to him his heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Son William all the Land I possess on the west side of Hardlabour Creek, also one Negro Girl named Lucyand also one Feather Bed when he comes to the age of twenty one years to him his heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Son George Henry fifty five acres of Land lying on the new Road and Two young Negroes Named Joe and Ned and one feather bed when he comes to the age of Twenty one years, to him, his heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Cassandra one Negro boy named Roberson, also one Feather bed to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Betty five shillings to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Mary one Negro girl Named Sarah, also one feather bed to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Rebecah Five Shillings Sterling to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Margaret one Negro boy Named Charles, also one feather bed and side saddle to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Sally one Negro Girl named Amea, also one feather Bed and side saddle to her and her heirs and assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Edna one Negro Girls named Suckey, also one feather bed and Side Saddle to her, her heirs and Assigns forever –

Item I give and bequeath to my Daughter Martha one Negro or sixty pounds sterling, also one feather bed and Side Saddle to her, her heirs and assigns forever –

It is my will and desire that the Estate may be kept Together Except the Legacies given to those Children are already come of age and that the Expences of my Children Schooling and living come out of the Estate and the profits thereof and at the Expiration of two years may be aloted off and sold such part of the Hold Goods and Stock as my Executors shall think proper, to be equally divided amongst all my Children, the Remaining part of my household Goods, Negroes and stock to continue on the Plantation where I now live to work it for those Children that live Single and Choose to Continue on it as long as my Executors shall think proper not exceeding eight Years

Item It is my Desire that if any of my Children Die before they are of Age or possessed of their Estate the Legacies to be Equally divided Amongst all my Children then alive; it is also my desire that any of the Negroes Given in the Legacies Should die before the Child is Possessed of it the Value thereof to be paid to be paid to the loosing [sic] Child out of the said Estate; And when my Executors shall think proper to dispose the Remaining Part of my Negroes the Money from thence arising to be equally divided Amongst all my Daughters, the Living and the Remaining part of this Estate to be equally Divided amongst all my Children then living

And Lastly I do constitute, nominate, and appoint Richard Tutt and my Son Abner Executors of this my last Will and Testament hereby Revoking all Other Wills heretofore named by me; I do order that [careted in: my Estate] be not appraised

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this Twenty first day of September one Thousand and eighty three

Signed, Sealed and Published and Declared by the Testator to be his Will and Testament in the presence of James Harrison, Johannes Christoph, J S Lentz, Thomas X Littleton

[Signed] William Perrin

South Carolina}

Ninety Six District} By John Thomas Jun’r Esquire Ordinary of the District aforesaid Personally appeared John Stephen Mantz [sic] one of the subscribing witnesses to the within will before me and made oath  that he saw William Perrin, Deceased, Sign, Seal and Publish pronounces and declares the same to be his last Will and Testament and that he was then of Sound and perfect mind, memory and Understanding to the best of the Deponent’s  knowledge & belief and that James Harrison and Thomas Littleton did sign their names thereto as Evidences in the presents [sic] of the Testator at his Request & in the Presents [sic] of each other, Given under may hand the 8th day of February AD 1785

Proved in open Court by the oath of Thomas Littleton 9th October 1787

South Carolina}

Edgefield County}

Clerk’s Office Recorded in Will Book A pages 1 & 2 October Term 1787 & Examined

[Signed] R Tutt, clk

Transcription ends.

Source: Will Book A, pages 1-2, Box 18, Package 664

REBECCA PERRIN

She married Robert Anderson. They had several children, one of whom is Betsey, our direct line.

March 25, 1790

In Edgefield District, pages 38-43 and Plat: Robert Anderson owned land on another Rocky Cr. that flows into Turkey Cr. His property is just south of Cuffeetown Cr. To the north as the crow flies lived the Wilbourns at Liberty Hill (see below).

In other words the Andersons and Wilbourns lived nearby, so they daughter and the Wilbourns had the chance to meet and marry.

Source: GE Lee Corley Hendrix, Edgefield County, South Carolina Abstracts of Deed Books 1-12, 1786-1796 (Greenville, SC: Southern Historical P, 1985), p. 127.

December 13, 1813

In Edgefield District, SC, An experienced researcher asks whether Rebecca Anderson signed any dower relinquishment sections, so her first name would appear with Robert. She did not. Robert did not get involved in many land deals. And she didn’t sign off on two deed deals because the land was going to her son.

Deed: Robert Anderson to his son John Anderson Jr., deed, for love and affection, 150 acres, part of 200 acres granted to Samuel Anderson, 23 June 1774, situate on road from Scott’s ferry on Savannah R. to Cambridge, adj. land of said Anderson, John Adams, and Robert Anderson; wit: Gabriel Williams and David Williams; signed Robert Anderson. (Deed Book 31, p. 483)

Deed: Robert Anderson to his son John Anderson, deed, natural love and affection, 35 acres being part of survey of 100 acres granted to Chambers Blakeley 13 Apr 1769 lying on road from Scott’s Ferry on Savannah R. to Cambridge and adj. aforesaid John Anderson, John Adams, and James Harrison, and Robert Anderson; wit: Gabriel Williams and David Williams; signed Robert Anderson (Deed Book 31, p. 484).

Source: Carol Wells, Edgefield County, South Carolina: Deed Books 30 and 31 (Heritage Books, 2007), p. 173.

Please see the post about the Andersons of Edgefield County, here:

https://liveasfreepeople.wordpress.com/2015/12/19/andersons-of-edgefield-district-sc/

December 17, 1808 and February 27, 1818

Robert Anderson’s Will

He died between those two dates.

Robert’s will is sloppy. Evidently he did not seek out an attorney. He does not name wife Rebecca, though she is living; he just calls her “my dearly loved wife.” But he does name his daughter Betsey.

Note the three Perrin boys, two of whom are Rebecca’s brothers, and one is her cousin (son of George Perrin) who signed the will.

Transcription begins:

I, Robert Anderson, being of sound disposing mind memory and understanding, Do make this my Last Will and Testament in manner and form following:

Immediately at my death my will and desire is that all my personal property go into the actual occupancy and possession of my wife

I give and bequeath to my dearly loved Wife two negroes, namely Cate and Fillida to her and her Heirs forever

I give and bequeath to my Daughter Betsey when she shall marry or come of age negro Tony, bed, and Furniture, Cow and calf Sow and pigs and thirty Dollars in money to her and her Heirs forever

I give and bequeath to my daughter Sally when she shall come of age or marry, negro named Rose, Bed and Furniture Cow and calf Sow and Pigs and thirty Dollars in money to her and her heirs forever

I give and bequeath to my daughter Martha Bowen Anderson negro named Tinah bed and furniture Cow and calf Sow and Pigs and thirty Dollars in money to her and her Heirs forever, when she shall marry or come of age

I give to my Son John negro named Sylvia Bed and furniture Cow and calf Sow and Pigs and thirty Dollars in Cash to him and his heirs forever, when he shall marry or come of age

In case __ then the above named and given negroes die before my said children come of age or marry then my will and desire that another negro of equal value or the amount in money at the discretion [of] my wife and Son named Executrix and Executor be given in lieu of the negro or negroes before given

All the Balance of property not before [word covered with tape] of is to remain with my wife during her natural wife [careted in: or widowhood] and at her death [careted in: or marriage] to be equally divided among all my children share and share alike to them and their Heirs forever

But the part of my personal property that shall fall to my daughter Mary married to Edward Belcher is to be at her disposal entirely and not controlled in any manner by her said Husband

My wife is to live on my Plantation and in my dwelling House during her natural life [careted in: or widowhood] and to have use and enjoy all my real estate during her life or widowhood and at her death or marriage the whole of my real estate to go to my Son John [to] him and his Heirs forever

I do hereby name, constitute and appoint my wife and son Executrix and Ex’or of this my last will and Testament

The words “or widowhood” and the words “or marriage” in the 8th line from the top on the second page put in by my consent and at my desire And also the words “or widowhood” in the sixteenth line of the same page

Given under my Hand and subscribed in the Presence of the witnesses whose names are hereunto annexed this Seventeenth day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and an eight, and of the American independence the thirty third [sic]

[signed]

Robert Anderson

Sam’l Perrin

Robt. Perrin

Abner Perrin

South Carolina }

Edgefield }

Personally appeared before me Abner Perrin who being duly sword doth make oath and say (that he saw Robert Anderson Sign Seal and declare the same to be and contain his last Will and testament) that he the said Robert Anderson was then of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding to the best of the deponent’s knowledge and belief and that he the said Abner Perrin together with Sam’l Perrin & Robert Perrin did Sign their Names as witnesses thereto at the request [careted in: of] the testator in his Presence at the same time Qualified John Anderson Ex’r to the written Given under my Hand at my office the 27 Feb’y 1818

Jn. Simkins

O.E.D.

Transcription ends.

Source:  Box 2, package 34, recorded in Will Book C, page 1.

ELIZABETH ANN (BETSEY) ANDERSON

She married Champion Wilbourn, who died young, but not before having three children with her. She was born around 1795, probably in Edgefield District, SC. She died before 1851, probably before the 1850 Census was taken, out in Louisana.

March 7, 1810

In Edgefield District, SC: in a deed record, her (future) father-in-law William Wilbourn lives at Liberty Hill. His will, next, says he is the father of Champion, who married Betsey Ann. Recall the patent of Robert Anderson’s land that shows Robert lived to the south (as the crow flies) of Cuffeetown Cr. and Liberty Hill, on Rocky Cr. that flows into Turkey Cr.

Thus the Anderson’s and Wilbourn’s properties were not far apart, so Champion Wilbourn and Betsey Anderson had a chance to meet and marry. (Deed Book 30, p. 136)

Source: Carol Wells, Edgefield County, South Carolina Deeds Books 30 and 31 (Westminster, MD: Heritage Books, 2007), p. 25.

March 3, 1827 and May 21, 1828

William Wilbourn’s Will

In Edgefield District, SC: William Wilbourn’s will says Betsey Ann married Champion Wilbourn (William’s son). John Anderson (Robert Anderson’s son named in his will) signed William’s will. Incidentally, E. B. Belcher is Edward (really Edmund), who married Mary Anderson, daughter of Robert Anderson and sister of John.

Transcription begins:

In the name of God Amen.  I William Wilborn of the District of Edgefield and State of South Carolina being in a low state of health but not as yet lost my usual reason and understanding and knowing that it is appointed for all men to die do make this my last will and testament, viz.  My wish and desire is that my Beloved wife Cary Wilborn do have the plantation and tract of land where on I now live which is the whole of my land and one half of the Mill on Cufferton Creek also all my stock of horses cattle hogs, &c one negro boy by the name of Key a woman by the name of Lucy and her three children all this property I give my wife during her natural life or widowhood and increase of either.  I wish the whole of the property sold on a credit of twelve months and equally divided among all my children including the Heirs of Champn [sic] Wilborn  I do also appoint Betsy Ann Wilborn guardian for the three children she has by my son Champion Wilborn my will and desire is that the whole of the rest of my property be sold immediately after my death on a credit of twelve months and after paying my just debts be equally divided between all my children, viz.  the heirs of Champin [sic] Wilborn Elizabeth Wilborn Peter H Wilborn Kitty Wilborn John Wilborn Geny Wilborn Mary Wilborn Dicy Wilborn and James Wilborn  and I do appoint my wife Cary Wilborn and my son Peter H Wilborn executors to this my last will and also appoint them guardians to the above last named five children 3rd day March 1827.

Signed sealed & delivered in the presents [sic]

William (X) Wilborn [his mark]

William Thurmond     

John Anderson

E. B. Belcher

Proved by the oath of John Anderson Witness to the written the 7th April 1828 same time qualified Peter H. Wilborn Exc

M Simkin[s]

O. E. D

Recorded by W. J. Simpkins the 21st May 1828

Transcription ends.

Sources: Will Book C, p. 362, Court of Equity no. 397

May 10, 1831

In Edgefield District, SC: William and Cairy Wilbourn’s son Peter initiated a lawsuit against his own mother, because Peter accused her of showing symptoms of distress and thus lowering the prices at the estate sale.

Of the many documents the suit generated, this reply by Cairy Wilbourn and daughter-in-law Elizabeth (Betsey) Ann Wilbourn names three generations: (1) Cairy Wilbourn and Rebecca Anderson; (2) Champion and Betsey Ann Wilbourn; and (3) Amonet Wilbourn. All of them are our direct line.

Transcription begins:

State of South Carolina

Edgefield District, ss

In Equity

The joint & separate answer of Carey Wilbourn & Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn to the Bill of Complaint of William Newman & Jane his wife.

These Defendants reserving to themselves all benefit of exceptions to said Bill; in answer to so much thereof as they are advised it is material for them to answer, answering say:  That William Wilbourn died on the 24 March 1828, leaving in full force, his last will & testament, by which he devised & bequeathed a considerable portion of his estate to his widow Carey Wilbourn for life, & directed the remainder to be sold by his executors on a credit of twelve months, & the proceeds after payment of his just debts, “to be equally divided between all his children viz the Heirs of Champion Wilbourn, Elizabeth Wilbourn, Peter H. Wilbourn, Kitty Wilbourn, John Wilbourn, Jeney Wilbourn, Mary Wilbourn, Dicey Wilbourn and James Wilbourn”.  It is submitted to the Court, whether by the proper construction of this clause, each of the children of Champion Wilbourn takes an equal share with the children of the Testator, or the whole representing their deceased father, takes but one of these equal shares.-  By this will Peter H. Wilbourn & your respondent Carey Wilbourn were appointed Executors, & they were also constituted Guardians of the five children of the Testator last named in the above recited clause, & your respondent Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn was appointed Guardian of William Wilbourn, Amonet Wilbourn, & Sarah Wilbourn, her children by her deceased husband Champion Wilbourn.

Your respondent Carey Wilbourn further answering says, That although she qualified as Executrix of said Will, she has had little concern in the management of the Estate, leaving the great burthen [sic] of the execution of the will to the said Peter H. Wilbourn, who has possession of all the papers, assets & vouchers of the estate except three receipts herein after mentioned.  The statement of her transaction on the estate is as follows:  She received from Rebecca Anderson $305, & from Beverly Burton $145; on their notes for property purchased at the Executors’ sale, & from William Minter $154 collected by him in Alabama on account of the Estate.  She paid E. B. Belcher, Sheriff of this District, $160, & $53.17, & Wm Minter $3 for debts due by the Estate & she is ready to produce the receipts for these payments.  All the balance of what she has received (except $63 for which she is ready to account) she paid & delivered over to Peter H. Wilbourn, her co-executor, partly in money & partly in demands against the Estate that she had paid and discharged:  which balance amounts to the sum of $324.83.  The said Peter H. Wilbourn at the time the money & receipts were handed over to him promised to include the same in his account current, but whether he has done so, your respondent is not informed.

Your respondent Carey Wilbourn further answering says, that a sale was had pursuant to the direction of the will, on the 15 December 1828, of the property not specifically bequeathed which appears by the copy of the return of sales filed with the answer of Peter H. Wilbourn to have amounted to the sum of $3868.25, but she does not perceive included in said return of sales two negroes Nice & Jim purchased by the said Peter H. Wilbourn for $300 or upwards.  At this sale your Respondent Carey Wilbourn purchased property to the amount of $1554.87½ (as it appears by a hasty calculation).  This sale so far as the Respondent was concerned was conducted with all possible fairness.  She enjoyed no advantages over other bidders- gave fair prices for what she purchased,- & was compelled to make the purchases for the proper maintenance of her younger children.

In relation to so much of the Bill as speaks of advancements to the children of the said William Wilbourn, the respondent Carey Wilbourn says, that she knows of no donations by the said William Wilbourn to his children by way of advancement, but certain property was placed in the possession of the two elder, i.e Champion, & Elizabeth, wife of Wm Webb, by way of loan from her late husband, & all that remained of it was returned to the Estate & sold by the Executors, except one mare, a cow & yearling & a bed & furniture of that which was lent to the said Wm Webb & his wife.  Shortly before the death of the Testator, viz about the 1 February 1828, he sold to William Webb a negro woman Tesh & her two children Nancy & Gilbert for the sum of $750; & this sum remained unpaid at Testator’s death, & probably is not yet entirely paid, yet the Respondent distinctly remembers to have seen William Webb pay, on this account, $70 to Peter H. Wilbourn as Executor.

The Respondent Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn further answering says: no advancements have been made to her or her children by the said William Wilbourn since the death of her husband Champion Wilbourn, but a loan was made by the said Testator to her husband in his lifetime of the negroes Nancy, Nice & Jim, a mare & colt some cattle & some household furniture, of which Nancy died in the lifetime of William Wilbourn, the mare & colt were taken back by Testator soon after the death of her said husband Champion Wilbourn, & all the remaining portion of said property was taken back by the Executors of said William Wilbourn after his death, & sold at the Sale.

Defendants deny all fraud & combination & pray to be dismissed hence with their costs &c.

Wardlaw & Wardlaw

Defts’ Solrs

South Carolina

Edgefield District

Carey Wilbourn & Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn being duly sworn depose that the matters & things in the Answer within, so far as they are stated in their own knowledge are true, & so far as stated on the information of others are believed by the Defendants to be true.

Sworn to before Me

May the 10 1831

[Signed] Cairy Wilbourn

Elizabeth A. Wilbourn

Peter Quattlebaum, J. P.

Transcription ends.

Source: Equity 397

There are other documents proving Rebecca Anderson and Betsey Wilbourn are mother and daughter, and Betsey is the mother of Amonett, but this document will have to suffice, for this post.

AMONETT WASHINGTON WILBOURN

His name could be spelled Amonet. We have not yet found out why they gave him this French name. He married Nancy Margaret Gray in about 1843. She was born January 1, 1827. She died May 7, 1904. He was born on November 7, 1827.

Betsey Ann Wilbourn and her three children moved to Bienville Parish, LA, in late 1836 or early 1837. Her husband Champion had already passed away in about 1827-1828 in Edgefield, SC. They were free to start a new life.

August 5, 1837

Bienville Parish, LA: Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church; Elizabeth Ann Wilbourn and her son Amonet joined this church (as do two other of her children: Sarah and William).

Source: Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church Louisiana, 1835-1864 (Shreveport: Shreve Memorial Library, n.d.), n.p.

December 5, 1889 and March 14, 1890

In Columbia County, Arkansas, Amonett Wilbourn died between those two dates. Family records say December 8, 1890.

W. H. (William Harvey) is our direct line.

Transcription begins:

Last Will & Testament of A. W. Wilburn

In the Name of God.  Amen

I A. W. Wilbourn of the County of Columbi[a] and State of Arkansas being in ill bodily Heatlh [sic] but of Sound disposing mind and memory and being anctious [sic] to make depository of my property while I have capasity [sic] so to do that I am blessed of   I do hereby make and publish this as my last will and Testament hereby revoking and making all other last Wills and testaments heretofore by me ma[de] Null and Void.

Item first I commend my Soul to God who gave it and my body to the earth and to be burried [sic] by my my [sic] Executor hereinafter named and appointed with as little expense and ostentations as will be suitable to my means

Item 2nd I will and bequeath unto my beloved wif[e] Nancy Wilborn one third of my real Estate hereinafter described and also my Wagon, and buggy and my Boy mule named Juin, Also one half of [a__] all my money I may have on hand o[n] my Death.

Item 3’d I give and bequeath unto my my [sic] Son Champion E Wilborn one third of my real Estate

Item 4 I give and bequeath unto my beloved daugh[ter] Mildred F. P. Wilborn one third of my real Estat[e] and my mau[s]e colored Mule John and also one half [of] all my money that I may have on hand at the tim[e] of my death.

Item 5 I give and bequeath unto my beloved son T. A Wilborn the Sum of one Dollar

Item 6 I give and bequeath unto my beloved son A. H. Wilborn the Sum of one Dollar

Item 7 I give and bequeath unto my beloved son W. [H] Wilborn the Sum of one Dollar

Item 10 I give and bequeath unto my beloved Daughter S. L. J. Tally the Sum of one Dollar

It is my Will that my Executor herein mentioned pay off all the above bequeaths after my death as soon as he conveniently can

Item 11 I hereby nominate and appoint my beloved Chanpoon [sic] E. Wilborn Executor of this my last will and Testament

A. W. Wilborn signed sealed published and declared by the Said Aminst [sic] W. Wilborn as and for his last Will and Testament in presence of us who at his request and in his presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as Witnesses herto [sic], in this the 5th day of December 1889

J C Fimby

A. J. Dodsen

State of Arkansas

County of Columbia

Personally appeared before me T. C Monroe Clerk Circuit Court and Ex officio Clerk Probate Court in and for said County and State J. C. Fimby and A. J. Dodsin [sic] the subscribing witnesses purporting to be the last will and testament of A. W. Wilborn deceased late of said County and State bearing date of 5th day of December 1889 who being duly sworn depose and saw that the said A. W. Wilborn signed sealed and published and declared the same to be his last Will and testament in their presence and called upon them to sign their names therto [sic] as witnesses and that they signed the same as such witnesses in the presence of each other and in the presence of the said A. W. Wilborn deceased and that said A. W. Wilborn was of sound mind and memory and over twenty one years old at the time of signing the same

Subscribed and sworn to before me on

this 14th day of Mch 1890

J C Fimby

T C Monroe Clk

A. J. Dodsin

Filed Mch 14′ & Recorded Mch 24th 1890 [signed] T C Monroe Clk

Transcription ends.

Source of will: Will Book B, pages 166-67

WILLIAM HARVEY WILBOURN

He is our maternal grandmother’s father (our great-grandfather).

August 13, 1870

He appears in Amonett’s 1870 Census

In the 1870 Census, Ward #2 (or 7), Post Office of Homer, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, page 21, Am W. Willborne is 48 years old and from South Carolina. He is a singing master. This matches up with the handwritten accounts of Ella Washington Wilbourn, his granddaughter (and our grandmother), who says he was a skilled musician and taught singing. His estate is valued at $800.00 (real) and $500.00 (person). Nancy is 42 and keeping house; Alex H. is 20 and at home. William H. (our direct line) is 17 and at home, as are all the other named children. Emeline G. is 15; Sarah L J is 12; Champion E is 8; Mildred F. P. is 5; and Judson is 2. They live in dwelling no. 95; family no. 158; the census enumerated 13 August 1870.

Transcription of the 1870 Census

1870 Census

Ward #2 (or 7), Post Office of Homer

Claiborne Parish, Louisiana

Name Age Sex Color Occupation Value of Estate Origin
Willborne, Am W. 48 M W Singing Master 800 (real)

500 (person)

SC
“ Nancy 42 F Keeping Home LA
“ Alexander H 20 M At Home
“ William H 17 “ “
“ Emeline G 15 F “ “
“ Sarah L J 12 “ “
“ Champion E 8 M “ “
“ Mildred F. P. 5 F “ “
“ Judson 2 M “ “
Page 21; dwelling no. 95; family no. 158; enumerated 13 August 1870

August 17, 1880

Marriage License: William Harvey Wilbourn and Frances Victoria Daniel

Transcription begins:

State of Texas

County of Palo Pinto

W. H. Wilbourn

F. V. Daniel

To any Judge of the County or District Court ordained minister of the Gospel or Justice of the Peace in and for said County.

Greeting

You are hereby authorized to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between Mr. W. H. Wilbourn and Miss F. V. Daniel and make due return to the Clerk of the County Court of said County within sixty days thereafter certifying you[r] action under this License.

Witness my official signature and Seal of office at office in Palo Pinto this 17th day of August AD, 1880 [Seal]

Wm Metcalf Clerk to Court

Palo Pinto Co Texas

I do hereby certify that on the 17th day of August AD 1880 I united in marriage W. H. Wilbourn and Miss F. V. Daniel the parties above named.

Witness my hand this 17th day of August AD 1880

John A. Patterson, JP

___ No. 4 Palo Pinto Co Texas

Filed and Recorded Oct 21st 1880

John A. Metcalf Clerk

By Jas E. Beaman Deputy

Transcription ends.

March 1974

This is a transcription of William Harvey Wilbourn’s daughter Ella Washington Wilbourn’s family remembrances.

She gets a few details wrong, but she knows her own father and grandfather.

Transcription begins:

1. March 1974

For Marge [her daughter-in-law]

I start with my paternal Grandfather.

Amonet Washington Wilbourn born Nov. 8 [sic], 1821 in Edgefield District, Liberty Hill So. Carolina died Dec. 8, 1889 at his farm 5 mi west of Magnolia Ark. He was 58 yrs [sic]. He was of Scottish descent.

My Grandmother’s maiden name was Maggie Nancy Gray, born Jan 1, 1827 in Bienvil [sic] Parish, La. Died the fall of 1903 [sic]. She was 77 years. She was half French and half Irish [probably all English, no French]. She & grandfather had eight children 4 girls and four boys names are: Eliza Ann, Thomas Abner, Leacie, William Harvey (my father) Emma Gertrude, Champion (“Champ”), Alexander Hargess, and Mildred Frances.

So far as I know all the children were born on the farm near Athens La.

My father William Harvey was born Dec. 9, 1852 Athens, La. died at Mountain View, Okla, March 1928; [died February 17, 1927, on his farm in Mountain View, Kiowa County, OK; and buried in Oakdale, February 17, 1927. He was 76. My mother’s maiden name was Frances Victoria Daniel, she was born 6 miles of Atlanta, Georgia, died Oct 22, 1903. She died on our farm a few miles from Mtn View Okla. She was 47 yrs when she died.

To this union ten children were born 6 girls and 4 boys their names as follows: William Amonet, Ernest Hasten, and Mae Virginia (twins), Alice Beatrice, Abbie Lee,

Ella Washington (named after my paternal grandfather), Maggie Nancy, Mertie Lillian, William Oscar, and Grady Ellis

The first six children were born in Palo Pinto County Texas, 8 miles of Santo, which is 40 miles west of Fort Worth.

All of the children reached adulthood, all married except two sons, Ernest Hastens and William Oscar. All have passed on except me.

Ella W Clark

She had married Frank Ryland; they divorced; then she married Reese Clark.

We don’t want this post to be too big, so we’re not providing information beyond our grandmother’s family history.

CONCLUSION

Dr. Robert Booth was an early pioneer of Jamestowne, dying before October 26, 1657. He arrived probably in 1638, which was early enough and in the right area for Jamestowne Society to count him in their qualifying Roll of Honor.

Go here and find his name, in alphabetical order:

http://www.jamestowne.org/ancestors-abbot—buckmaster.html

2 thoughts on “Robert Booth and Jamestowne Society

  1. I am also a descendant of Robert Booth, he’s my 12th ggrandfather. I am working on an application for the Descendants of Colonial Physicians and Chirurgiens going through him.

    Like

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